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Possible Food Crisis?Page 1 of 3    (1, 2, 3)
by Eric deCarbonnel

If you read any economic, financial, or political analysis for 2010 that doesn’t mention the food shortage looming next year, throw it in the trash, as it is worthless. There is overwhelming, undeniable evidence that the world will run out of food next year. When this happens, the resulting triple digit food inflation will lead panicking central banks around the world to dump their foreign reserves to appreciate their currencies and lower the cost of food imports, causing the collapse of the dollar, the treasury market, derivative markets, and the global financial system. The US will experience economic disintegration.

The 2010 Food Crisis Means Financial Armageddon

Over the last two years, the world has faced a series of unprecedented financial crises: the collapse of the housing market, the freezing of the credit markets, the failure of Wall Street brokerage firms (Bear Stearns/Lehman Brothers), the failure of Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae, the failure of AIG, Iceland’s economic collapse, the bankruptcy of the major auto manufacturers (General Motors, Ford, and Chrysler), etc… In the face of all these challenges, the demise of the dollar, derivative markets, and the modern international system of credit has been repeatedly forecasted and feared. However, all these doomsday scenarios have so far been proved false, and, despite tremendous chaos and losses, the global financial system has held together.

The 2010 Food Crisis is different. It is THE CRISIS. The one that makes all doomsday scenarios come true. The government bailouts and central bank interventions, which have held the financial world together during the last two years, will be powerless to prevent the 2010 Food Crisis from bringing the global financial system to its knees.

Financial crisis will kick into high gear

So far the crisis has been driven by the slow and steady increase in defaults on mortgages and other loans. This is about to change. What will drive the financial crisis in 2010 will be panic about food supplies and the dollar’s plunging value. Things will start moving fast.

Dynamics Behind 2010 Food Crisis

Early in 2009, the supply and demand in agricultural markets went badly out of balance. The world experienced a catastrophic fall in food production as a result of the financial crisis (low commodity prices and lack of credit) and adverse weather on a global scale. Meanwhile, China and other Asian exporters, in an effort to preserve their economic growth, were unleashing domestic consumption long constrained by inflation fears, and demand for raw materials, especially food staples, exploded as Chinese consumers worked their way towards American-style overconsumption, prodded on by a flood of cheap credit and easy loans from the government.

Normally food prices should have already shot higher months ago, leading to lower food consumption and bringing the global food supply/demand situation back into balance. This never happened because the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), instead of adjusting production estimates down to reflect decreased production, adjusted estimates upwards to match increasing demand from china. In this way, the USDA has brought supply and demand back into balance (on paper) and temporarily delayed a rise in food prices by ensuring a catastrophe in 2010.

Overconsumption is leading to disaster

It is absolutely key to understand that the production of agricultural goods is a fixed, once a year cycle (or twice a year in the case of double crops). The wheat, corn, soybeans and other food staples are harvested in the fall/spring and then that is it for production. It doesn’t matter how high prices go or how desperate people get, no new supply can be brought online until the next harvest at the earliest. The supply must last until the next harvest, which is why it is critical that food is correctly priced to avoid overconsumption, otherwise food shortages occur.

The USDA—by manufacturing the data needed to keep supply and demand in balance—has ensured that agricultural commodities are incorrectly priced, which has lead to overconsumption and has guaranteed disaster next year when supplies run out.

An astounding lack of awareness

The world is blissful unaware that the greatest economic/financial/political crisis ever is a few months away. While it is understandable that general public has no knowledge of what is headed their way, that same ignorance on the part of professional analysts, economists, and other highly paid financial "experts” is mind boggling, as it takes only the tiniest bit of research to realize something is going critically wrong in agricultural market.


USDA estimates for 2009/10 make no sense

All someone needs to do to know the world is headed is for food crisis is to stop reading USDA’s crop reports predicting a record soybean and corn harvests and listen to what else the USDA saying.

Specifically, the USDA has declared half the counties in the Midwest to be primary disaster areas, including 274 counties in the last 30 days alone. These designations are based on the criteria of a minimum of 30 percent loss in the value of at least one crop in the county. The chart below shows counties declared primary disaster areas by the secretary of Agriculture and the president of the United States.



The rest is here -

http://www.marketskeptics.com/2009/12/2010-food-crisis-for-dummies.html
 Lint Spotter
Joined: 8/27/2009
Msg: 2
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History
Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 7/18/2010 9:57:10 AM
Finally... a diet that I can stick to!

Seriously... I don't believe that we're going to run out of food in 2011. It will become more expensive... but it does every year. Food costs are constantly inching up... it's called inflation. Furthermore, if you ask some people, we're already in a food crisis... even distribution of affordable foodstuffs sucks...
 itsallinthesoul
Joined: 6/26/2009
Msg: 3
Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 7/18/2010 10:25:43 AM
Well if that does happen, I can see the problem with obesity being solved rather quickly.....there is always someone trying to use scare tactics to control the masses.....
 SingleGuy4912
Joined: 7/25/2006
Msg: 4
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Posted: 7/18/2010 10:26:17 AM
It's doubtful there will be a food crisis. Pretty much any crop grown here are also grown in other parts of the world. If we can't grow enough for our own consumption i.e. due to natural disaster, we import from other areas of the world. Sure the prices will go up but they will go back down once we get back on our feet. A couple years ago there was a rice crisis when prices doubled within a couple months because of some problem in Thailand but now it's back to normal. If one product becomes prohibitively expensive, people will just shift to consuming something less expensive.
 sarniafairyboy
Joined: 6/19/2010
Msg: 5
Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 7/18/2010 10:30:36 AM

If you read any economic, financial, or political analysis for 2010 that doesn’t mention the food shortage looming next year, throw it in the trash, as it is worthless. There is overwhelming, undeniable evidence that the world will run out of food next year. When this happens, the resulting triple digit food inflation will lead panicking central banks around the world to dump their foreign reserves to appreciate their currencies and lower the cost of food imports, causing the collapse of the dollar, the treasury market, derivative markets, and the global financial system. The US will experience economic disintegration.

The 2010 Food Crisis Means Financial Armageddon

Over the last two years, the world has faced a series of unprecedented financial crises: the collapse of the housing market, the freezing of the credit markets, the failure of Wall Street brokerage firms (Bear Stearns/Lehman Brothers), the failure of Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae, the failure of AIG, Iceland’s economic collapse, the bankruptcy of the major auto manufacturers (General Motors, Ford, and Chrysler), etc… In the face of all these challenges, the demise of the dollar, derivative markets, and the modern international system of credit has been repeatedly forecasted and feared. However, all these doomsday scenarios have so far been proved false, and, despite tremendous chaos and losses, the global financial system has held together.

The 2010 Food Crisis is different. It is THE CRISIS. The one that makes all doomsday scenarios come true. The government bailouts and central bank interventions, which have held the financial world together during the last two years, will be powerless to prevent the 2010 Food Crisis from bringing the global financial system to its knees.


ah, something else to worry about and have sleepless nights over!

we had the 'end of the world' coming due to Y2K, Dec. 31, 1999, now again in 2012 due to the Mayan thing..now THIS

some humans seem to have a "NEED "To to worry

and if this IS happening what can we do to prevent/change it?

worry?

that will do NOTHING to change it
 sarniafairyboy
Joined: 6/19/2010
Msg: 6
Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 7/18/2010 10:32:44 AM

It's doubtful there will be a food crisis. Pretty much any crop grown here are also grown in other parts of the world. If we can't grow enough for our own consumption i.e. due to natural disaster, we import from other areas of the world. Sure the prices will go up but they will go back down once we get back on our feet. A couple years ago there was a rice crisis when prices doubled within a couple months because of some problem in Thailand but now it's back to normal. If one product becomes prohibitively expensive, people will just shift to consuming something less expensive.


I've seen "crisis" books written in 1979 in the deep discount bins at book stores, predicting this would happen "FOR SURE" in 1980, or 1981..

predicting disaster gets attention, sells newspapers, gets TV news viewers, internet site hits, etc., etc.

the "SECRET" to getting known as an awesome predictor with amazing accuracy is tho make thousands of predictions, often

then later focus on the few that turned out right, by then people will have forgotten about the hundreds or thousands of "wrong" ones. see Elliott wave theory, Prechter, et al..(Nostradamus) - also make predictions in vague ways that 'could be' interpreted in many different ways..

This same guy called for the EXACT same crisis to happen in 2009.. did it?

another 'secret' to predictions is to make the same one every year for many years, likely it will eventually be right!!

even a STOPPED (analog) clock is right twice per day.
 Tah,
Joined: 11/18/2008
Msg: 7
Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 7/18/2010 1:06:16 PM
its sumfin we gotta do............................is eat!
 sarniafairyboy
Joined: 6/19/2010
Msg: 8
Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 7/18/2010 1:13:51 PM


there is always someone trying to use scare tactics to control the masses


True, although, suppose the real tactic is creating a food crisis which justifies some sort of global "solution"? You know- create a "problem" and then give the masses their solution on a silver platter. You never know, right?


*gasp*

you mean..something like a "Food Patriot Act" to strip away more civil liberties?

give the illusion of security while taking away liberty? like the "other " Patriot Act did?

restricting civil liberties far more in response a one-time hit on 9/11, than was the case for WW II when there were far more real 'national security ' risks?

If you will trade liberty for security you will end up with neither!

hope the Fatherland Security nazi Agency is not monitoring this too closely!
 valenciacityx
Joined: 3/10/2009
Msg: 9
Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 7/18/2010 6:08:44 PM
there will be a fat tax levied on the obese as they eat more than anyone else.
 Outdoor2
Joined: 4/1/2006
Msg: 10
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Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 7/19/2010 12:01:47 AM
NSSM 200. Google it.
 daynadaze
Joined: 2/11/2008
Msg: 11
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Posted: 7/19/2010 3:35:40 PM
Yeah, tax the obese they eat all the food. Oh wait, what about those skinny people who eat like pigs and never gain? So is your prejudice just that you hate fat people or that you don't really know much about how much food most people eat without becoming fat? I'm guess you just found a good spot to slam fat people.

If we are going to bytch about people who eat more than their share, let's start with athletes who bulk up. Yeah. let's hate them!

 sarniafairyboy
Joined: 6/19/2010
Msg: 12
Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 7/19/2010 3:38:15 PM

Yeah, tax the obese they eat all the food. Oh wait, what about those skinny people who eat like pigs and never gain? So is your prejudice just that you hate fat people or that you don't really know much about how much food most people eat without becoming fat? I'm guess you just found a good spot to slam fat people.

If we are going to bytch about people who eat more than their share, let's start with athletes who bulk up. Yeah. let's hate them!


you may have noticed that the poster who said : "tax the obese" is a looooonnng ways from being a 'skinny Minnie' himself?
 sarniafairyboy
Joined: 6/19/2010
Msg: 13
Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 7/20/2010 2:20:49 PM

The idea isn't as far-fetched or alarmist as it may seem at first glance. At the turn of the 20th century, more than fifty percent of the American labor force earned a living through direct involvement in agriculture, but this number decreased to just 2% by the year 2000. Even more frighteningly, only .8% of Americans are involved in the industry full-time.

This transition is a distressing one indeed. While demographic shift from rural to urban lifestyles may seem like a blessing to many who loathe the hard labor associated with rural, agrarian life, it may spell disaster for those who are struggling through life in the Big City, hundreds or even thousands of miles from their food sources.


so the US food industry (agriculture ) is more than 60 times as efficient now than it was a the turn of the 19th century?

wow that's quite an impressive achievement! congrats to those in the business, farmers
 Earthpuppy
Joined: 2/9/2008
Msg: 14
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Posted: 7/20/2010 3:58:54 PM
"so the US food industry (agriculture ) is more than 60 times as efficient now than it was a the turn of the 19th century?..wow that's quite an impressive achievement! congrats to those in the business, farmers "

In reality, those who profit most from the US food model, are ADM, Cargill, Monsanto, etc. With every new technology, new food scam or ethanol scam, real farmers are washed out in waves. In the last wave of corn ethanol, that rush raised crop land prices forcing tens of thousands out of the business as land prices, land rent prices, fertilizer prices, and seed prices climbed. It also led to farmers ploughing through drainage protection strips, foregoing crop rotation, cutting down tree lines that prevented wind erosion, putting marginal and worn Conservation Reserve Programs lands into prodution, and other dust bowl land abuses. The false "solution" of biofuels will only exacterbate an already dire situation for the relentless destruction of that thin layer of living soil that lays between us and destitution.
http://culturechange.org/cms/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=107&Itemid=1

Much of the "efficiency" comes from consolidation into mega-farms, run more like industrial growing operations rather than farms. The biggest "efficiency" gain came from fossil fuels for everything from equipment, fertilizers, chemicals, and long transport of foodstuffs 1500 miles on the average, from soil to mouth.

Over half of Iowa's top soil has been squandered in the last few generations. Corn is being produced in a manner that uses up soils 12-20 times the rate of renewal. Wells in the cornbelt have a great chance of being contaminated with atrazine, roundup, and other toxic chemicals. My little midwestern hometown is now on it's third multi-million dollar well, a major financial disaster for a burg of 500 souls. Then there is the rapid depletion of aquifers for irrigation and ethanol production.

In the Illinois farm lands, long wall mining is causing vast areas of subsidence, where prime farmland drops several feet, converting it from productive land to swamps.

We've lost an untold treasure trove of information on local and sustainable food systems as the Western world has urbanized and turned the landscape into one where giant machines roam the thinning soils. We've also been losing a cornucopia of biological diversity in food stuffs, many species that would be far more resilient, less water dependent, and actually healthy for us.

We've become content with the toxic, oil dependent,Genetically Modified, less nutritious and less tasty "perfect" foods that line our produce isle, but all that can disappear rapidly with any major disruption. I was on Oahu during a longshoreman's strike in the early 70s. Diets changed rapidly to pineapple primacy and toilet paper was in short supply. I overdosed on Pineapple during those few months and took years to recover.

The health implications of GM and toxics dependent foods will be known in due time. We will also find out the implications of the decimation of bees, bats, birds and other pollinators at a time when it will be too late. As Roundup-Ready crops breed Roundup Ready weeds, we will found out how efficient the super weeds will be in humbling us. Bon appetit!
 deltadallas
Joined: 7/13/2009
Msg: 15
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Posted: 7/20/2010 4:11:57 PM
this sounds like something from the Scify channel. someone is trying to do a Doom and Gloom epic making some gullible /scary folks do stupid , suicidal stuff. all a family needs to do is raise some chickens, pigs, goats and vegetable garden or even a catfish pond. i got me some Jesus and he takes good care of me !

 kissmyasthma
Joined: 12/4/2009
Msg: 16
Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 7/20/2010 4:14:29 PM
Taken has touched on something very significant. The very fact that there was such an increase in productivity has lead to amazing population growth but we've peaked.
I was reading an article the other day that GM foods may be our only salvation but at what price? Sure we may fill our bellies but what goes in may be severely lacking any nutrients.
It isn't that difficult these days with things like google earth to have a look at the southwest and see the water depletion that is occurring due to the growth in that region.

Me, I'm way more concerned with the depletion of life in the oceans, I never thought I would ever hear of shortages of certain fish. Being in touch with the restaurant industry has shown me just how bad things could get.

Sure everyone says we can farm fish buy little does anyone realize the food they feed these farm fish are being removed from the oceans at alarming rates and won't do anything but make things worse.

The chains of life on our planet are being broken and many are not being told the truth.
 sarniafairyboy
Joined: 6/19/2010
Msg: 17
Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 7/21/2010 7:59:30 AM

In reality, those who profit most from the US food model, are ADM, Cargill, Monsanto, etc. With every new technology, new food scam or ethanol scam, real farmers are washed out in waves. In the last wave of corn ethanol, that rush raised crop land prices forcing tens of thousands out of the business as land prices, land rent prices, fertilizer prices, and seed prices climbed. It also led to farmers ploughing through drainage protection strips, foregoing crop rotation, cutting down tree lines that prevented wind erosion, putting marginal and worn Conservation Reserve Programs lands into prodution, and other dust bowl land abuses. The false "solution" of biofuels will only exacterbate an already dire situation for the relentless destruction of that thin layer of living soil that lays between us and destitution.
http://culturechange.org/cms/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=107&Itemid=1

Much of the "efficiency" comes from consolidation into mega-farms, run more like industrial growing operations rather than farms. The biggest "efficiency" gain came from fossil fuels for everything from equipment, fertilizers, chemicals, and long transport of foodstuffs 1500 miles on the average, from soil to mouth.


why do you put 'efficiency' in quotation marks

why should farms be so different from other industries..? do you think auto manufacturing would be more 'efficient' if rather than large-scale concentrated manufacturing plants we had small ones in each neighborhood with 2 or 3 non-specialized guys in a garage? that produced 2 or 3 cars a year? no interchangeability, if you needed parts you'd have to go back to that one small local manufacturer? how about steel manufacturing? a small local neighborhood smelter maybe in some guy's garage rather than large plants?

not sure that this is all the result of some evil scheme & conspiracy by large corp's and gov't.

are any people who posted on this thread farmers..? or ever were? many people don't want to do it, it's too much work & financially risky too..most young people want to get off the farm and move to the cities -"more to do" , more entertainment choices
 Outdoor2
Joined: 4/1/2006
Msg: 18
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Posted: 7/21/2010 8:34:49 AM
The "efficiency" of industrial farming, with it's heavy usage of chemicals (to name but one) will eventually destroy nutrients in the ground and the soil will die, rendering it useless. Their efficiency today may well lead to ruin tomorrow.
 sarniafairyboy
Joined: 6/19/2010
Msg: 19
Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 7/21/2010 9:02:07 AM

The "efficiency" of industrial farming, with it's heavy usage of chemicals (to name but one) will eventually destroy nutrients in the ground and the soil will die, rendering it useless. Their efficiency today may well lead to ruin tomorrow.


on a quick scan it looks to me as though every poster lamenting the decline of the family farm and farming as an occupation is employed in.. a desk type job, manipulating data, not in farming

do you suggest we'd be better off if we were more like 1950's People's Republic of China with 3/4 of our population all working in agriculture, each tending a small, maybe 1/2 acre plot of land? collecting our family's human feces and animals and using it as fertilizer?

or 1930's USSR?
 kissmyasthma
Joined: 12/4/2009
Msg: 20
Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 7/21/2010 9:21:19 AM
Sarniaboy, It is the approach of all industries that have put most everything at risk.
For far too long man has improved his standard of living and all along have probably been told of the risks and damage by scientists but have most likely ignored them until maybe recently.
We've gotten extremely good at getting what we need from mother earth, maybe too good. If you notice the decline in the bee population and the erosion of natural land that used to be right along side of farmland you can understand the problems at hand.
Check out the current debates over water usage in Alberta now that the oil sands have jumped into full swing. The impact will be tremendous.
Look into the spreading of deserts on either side of the equator and you can distinctly notice a decline in useful farmland.
We have manged to be able to ignore natural laws that affect every other species when it comes to population growth and even where we expand.
North America uses more electricity and energy on AIR CONDITIONING than Africa uses on everything.
Super size me is like the mantra of every American it seems. If you find a copy online
of Food Inc. ( movie2k.com) watch it. You will see insight into seeds and the plight of the little farmer.
I grow my own tomatoes and a couple of other veggies but I do not see backyard gardens like I did when I was a boy. In my area of Kitchener you could go garden raiding for kicks and feast on everything from peas to fresh strawberries now people complain when a wild raspberry vine invades their backyards.
We are so removed from where are food comes from that kids don't really know where the meat in their hamburgers actually comes from. French fries are considered a vegetable in far too many school food programs, I don't even want to mention just what goes into the chicken or fish sticks.

I imagine that starting a panic is the last thing any government wants but the smoke is starting to lift but it may take a catastrophe to really get the message across.
 sarniafairyboy
Joined: 6/19/2010
Msg: 21
Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 7/21/2010 9:26:41 AM
^^


We have manged to be able to ignore natural laws that affect every other species when it comes to population growth and even where we expand.
North America uses more electricity and energy on AIR CONDITIONING than Africa uses on everything.
Super size me is like the mantra of every American it seems. If you find a copy online
of Food Inc. ( movie2k.com) watch it. You will see insight into seeds and the plight of the little farmer.
I grow my own tomatoes and a couple of other veggies but I do not see backyard gardens like I did when I was a boy. In my area of Kitchener you could go garden raiding for kicks and feast on everything from peas to fresh strawberries now people complain when a wild raspberry vine invades their backyards.
We are so removed from where are food comes from that kids don't really know where the meat in their hamburgers actually comes from. French fries are considered a vegetable in far too many school food programs, I don't even want to mention just what goes into the chicken or fish sticks.

I imagine that starting a panic is the last thing any government wants but the smoke is starting to lift but it may take a catastrophe to really get the message across.


possibly true, but what is "Stopping" people from having gardens in the backyards?

basic laziness?

spending so much time on gadgets like cell phones & internet (posting on POF) ..lol .. rather than being outdoors in a healthy manner ?

surely this is people's "choice"?

you do not believe htere is 'conspiracy' to prevent people from having gardens?

if they did it would likely improve their physical as well as mental health..
 kissmyasthma
Joined: 12/4/2009
Msg: 22
Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 7/21/2010 11:51:14 AM
Most people here in the western world are oblivious because unless you were arounf during the shortages during say the last world war - each generation since has taken one step further away from the process.
Speaking of gadgets and stuff. Schools out right? In my neighbourhood they are currently replacing the telephone poles which means there are guys in the lifts dealing with shifting hydro wires to the new ones. Not a single kid out there checking out something that when I was a kid would have kept me occupied to the point that they would have had to tell our gang to get lost.
Ever watch the show "Fringe", there's a great scene in one episode where the the genius professor is freaking out in a grocery store because as he's reading the label of ingredients he comes across things that he exclaims out loud, "What are they trying to do , kill us?"
Nobody is listening to the truth in his rants but just seeing a crazy dude that is keeping them from picking up their favorite flavour of poptarts - the box he was reading was poptarts.
We don't eat food anymore, fresh veggies do not get government subsidies in the ways that corn or soybeans do. It is cheaper for a poor family to eat crap than to eat nutritious food.
Catch some Jamie Kennedy's food revolution, in it he tries to change the fattest towns eating habits or go to his website to see a special he did on farming techniques of chickens in the UK. Trust me, it may change your whole outlook on things like mayonaise and such.
A classic from him is he has a bunch of kids from that fat town USA and proceeds to strip a raw chicken down to the bone. He asks the kids if they would eat the left over carcass and they all say no.
But he proceeds to grind it up in a blender with a myriad of filler type things like corn starch and eventually breads these - tosses them in a fryer and voila, Nuggets.
The kids couldn't gobble them down fast enough. Talk about a distinct break in connectivity.
I know my sister grandchild loves salad but does she ever feed her salad when she spends the weekend - no, it is usually crap or pizza. I doubt she is the uncommon grandmother of today.

If we could switch everyone over to a diet of foods that only a ninety year old woman would recognize most people wouldn't or couldn't name half the stuff on the plate.
 Earthpuppy
Joined: 2/9/2008
Msg: 23
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Posted: 7/21/2010 3:15:36 PM
"why do you put 'efficiency' in quotation marks"
The current system "efficiency" is depleting soils and aquifers, poisoning groundwater, creating nitrogen overloaded rivers that are going through eutrophication, creating a dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico, providing less healthy and sometimes deadly food, and killing off wildlife...to name a few externalities not considered when they call it "Efficient".

"are any people who posted on this thread farmers..? or ever were?"

I grew up on a dairy farm. I still have a few friends and family still in the business and several friends doing the CSA route. The push for mechanization and efficiency was well underway for decades when I was living the farm life. Farmers were constantly pushed to buy the newest equipment, upgrade, take out more loans, to stay competitive and become more efficient. Some things like shoveling manure over one's head and shoveling out silage were definately quality of life improvements once mechanized. (Near death experience for brother and I from nitrogen dioxide poisoning in the silo.) Most farmers then, like us had all the land prep, planting and harvesting equipment. Things like kick bailers and high topped wagons could allow two guys to put up 1500 bales of hay between milkings.
More silos allowed for a bigger herd. Dad tried the herbicide thing on one field one year and swore off it when all the earthworms disappeared. Where my grandfathers' generation was all about methodical, pay as you go, growth and effciency, the next generation was pushed/pulled into the financial treadmill. At that peak, farmers found themselves dumping milk in solidarity to try to bring prices up enough to allow them to stay in business. My father finally had to bail out. Between all the financial stress, half a stomach removed from ulcers, declining revenues, stray voltage, and a anhydrous ammonia accident, his wife threatened to leave him rather than watch him kill himself that way.

Where my grandfather and dad were able to survive for a few decades on 250 tillable acres, most farmers now cannot do so competitively with the giant agribusiness and megafarm model. They guy who bought our farm now owns or rents 2000 acres and is always bordering bankrupcy, depending on the weather.

One could assume that the $250,000,000,000 paid out in farm subsidies since 1995, would have helped saved many of the family farms in that period. Unfortunately though, in reality the subsidy program was designed and implimented to give the top 10%, the richest corporations, 75% of the money. Over 60% of remaining farmers are not eligible for any subsidies at all. Giant agribusiness has crafted in the primacy of corn, soybeans, wheat, rice, most of which is processed into unhealthy food products and cotton. Vegetable and fruit farms rarely quality for help. As has long been the case, those who practice the last vestiges of what could be considered sustainable farming continue to be winnowed out in favor of planet eating enterprises.
 kissmyasthma
Joined: 12/4/2009
Msg: 24
Possible Food Crisis?
Posted: 7/21/2010 4:09:22 PM
I spent summers at my grandfathers farm near Waterloo in a small town called St. Agatha. There he had chickens and I saw them go from running around the yard to Sunday dinner - that involved cutting their heads off and plucking and gutting.
You are right that not all of my uncles were interested in staying on the farm save but one, his children saw the economic collapse that forced the family farm out of existence.
I think what you are missing is the disconnect aspect of it all. Food comes from the store or restaurant and before that it came from a truck is pretty much all the food industry really wants you to know.
There may some awareness ( and let us hope it grows ) in general in our instant world we just expect it to be there and don't pay much attention to how.
 Earthpuppy
Joined: 2/9/2008
Msg: 25
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Posted: 7/21/2010 4:20:28 PM
For those interested, three recent documentary films of note have been helping people reconnect to the roots of the problem.
Food Incorporated..aka Food INC.
King Corn
The Real Dirt on Farmer John

Others?
Most folks either don't know or are in denial about how tenuous our food suppy is, and how dependent it is on a system that can be pulled out from under our collective feet in any numbers of ways on any given day. It's extremely hard to find GMO free soy products these days...
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