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 kissmyasthma
Joined: 12/4/2009
Msg: 20
Possible Food Crisis?Page 2 of 3    (1, 2, 3)
Sarniaboy, It is the approach of all industries that have put most everything at risk.
For far too long man has improved his standard of living and all along have probably been told of the risks and damage by scientists but have most likely ignored them until maybe recently.
We've gotten extremely good at getting what we need from mother earth, maybe too good. If you notice the decline in the bee population and the erosion of natural land that used to be right along side of farmland you can understand the problems at hand.
Check out the current debates over water usage in Alberta now that the oil sands have jumped into full swing. The impact will be tremendous.
Look into the spreading of deserts on either side of the equator and you can distinctly notice a decline in useful farmland.
We have manged to be able to ignore natural laws that affect every other species when it comes to population growth and even where we expand.
North America uses more electricity and energy on AIR CONDITIONING than Africa uses on everything.
Super size me is like the mantra of every American it seems. If you find a copy online
of Food Inc. ( movie2k.com) watch it. You will see insight into seeds and the plight of the little farmer.
I grow my own tomatoes and a couple of other veggies but I do not see backyard gardens like I did when I was a boy. In my area of Kitchener you could go garden raiding for kicks and feast on everything from peas to fresh strawberries now people complain when a wild raspberry vine invades their backyards.
We are so removed from where are food comes from that kids don't really know where the meat in their hamburgers actually comes from. French fries are considered a vegetable in far too many school food programs, I don't even want to mention just what goes into the chicken or fish sticks.

I imagine that starting a panic is the last thing any government wants but the smoke is starting to lift but it may take a catastrophe to really get the message across.
 sarniafairyboy
Joined: 6/19/2010
Msg: 21
Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 7/21/2010 9:26:41 AM
^^


We have manged to be able to ignore natural laws that affect every other species when it comes to population growth and even where we expand.
North America uses more electricity and energy on AIR CONDITIONING than Africa uses on everything.
Super size me is like the mantra of every American it seems. If you find a copy online
of Food Inc. ( movie2k.com) watch it. You will see insight into seeds and the plight of the little farmer.
I grow my own tomatoes and a couple of other veggies but I do not see backyard gardens like I did when I was a boy. In my area of Kitchener you could go garden raiding for kicks and feast on everything from peas to fresh strawberries now people complain when a wild raspberry vine invades their backyards.
We are so removed from where are food comes from that kids don't really know where the meat in their hamburgers actually comes from. French fries are considered a vegetable in far too many school food programs, I don't even want to mention just what goes into the chicken or fish sticks.

I imagine that starting a panic is the last thing any government wants but the smoke is starting to lift but it may take a catastrophe to really get the message across.


possibly true, but what is "Stopping" people from having gardens in the backyards?

basic laziness?

spending so much time on gadgets like cell phones & internet (posting on POF) ..lol .. rather than being outdoors in a healthy manner ?

surely this is people's "choice"?

you do not believe htere is 'conspiracy' to prevent people from having gardens?

if they did it would likely improve their physical as well as mental health..
 kissmyasthma
Joined: 12/4/2009
Msg: 22
Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 7/21/2010 11:51:14 AM
Most people here in the western world are oblivious because unless you were arounf during the shortages during say the last world war - each generation since has taken one step further away from the process.
Speaking of gadgets and stuff. Schools out right? In my neighbourhood they are currently replacing the telephone poles which means there are guys in the lifts dealing with shifting hydro wires to the new ones. Not a single kid out there checking out something that when I was a kid would have kept me occupied to the point that they would have had to tell our gang to get lost.
Ever watch the show "Fringe", there's a great scene in one episode where the the genius professor is freaking out in a grocery store because as he's reading the label of ingredients he comes across things that he exclaims out loud, "What are they trying to do , kill us?"
Nobody is listening to the truth in his rants but just seeing a crazy dude that is keeping them from picking up their favorite flavour of poptarts - the box he was reading was poptarts.
We don't eat food anymore, fresh veggies do not get government subsidies in the ways that corn or soybeans do. It is cheaper for a poor family to eat crap than to eat nutritious food.
Catch some Jamie Kennedy's food revolution, in it he tries to change the fattest towns eating habits or go to his website to see a special he did on farming techniques of chickens in the UK. Trust me, it may change your whole outlook on things like mayonaise and such.
A classic from him is he has a bunch of kids from that fat town USA and proceeds to strip a raw chicken down to the bone. He asks the kids if they would eat the left over carcass and they all say no.
But he proceeds to grind it up in a blender with a myriad of filler type things like corn starch and eventually breads these - tosses them in a fryer and voila, Nuggets.
The kids couldn't gobble them down fast enough. Talk about a distinct break in connectivity.
I know my sister grandchild loves salad but does she ever feed her salad when she spends the weekend - no, it is usually crap or pizza. I doubt she is the uncommon grandmother of today.

If we could switch everyone over to a diet of foods that only a ninety year old woman would recognize most people wouldn't or couldn't name half the stuff on the plate.
 Earthpuppy
Joined: 2/9/2008
Msg: 23
view profile
History
Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 7/21/2010 3:15:36 PM
"why do you put 'efficiency' in quotation marks"
The current system "efficiency" is depleting soils and aquifers, poisoning groundwater, creating nitrogen overloaded rivers that are going through eutrophication, creating a dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico, providing less healthy and sometimes deadly food, and killing off wildlife...to name a few externalities not considered when they call it "Efficient".

"are any people who posted on this thread farmers..? or ever were?"

I grew up on a dairy farm. I still have a few friends and family still in the business and several friends doing the CSA route. The push for mechanization and efficiency was well underway for decades when I was living the farm life. Farmers were constantly pushed to buy the newest equipment, upgrade, take out more loans, to stay competitive and become more efficient. Some things like shoveling manure over one's head and shoveling out silage were definately quality of life improvements once mechanized. (Near death experience for brother and I from nitrogen dioxide poisoning in the silo.) Most farmers then, like us had all the land prep, planting and harvesting equipment. Things like kick bailers and high topped wagons could allow two guys to put up 1500 bales of hay between milkings.
More silos allowed for a bigger herd. Dad tried the herbicide thing on one field one year and swore off it when all the earthworms disappeared. Where my grandfathers' generation was all about methodical, pay as you go, growth and effciency, the next generation was pushed/pulled into the financial treadmill. At that peak, farmers found themselves dumping milk in solidarity to try to bring prices up enough to allow them to stay in business. My father finally had to bail out. Between all the financial stress, half a stomach removed from ulcers, declining revenues, stray voltage, and a anhydrous ammonia accident, his wife threatened to leave him rather than watch him kill himself that way.

Where my grandfather and dad were able to survive for a few decades on 250 tillable acres, most farmers now cannot do so competitively with the giant agribusiness and megafarm model. They guy who bought our farm now owns or rents 2000 acres and is always bordering bankrupcy, depending on the weather.

One could assume that the $250,000,000,000 paid out in farm subsidies since 1995, would have helped saved many of the family farms in that period. Unfortunately though, in reality the subsidy program was designed and implimented to give the top 10%, the richest corporations, 75% of the money. Over 60% of remaining farmers are not eligible for any subsidies at all. Giant agribusiness has crafted in the primacy of corn, soybeans, wheat, rice, most of which is processed into unhealthy food products and cotton. Vegetable and fruit farms rarely quality for help. As has long been the case, those who practice the last vestiges of what could be considered sustainable farming continue to be winnowed out in favor of planet eating enterprises.
 kissmyasthma
Joined: 12/4/2009
Msg: 24
Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 7/21/2010 4:09:22 PM
I spent summers at my grandfathers farm near Waterloo in a small town called St. Agatha. There he had chickens and I saw them go from running around the yard to Sunday dinner - that involved cutting their heads off and plucking and gutting.
You are right that not all of my uncles were interested in staying on the farm save but one, his children saw the economic collapse that forced the family farm out of existence.
I think what you are missing is the disconnect aspect of it all. Food comes from the store or restaurant and before that it came from a truck is pretty much all the food industry really wants you to know.
There may some awareness ( and let us hope it grows ) in general in our instant world we just expect it to be there and don't pay much attention to how.
 Earthpuppy
Joined: 2/9/2008
Msg: 25
view profile
History
Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 7/21/2010 4:20:28 PM
For those interested, three recent documentary films of note have been helping people reconnect to the roots of the problem.
Food Incorporated..aka Food INC.
King Corn
The Real Dirt on Farmer John

Others?
Most folks either don't know or are in denial about how tenuous our food suppy is, and how dependent it is on a system that can be pulled out from under our collective feet in any numbers of ways on any given day. It's extremely hard to find GMO free soy products these days...
 lastmanstandinghere
Joined: 9/14/2008
Msg: 26
view profile
History
Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 7/23/2010 9:42:31 AM
I have to say, Earth Puppy, you really know your stuff! Thanks for this wealth of information. Although it is disheartening to hear about how others have suffered because of the corporate control, toxic pesticides and GMO infiltration of our land and furthering our disconnection with the earth, it's great to hear someone as knowledgeable as yourself, tell it like it is.
 sarniafairyboy
Joined: 6/19/2010
Msg: 27
Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 7/29/2010 11:45:08 AM

The human race is using up resources provided by mother nature over billions of years at a rate which is completely unsustainable, and the larder is rapidly becoming empty. Someone recently described the situation perfectly by saying that we are all sucking on the rear teat of a dead cow.
The mantra of the so called developed countries of the western world is that we need to continue growing year on year for ever, frequently throwing in the word sustainable to convince ourselves that this is possible. Anybody with a brain can see that continuous growth in a finite earth with finite land mass is impossible, so the question for us all should be how can we learn to live on Earth in a steady state equilibrium with mother nature.

The Sustainable Development Commission has tried to address this problem, but even they did not include the need to achieve a steady state global population, which would be essential.

The longer we drift into the disasters ahead caused by excessive use of resources in the dash for growth, the worse the treatment and cure will be, if it is not too late already.

The victims of our profligate ways in the last century are not those yet to be born in future centuries. They are our children and grandchildren who are alive today.
It is uncertain whether our political leaders are just unable to see beyond the next election and don't want to upset the voters or if they genuinely cannot see the that exponential growth in every aspect of our lives is neither desirable or possible.
Sadly, we are all locked into a catch 22 situation.


the sky is falling! the sky is falling!

when exactly will it fall?

The Luddites said the same thing you are saying,a round 200 years ago, the end was just around the corner

then Rachel Carson wrote "Silent Spring" published in 1962, basically saying we'd all be dead from pollution within 10 years or so

I mean , when really will it happen? people have been saying/predicting this stuff for a loooonnnnng time

if it's 50-60 years away it won't affect me-- I'll be dead.
 kissmyasthma
Joined: 12/4/2009
Msg: 28
Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 7/29/2010 12:35:59 PM
I think the luddites of the past sitting downtown with a placard stating the world is coming to an end and the ones who are actively observing a crumbling infrastructure are vastly different.
If you're seriously going to deny scientific evidence and physical proof that things are not changing you may find that you may be considered a luddite for thinking everything is hunky dory.
Google earth. Try looking up tropical rainforest and then compare that to as little as forty or fifty years back.
Deny that the G8 leaders don't have a team of scientists and engineers scrambling to develop plans to maintain coastal cities.

This is just an excerpt from a longer article.http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2008/04/12/world/main4011253.shtml

A Growing Worldwide Problem

There have been riots in Bangladesh, Egypt, Burkina Faso, Mauritania, Mozambique and Senegal. Rising prices have hit poor countries like Peru (and even developed countries like Italy and the United States).

A confluence of problems are driving the problem. They include soaring petroleum prices, which increase the cost of fertilizers, transport and food processing; rising demand for meat and dairy in China and India, resulting in increased costs for grain, used for cattle feed; and the ever-rising demand for raw materials to make biofuels.

As of December, 37 countries faced food crises, and 20 had imposed some sort of food-price controls. The U.N.'s World Food Program says it's facing a $500 million shortfall in funding this year to feed 89 million needy people.


As you can see there already is a small panic happening and just wait as oil gets scarcer or more expensive.
It is a bit two folded also in that as oil prices rise and water supplies dwindle it will happen quite quickly.
Canada may fare better in that we are in a decent climate but area such as the south west will suffer the most.

Big-Fish Stocks Fall 90 Percent Since 1950, Study Says
National Geographic News
May 15, 2003

Only 10 percent of all large fish—both open ocean species including tuna, swordfish, marlin and the large groundfish such as cod, halibut, skates and flounder—are left in the sea, according to research published in today's issue of the scientific journal Nature.

You add to this the destruction of the coral reefs and the removal of coastal wetlands plus the trawling of small fish like anchovies to feed the on land fish farms and we have a problem brewing.
One that isn't 50 years away. Man has gotten quite good at removing whole links in the ecosystem of this planet.
Most likely the earth will survive but mankind won't be around to see it.
 sarniafairyboy
Joined: 6/19/2010
Msg: 29
Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 7/29/2010 1:06:36 PM
^^


As you can see there already is a small panic happening and just wait as oil gets scarcer or more expensive.
It is a bit two folded also in that as oil prices rise and water supplies dwindle it will happen quite quickly.
Canada may fare better in that we are in a decent climate but area such as the south west will suffer the most.

Big-Fish Stocks Fall 90 Percent Since 1950, Study Says
National Geographic News
May 15, 2003

Only 10 percent of all large fish—both open ocean species including tuna, swordfish, marlin and the large groundfish such as cod, halibut, skates and flounder—are left in the sea, according to research published in today's issue of the scientific journal Nature.

You add to this the destruction of the coral reefs and the removal of coastal wetlands plus the trawling of small fish like anchovies to feed the on land fish farms and we have a problem brewing.
One that isn't 50 years away. Man has gotten quite good at removing whole links in the ecosystem of this planet.
Most likely the earth will survive but mankind won't be around to see it.




what is your recommendation? other than sitting around moaning, crying, & wringing our hands?

commit suicide now because it's all so hopeless anyway?

I mean, things to DO, not just worry about or think about over & over & over, constantly .

It's likely all too late, right?

I've always seen 2 types of people, those who can see the bad in everything, pessimists, waiting to die and accept their fate, and those who see good - optimists.

neither will ever seem to change the other's minds
 Earthpuppy
Joined: 2/9/2008
Msg: 30
view profile
History
Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 7/29/2010 2:54:42 PM
Racheal Carson issued a wakeup call. As a result of that wakeup call, we now still have Eagles and all sorts of other living things that may have persished, including many humans. The Cayahoga River fire was another wakeup call, as was the acid rain sterilization of streams. The Clean Air Act, Endangered Species Act, Clean Water Act, and the EPA were bourne of people, optimists, coming out and saying there is a better, saner and more moral way to live on this planet. While the pessimists and "I got mine" crowd tried to fight these changes toward civil behavior, they even benefited from changes in how we did business then. Optimist note what is wrong, speak out and accelerate the needed changes. The pessimists, don't worry, accept their fates, and have no concern or willingness to change their fatalistic ways. Really, what has posterity ever done for us?

If one has to seek out recommendations for things needed to do, there is apparently a disconnect between reality or a lack of caring. Despite past significant accomplishments in steering the ship away from some of the bigger iceburgs of our fate, there remains much navigation to be done and a strong, sincere and williing crew to keep us from sinking. If you're not part of the solution, you are part of the problem. An important tactic, when facing imminent doom, is to stay busy trying to solve the situation. That way, you just might pull it off, and at the least go down with some semblence of dignity without all that disturbing screaming.

Today's news...food chain in the ocean declining rapidly. Plastics, pollution, warming and acidification taking their toll.

http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2010/07/29-4
snip..
Microscopic marine algae which form the basis of the ocean food chain are dying at a terrifying rate, scientists said today.
[Pacific sardines (Sardinops Sagax) are pictured in 2006. A century-long decline in tiny algae called phytoplankton could disrupt the global ocean food chain, including the human consumption of fish, according to a study released Wednesday. (AFP/File/Gabriel Bouys) ]Pacific sardines (Sardinops Sagax) are pictured in 2006. A century-long decline in tiny algae called phytoplankton could disrupt the global ocean food chain, including the human consumption of fish, according to a study released Wednesday. (AFP/File/Gabriel Bouys)
Phytoplankton, described as the 'fuel' on which marine ecosystems run, are experiencing declines of about 1 per cent of the average total a year.

According to the researchers from Dalhousie University in Canada the annual falls translate to a 40 per cent drop in phytoplankton since 1950.

The research into phytoplankton comes as a separate report today offered evidence that the world has been warming for the past 30 years.

The reduction in the amount of algae in the seas could have an impact on a wide range of species, from tiny zooplankton to marine mammals, seabirds, fish and humans.

If confirmed, the decline of the phytoplankton would be a more dramatic change to nature's delicate balance than the loss of the tropical rainforests, scientist said.

The research, published in the journal Nature, said the declines were linked to rising sea-surface temperatures and changes in the conditions of the ocean, particularly close to the equator.

Most of the declines were seen in polar and tropical regions and in the open ocean, where most phytoplankton are produced.

The scientists suggested that in warmer oceans there was less movement between the layers of the sea, reducing the amount of nutrients delivered from deep water to the surface ocean.

As phytoplankton need both sunlight and nutrients to grow, the limits on the amount of nutrients in the upper layer of the sea affects production of the algae.

In addition, large-scale fluctuations in the climate, such as El Nino in the Pacific, affect phytoplankton on a year-to-year basis, the scientists said.

The research adds to the evidence that global warming was altering the oceans, with the changes in phytoplankton potentially having an impact on the health of the seas and on fisheries which people rely on for food.

Lead author Daniel Boyce said: 'Phytoplankton is the fuel on which marine ecosystems run. A decline in phytoplankton affects everything up the food chain, including humans.

Co-author Boris Worm, said: 'Phytoplankton are a critical part of our planetary life support system.

'They produce half of the oxygen we breathe, draw down surface carbon dioxide and ultimately support all our fisheries.

'An ocean with less phytoplankton will function differently and this has to be accounted for in our management efforts.'

Fellow author Marlon Lewis added: 'Climate-driven phytoplankton declines are another important dimension of global change in the oceans, which are already stressed by the effects of fishing and pollution.'
 FrankNStein902
Joined: 12/26/2009
Msg: 31
Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 7/31/2010 5:48:38 PM

...Possible Food Crisis?...

Or maybe it is just a ploy to artificially raise food prices.


Philippines swimming in rice amid high imports

MANILA, Philippines – The world's biggest rice importer, the Philippines, is now "swimming" in the staple grain because of massive imports by the previous government that drove world prices to record highs and possibly enriched corrupt officials...


http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/as_philippines_too_much_rice



Either way, it should be a wake up call for people to support a local farmer when ever possible.
 staceyssc
Joined: 10/18/2009
Msg: 32
view profile
History
Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 8/2/2010 12:10:51 AM
It seems to me that the trend of chemicals in our food has probably spiked and in the last few yrs has finally started to decline (very slowly). I have also been noticing more companies growing things hydroponically and that does not require as many chemicals. I think we will eventually be seeing more of the huge indoor farms and I think the food will very slowly become healthier.
 lastmanstandinghere
Joined: 9/14/2008
Msg: 33
view profile
History
Pretty compelling article -
Posted: 8/2/2010 7:39:12 PM
All about Eugenics, food manipulation, and what might be in store for us in the future....warning....some heavy stuff for those who'd rather not know:

http://foodfreedom.wordpress.com/2010/07/07/new-eugenics-and-the-rise-of-the-global-scientific-dictatorship/
 lastmanstandinghere
Joined: 9/14/2008
Msg: 34
view profile
History
7 nasty foods to avoid !!!
Posted: 8/2/2010 7:47:12 PM
7 Foods So Unsafe Even Farmers Won’t Eat Them

June 11, 2010


By Laurel House

Smoking was proven to be cancer-causing, tanning beds were shown to be on par with arsenic, but what about canned tomatoes, corn-fed beef, conventionally grown potatoes? What would it take to convince you to clean out your pantry and change your eating habits? Scientists, doctors, even farmers were asked what foods they refuse to eat. The responses had nothing to do with things like donuts due to fat content, or white bread because of the concentration of empty carbs. We’re talking seemingly healthy things like tomatoes, beef, popcorn, potatoes, salmon, milk, and apples. For them, it’s all about how they are produced and packaged.

Seven experts in fields pertaining to both food and the environment answered one simple question: “What foods do you avoid?.” Their answers, published in an article entitled “7 Foods the Experts Won’t Eat” on Yahoo! Shine, will make you re-think food. When it comes to food and its affect on your health and the health of this planet, this is what they answered:
1. Canned Tomatoes

The Expert: Fredrick vom Saal, PhD, an endocrinologist at the University of Missouri who studies bisphenol-A.
The Reason: Tin cans are lined with a resin that contains the synthetic estrogen bisphenol-A, which has been linked to a slew of health problems including heart disease, diabetes, reproductive problems, and obesity. But that’s not the biggest problem. The acid in tomatoes breaks down that bisphenol-A, leaching it into the food, and not just in insignificant amounts. According to the article, Saal comments that “you can get 50 mcg of BCA per liter out of a tomato can, and that’s a level that is going to impact people, particularly the young.” That’s why he’s not touching the stuff.
The Solution: If you lo0ve the taste of “canned” tomatoes but prefer to skip the bisphenol-A, select glass bottles instead.

2. Corn-Fed Beef

The Expert: Joel Salatin, co-owner of Polyface Farms and author of half a dozen books on sustainable farming.
The Reason: Cattle are naturally grass eaters… not grain eaters. In order to fatten the animals (and profit margins), farmers feed them corn and soybeans. And while the farmers are beefing up their earnings, they are minimizing the nutritional benefits. The article mentions the findings from a recent USDA-conducted study comparing corn-fed beef and grass-fed beef showing that grass-fed beef is “higher in beta-carotene, vitamin E, omega-3s, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), calcium, magnesium, and potassium; lower in inflammatory omega-6s; and lower in saturated fats that have been linked to heart disease.”
The Solution: Pretty straight forward: Opt for grass-fed beef instead.

3.Microwave Popcorn

The Expert: Olga Naidenko, PhD, a senior scientist for the Environmental Working Group.
The Reason: It’s not the popcorn itself, but the chemically-saturated lining of the bag including a compound called perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) that, according to a recent study from UCLA, may be linked to infertility. Microwaving vaporizes the chemicals as they move from coating the bag to lining the popcorn. But it’s not like this fact is un-acknowledged. In fact the article points out that DuPont, as well as other manufacturers, have “promised to phase out PFOA by 2015 under a voluntary EPA plan, but millions of bags of popcorn will be sold between now and then.”
The Solution: Pop your own popcorn the way they did it in the olden days–in a pot.

4. Conventionally Grown (Not Organic) Potatoes

The Expert: Jeffrey Moyer, chair of the National Organic Standards Board.
The Reason: Herbicides and pesticides may not be sprayed directly on root vegetables (since they’re underground), but they absorb the chemicals through the soil and water. Because potatoes are considered the nation’s most popular vegetable, producing a healthy crop is essential to keep up with demand. In order to maintain their health, the article exposes the scary fact that “they’re treated with fungicides during the growing season, then sprayed with herbicides to kill off the fibrous vines before harvesting. After they’re dug up, the potatoes are treated yet again to prevent them from sprouting.” But here’s the scary thing, Moyer says that he’s talked to potato growers “who say point-blank they would never eat the potatoes they sell. They have separate plots where they grow potatoes for themselves without all the chemicals.”
The Solution: Another no-brainer— Only buy organic potatoes.

5. Farmed Salmon

The Expert: David Carpenter, MD, director of the Institute for Health and the Environment at the University at Albany and publisher of a major study in the journal Science on contamination in fish.
The Reason: When salmon is crammed into pens, fed soy, poultry litter, and hydrolyzed chicken feathers (obviously an unnatural environment for the up-stream swimmers), they’re levels of healthy vitamin D lowers as the contaminants increases. Those contaminants include carcinogens, PCBs, brominated flame retardants, and pesticides (like DDT). The article points out that DDT has been linked to both diabetes and obesity, quoting Carpenter in saying that “You can only safely eat one of these salmon dinners every 5 months without increasing your risk of cancer… It’s that bad.”
The Solution: Avoid farmed salmon and instead select wild-caught Alaskan salmon. But make sure the packaging reads “wild.” If it just says “fresh Atlantic,” according to the article, “it’s farmed.”

6. Milk Produced with Artificial Hormones

The Expert: Rick North, project director of the Campaign for Safe Food at the Oregon Physicians for Social Responsibility and former CEO of the Oregon division of the American Cancer Society.
The Reason: Unlike in the olden days when fresh milk was some of the purest nutrients you could get, dairy cows today are fed growth hormones like rBGH and rBST to increase milk production. Problem is, while they may be making more milk, they are also increasing their chances of udder infections (which can lead to pus in the milk). More than that, the article points out that high levels of IGF-1 from the rBGH may play a role in the development of breast, prostate, and colon cancers… which is why North says that “it’s banned in most industrialized countries.”
The Solution: Read the labels and be sure that your milk doesn’t contain rBGH or rBST and that it is labeled organic or “produced without artificial hormones.“

7. Conventional Apples

The Expert: Mark Kastel, former executive for agribusiness and co-director of the Cornucopia Institute, a farm-policy research group that supports organic foods
The Reason: Apples are the recipient of the most pesticides of all Fall fruits. Chemical producers swear that the residue is not harmful for human consumption, but the Yahoo! Article goes on to quote Kastel in saying that “Farm workers have higher rates of many cancers.”
The Solution: Buy organic apples where available or at least thoroughly wash and peel apples before eating them.
 justbunky
Joined: 4/3/2009
Msg: 35
view profile
History
7 nasty foods to avoid !!!
Posted: 8/3/2010 12:25:31 PM
"The sky is falling! The sky is falling!"

---Chicken Little
 Earthpuppy
Joined: 2/9/2008
Msg: 36
view profile
History
7 nasty foods to avoid !!!
Posted: 8/3/2010 5:06:24 PM
They couldn’t hit an elephant at this dist. . . .

~ General John Sedgwick, Union Commander, died: 1864. Killed in battle during US Civil War.
 Hawaiianluau
Joined: 11/13/2008
Msg: 37
7 nasty foods to avoid !!!
Posted: 8/3/2010 5:39:56 PM
7. Conventional Apples

The Expert: Mark Kastel, former executive for agribusiness and co-director of the Cornucopia Institute, a farm-policy research group that supports organic foods
The Reason: Apples are the recipient of the most pesticides of all Fall fruits. Chemical producers swear that the residue is not harmful for human consumption, but the Yahoo! Article goes on to quote Kastel in saying that “Farm workers have higher rates of many cancers.”
The Solution: Buy organic apples where available or at least thoroughly wash and peel apples before eating them.

Wouldn't that be because, even if it is related, that they are the ones applying and working amongst the poisons not because they are eating all that many apples? Actually I would think that the workers on an apple farm 6 or 7 days a week would never want to eat another apple again.
But then I ain't no ..... expert ...... hahahaaaaaa.
 Earthpuppy
Joined: 2/9/2008
Msg: 38
view profile
History
7 nasty foods to avoid !!!
Posted: 8/3/2010 6:25:55 PM
I did migrant labour as a kiddo. Have been burned by pesticide residues. Lost friends early from various organ cancers. Live with those time bombs. One mornin of tree planting, I had a skin rash that haunted me for a couple of weeks, with breathing difficulties that lasted a month. 2-4 D was the herbicide du jour then. Many tree planters in the 70s took in agent Orange in the pacific NW after it was banned from Vietnam defoliation. Those planters and the Vietnames kids and grandkids, troops and others are still reaping that bitter harvest.

A small bit of empathy for the victims of that era of errors might be in order. The birth defects, cancers and other long term results of that invasion are being visited upon in orders of magnitude by DU poisoning in other colonies.
 Hawaiianluau
Joined: 11/13/2008
Msg: 39
7 nasty foods to avoid !!!
Posted: 8/4/2010 2:38:13 PM
Exactly my point.
# 7 wants us to believe it's from eating the food.
 Hawaiianluau
Joined: 11/13/2008
Msg: 40
7 nasty foods to avoid !!!
Posted: 8/5/2010 1:35:31 AM
Inhaling pesticide 8 or ten hours a day for 100 days is not the same as having an apple once in a while that has been cleaned and washed.
 sarniafairyboy
Joined: 6/19/2010
Msg: 41
7 nasty foods to avoid !!!
Posted: 8/5/2010 9:16:41 AM

The toxic chemicals that drench our crops, fruit and vegetables are then absorbed through the roots and skins contaminating them.

Rinsing produce under tap will not remove pesticide from them.

Corporations and governments admit that there are pesticide residues in our food. Drops of water on the skin of an apple will not detoxify it.

In the UK, the Pesticides Safety Directorate (PSD), an Executive Agency of the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) says:

"When we approve pesticides we expect that small amounts (residues) will usually turn up in food supplies. They are also expected to turn up in the environment and drinking water... "


* 43% of all fruit and vegetables contain measurable pesticide residues
* 50% of all lettuce has pesticide residues from more than 7 synthetic chemicals
* 30% of all cereals are contaminated with pesticide residues
* 93% of Oranges contain pesticide residues


and 100% of the air in any city is drenched with way more carbon monoxide, various nitrous oxides, and others too numerous to count, from auto exhausts, combustion engines, and home heating systems as well as manufacturing plants, and electric power plants, to name a few sources

I trust therefore that you will be immediately getting rid of your car, not heating your home or at least using renewable resources (wood only), using priamrily candles as a light source, never using air conditioning, gettign rid of the computer (uses electricity, and also nasty manufacturing processes involving plastics (non-renewable petroleum products, acids, copper & gold -plated components, wiring, etc., etc.)

these actions should be taken post-haste

why be a hypocrite any longer??

VVV

"easier said than done" , yes indeed.

which is likely why when all is said & done, WAY more is 'said' , than actually 'done'.

far easier to rail against the "evils" othose mythical "OTHERS" are doing , than to look at your own lifestyle & the multiple ways in which YOU yourself contribute to the 'problems'.

because you surely wouldn't want to inconvenience yourself in any way, though you demand everyone esle do so, basically -farmers should 'not be allowed' to use modern pesticides, etc. but YOU should be allowed to drive cars which spew poisons into the air we breathe, fly in airplanes which have ahuge carbon footprint, use modern techonlogy & the products of industrial manufacturing, etc..etc.

tell others they are 'wrong', but you of course are never part of the 'problem', right?

VVV
 kissmyasthma
Joined: 12/4/2009
Msg: 42
7 nasty foods to avoid !!!
Posted: 8/5/2010 9:35:04 AM
Easier said than done I suppose.
 sarniafairyboy
Joined: 6/19/2010
Msg: 43
7 nasty foods to avoid !!!
Posted: 8/5/2010 10:44:36 AM

"easier said than done" , yes indeed.

which is likely why when all is said & done, WAY more is 'said' , than actually 'done'.

far easier to rail against the "evils" othose mythical "OTHERS" are doing , than to look at your own lifestyle & the multiple ways in which YOU yourself contribute to the 'problems'.

because you surely wouldn't want to inconvenience yourself in any way, though you demand everyone esle do so, basically -farmers should 'not be allowed' to use modern pesticides, etc. but YOU should be allowed to drive cars which spew poisons into the air we breathe, fly in airplanes which have ahuge carbon footprint, use modern techonlogy & the products of industrial manufacturing, etc..etc.

tell others they are 'wrong', but you of course are never part of the 'problem', right?




Take a chill pill...no one is demanding that YOU anything. Sounds like you might be a little toxic yourself.


Sir aye aye Sir

I will take that chill pill, car-using 'account executive'.

sounds like you are doing very little for the environment, other than to preach & talk down at others about how 'bad' they are.

Sorry, I do realize that hypocrites can get a little angry when their blatant hypocrisy is pointed out to them.

I'l take the chill-pill, then relax in my air-conditioned living room set at 60 deg. while outside it's 90 deg. and enjoy the fireplace blazing ;)

then I'll compose a letter to the editor about how bad pollution is, and how sad it is that "people" don't care more about the environment, and deliver it with my 8 MPG Hummer.

maybe I'll print up a few thousand flyers about the problem too, & take a jet airplane to various cities to distribute them -go on a speaking tour talking about the problem while burning thousands of gallons of fossil fuels

oh yeah & fly over the BP Deep Water Gulf of Mexico blowout disaster & shed a tear or 2 about how 'terrible' it all is..that's what I'll do

IF it's OK with you..& I don't have to take too many 'chill pills' ;) -they are made from non-renewable resources after all
 kissmyasthma
Joined: 12/4/2009
Msg: 44
possible food crisis
Posted: 8/10/2010 6:58:38 AM
There are so many that think living the lifestyle that sarniaboy describes is normal and well deserved, they could be watching many hours of commercial TV and never be phased by the public service announcements asking them to cut back on the AC or to recycle.
There is the problem. I have family members that drive me crazy with some of their habits. My sister is one of those who sets her ac down as low as it will go but occasionally open a window or leave it set there even when it is cooler outside.
There is a old guy who supplements his retirement income by delivering flyers every week. He uses a small farm truck pulling a trailer to do it.
A bundle the size of a small log is placed into pretty much every mailbox on my street and when you figure that this is happening every week all over the city - 52 weeks a year - every year. It adds up even more when you consider the same right across the country.
Now why would this still be necessary when a very high percentage of those houses all have internet access? There are websites (flyerland.ca ) that can show you all of these ads yet people look forward to thursday when the guy comes around with this weeks bundle.
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