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 Perfectly me
Joined: 12/10/2006
Msg: 35
she has been diagnosed with bipolarismPage 2 of 16    (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16)
[quotte]so my question is this , what do u know bout bipolarism from EXPERIENCE?
this is the second time my dad has isolated himself from me because of a woman has something like this ever happend to you?
i really dont know what to do i have told my dad i dont htink he should marry her, i told him when it comes to respect the road goes both ways,


Hey there ambitious_libra , I feel for you. My mom is bi-polar and was literally Hell on Wheels for much of my life. Most of the men she married left her for much greener pastures. The kids she had did too later. One man stayed with her and was literally treated like her slave for the rest of his life. We all would try to ge him to stand up to her or leave her but he never did. Let me say this was a wonderful, stable, gentle man and without him we wouldn't have had much of a childhood at all. What we did have wasn't pretty.

Fast forward I actually came back into her life about 20 yrs ago. Right off the bat I set firm boundaries letting her know that if she crossed them I would be long gone. It helped a lot, I don't think anyone else ever did that with her. most of my family's relationship with her was all about the battle of the b*** and all either avoided her or fought with her or like my step-dad was owned by her as the case may be.

I would try to get your dad, maybe through a family intervention, to get some help with his co-dependency issues. It is much like being addicted to someone who drinks or does drugs you see. He seems to have surrendered the control of his life to her and everyone is looking at, watching and figuring her out. Sounds very familiar to me. No matter how crazy she acts or if she can help it or not, he is enabling her to come between you and the rest of your family. Perhaps he is lost in the drama but he needs to be aware of what he is doing by playing her victim, and you need to focus on his recovery not hers.

All you can do with her is set your own firm boundaries and keep them as calm as you can. She lives for Drama, if there isn't any she will create it. You might have to set them with your Dad too but I would try to do an intervention first with the family if possible.

I hope this helps you, nobody deserves this kind of treatment, especially you. The collateral damage for the innocent victims is assured by the willing participation of the original victim. He needs to wake up.
 TheVoiceWithin
Joined: 6/29/2008
Msg: 36
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she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/6/2008 7:05:59 AM
To Quazi 100:

"Best of luck to you and your daughter in the future.....you are a loving, compassionate Mom...."

Thank you so much for your kind comment. This disorder is indeed painful for the one affected, and trying for those around them. I see the discrimination and lack of understanding that my daughter faces everyday, but I am confident that with love and understanding, we will be able to educated people about this disorder, and provide a place of understanding instead of fear and misconceptions.
 Quazi 100
Joined: 3/2/2008
Msg: 37
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she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/6/2008 8:47:51 AM
I'm not quoting any posts, this is a kind of general reply all....

Is Bi-Polar the "new" disease...actually it's been replaced with Borderline Personality Disorder, and especially Narcissism, already....

Do people who have been diagnosed Bi-Polar just need to be kicked in the pants and told to smarten up? Well it depends on how the Bi-Polar is caused...the longer it goes untreated, the worse it will get. An adult I know was in an acute manic state....had come up with a new "slogan" for "Nike"....decided "just do it" was passe. He was telephoning for flights to New York, to discuss this with "Nike".....I took the phone and put it down. It took me a full half hour to convince this person that he was in a manic state....and he was FULLY aware of his disease. He TRULY believed that he was doing the right thing. Personally, I think a kick in the pants would give him a sore butt, and he needed to see a Doctor....quickly

Compassion, understanding, nurture, all contribute to a better outcome than stigma, ignorance, judgment....would hagars be in the condition he's in if he were treated better? Personally, I don't think he would.

Doctors that diagnose Bi-Polar, when someone is withdrawing from cigarettes, and Meth (for God sake) shouldn't have a license to practice..withdrawal psychosis..it's quite common.

And finally....when you are in a relationship with someone who is Bi-Polar, it is not your responsibility to figure out if their behaviour is disease related, or normal biatchiness....if it can be called normal biatchiness, then it is.....When they want to fly to New York, to talk to Nike, you should intervene.
 Perfectly me
Joined: 12/10/2006
Msg: 38
she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/6/2008 8:54:35 AM

for that last 3 years my dads fiance has treated me like crap ,one summer when i was 17 i stayed at their house for like a month, they got into some kind of argument his fiance ended up walking away from him unhooked the telephone and threw it in my face and told me to get the F out , she has never apoligized to me for this till this day

after that she has yelled at me for all sorts of things and i honestly mean it when i say that i was innocent all those times she got into my face or ****ed me out on the phone

one time she told me she was going to change the number and the only way i'll have the number is if my dad gives it to me

she has managed to isolate my dad from the entire family including me , shes gotten to the point of being controlling , she has told him his money is her money

just today she almost got her ass kicked by my aunt for getting into her face saying my dad never signed a contract to pay money that he owes to her,( my dad WILLINGLY paid my aunt back for paying his part for him for something that happend long before she even came into the picture

now i found out she has been diagnosed with bipolarism, i dont really know too much bout that disorder but i know from experience of dating someone that was bipolar that the medication does not make change them it reduces their mood swings and their outbursts but they are still the same person

another thing i suspect shes schizophrenia , she told my dad i was not welcome to stay at their house to visit becuz i cant be trusted and i dont RESPECT her

, ironically even though all those times she got into my face i never copped an attitude i always found myself explaining to her and talk some damn sense to her

i never cussed at her i never called her names when i was 17 i actually burst into tears, i have never disrespected her let alone defend myself the way i should have instead of being a wimp

so my question is this , what do u know bout bipolarism from EXPERIENCE?
this is the second time my dad has isolated himself from me because of a woman has something like this ever happend to you?
i really dont know what to do i have told my dad i dont htink he should marry her, i told him when it comes to respect the road goes both ways,


i honestly do not know what to do. i think the only thing i can do is step back
its his decision to let a woman come between him and his only daughter and ruin his life



This is what the OP said, she's a young woman who's father is in a relationship with a bi-polar woman. She has been attacked by this woman and pushed out of her dad's life. All the Blah, Blah, Blah about helping the bi-polar person isn't helping her at all. She seems to need help on how to deal with her father and by default her fathers girlfriend.
 Quazi 100
Joined: 3/2/2008
Msg: 39
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she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/6/2008 9:27:53 AM
I already said this....the father has dependency issues. She can talk to him, and try to convince him to get counselling (with the girlfriend there, he won't go on his own). If he is a strong individual, he will take her advice, and start standing up to, or get rid of the girlfriend. Once a dynamic has been set for a relationship, it's really hard to change it, unless the person changing the dynamic has a really strong constitution.

I've had a lot of training with this kind of behaviour, and what I'm about to say might freak some of you out. It's extreme, but so is the behaviour.

You can stay away from your father and his girlfriend.

Or, this takes lots of guts...if she confronts you, put your hands on your hips, stand right in front of her, wait until she stops yelling...then say, "are you done" and walk away. This will confuse her, because she's used to you explaining yourself. She might follow you, ranting at you..that means you got to her...you aren't playing the game right. Things might escalate for a while. But if you keep on facing the confrontation, and then walk away, she's gonna get the idea that it isn't working anymore, sooner or later. If she follows you, keep walking until she gets tired of it, get in your car and go to the store, just get away.

Here's the hard part....if she raises a hand to you, you should speak to your father, and have him speak to her immediately. If that doesn't happen, tell her if it happens again, that you will phone the police, and STICK TO IT. Where I live, they will haul your butt to jail, and charge you with assault.

She will not be a happy camper if this eventuality happens...if things remain as they were before, you are going to be in for a LONG HAUL with this plan. It takes a very strong mind, and a lot of courage. It does work, I've done it.

So there it is....a plan.....see why nobody addressed it before?
 TheVoiceWithin
Joined: 6/29/2008
Msg: 40
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she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/6/2008 2:05:38 PM
I am truly saddened by many of the responses and frightened for my daughters future, if the comments here are any indication of what she is going to have to face in her lifetime. From experience, I can tell you that medication, therapy and love and support does help people suffering from this disorder. An individual who does not take responsibility for their treatment, is quite different from someone who is responsible and works hard to keep their bipolar manageable. My daughter's bipolar is inherited from my ex-husband (her father), whose bipolar was not diagnosed or managed until after our divorce. At her age, she is learning to recognise the triggers, knows the importance of taking her medication, maintaining a healthy diet, getting the proper amount of sleep, and finally, the importace of therapy. As a family, we are dealing with it by understanding the disorder, and ensuring that we have a support system in place to help us in our effort of helping our loved one. Unfortunately, with the media, people are inundated with negative messages regading bipolar, and placing all people suffering from it into one basket...a negative one. I can assure you, my daughter is intelligent, articulate,talented and a productive member of her school and family. She is moody and cycles often with her bipolar...but it is part of who she is, and she is a part of who we are as a family. I am very blessed to have her in my life and I would not trade her for anything...bipolar or not.
 surely im shirley
Joined: 6/14/2008
Msg: 41
she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/6/2008 5:24:20 PM
I would suggest OP...that this woman is threatened by you and/or your relationship with your father.

My sister is bi-polar. She has alienated herself, her husband and her daughter from everyone else, including family. It is her fear that other people will confer with them about her in a negative way. These people enable her, by allowing her to believe that she is 'normal' in this endeavor and twisted thinking.

I read an autobiography by Patti Maclean, author of Bird on a Wire. I think that I have the spelling wrong...however it was the best insight into manic depression that I have found. The difference between the author and my sister, and many of the people, different posters have described is that Patti came to terms with the symptons, cause and effects of her illness. She came to know after an episode that she had behaved unfairly and inappropriately, and took the steps necessary to make amends. Not everyone is this strong. My sister, after so many years, chooses to make her illness an excuse, for her shortcomings but does not accept accountability for her inappropriate behavior. She quotes all of the symptoms and terminology but continues to believe that her social behavior is unaffected. In 10 years, she has never lived a period of longer than a few months in a "normal" capacity. She, like the OP's future step mom, chooses to believe that others are responsible.

Tough.

A very, very, difficult situation always.... and my heart goes out to anyone in this situation. If your father is to survive in this relationship that it appears that he has chosen, he must be selfless, and be prepared for abuse. I feel sorry for my sister's husband, but for his own reasons, he has chosen to support her. After all, he loves her, and sometimes, she is the person he met and grew to love, and even in the worst of times still maintains some of these qualities. He understands her illness, and chooses to stay by her.
 Quazi 100
Joined: 3/2/2008
Msg: 43
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she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/7/2008 11:40:47 AM

He did to me what she is doing to your dad. He has to see it and come to the realization that you are his daughter without a choice. He also has to want to make sure that you stay in his life. I think you should tell him how much you love him and how much you want to keep him in your life. But after that it is his discision. DONT blame yourself if he picks her over you. He will eventually realize what's happened and hopefully come to you and apologize. I know that it's hard..


One thing I do know from personal experience for sure.....my Mom picked my step-Dad over me...... it burned my behind until the day my Mom died.

I don't know how it would affect you, but if it happens, please don't rule therapy out...it really does help.
 Quazi 100
Joined: 3/2/2008
Msg: 46
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she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/7/2008 7:48:56 PM

Ok yes everyone here needs to do more research on this disorder. You are all a$$holes. Did you ever consider that her dad's fiance was just a B*tch? And for everyone information, Bipolar disorder isn't a mental illness. Its a biological illness just like heart disease or diabetes. The only reason people THINK its a mental illness is because its treated like one.

How about you educate your ignorant selves and look at people and not the label. Some people are a$$holes without bipolar, so really get a life. And Saveyourself69, you are the most ignorant and pompous a$$ I have ever come across in my life. Why are you even on this site? "Not single/not looking" ???? You're 30, grow the F up!


I have spent the day in front of my computer, trying to help a woman from South Carolina, who is suicidal and Bi-Polar by E-MAIL! No phone conversations....MESSAGES!

I'm sure that if I told her that her problem isn't actually a "mental illness", it would have solved everything!

Sorry, just a little on edge, I talked her out of it as of 7:00 tonight...so far so good.

Refine your technique, drop the hostility, and advocate for a change of status......
 infinitebrainspace
Joined: 7/18/2008
Msg: 47
she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/7/2008 10:13:18 PM
I'm not going to side with, or alienate myself from anyone on this fourm by griping / slamming / or accusing them of being wright or wrong. I am however, going to revisit my relationship of 10 years with a human being who was diagnosed with BPD - complicated with Borderline Personality disorder. This person was my girlfriend for 5 years, my wife for 5 more, the mother of my son, and now my Ex-wife for 3 years. As stated by the author, she was the perfect choice as a mate in the beginning. She eventually caused me to quit two very good jobs. Any friends I had before I met her were off limits - not because she said so, but because they wouldn't put up with her obnoxious behavior - which meant they would only associate with me if she wasn't there. She would tell me that my kids (from a prior marriage) were cruell to her while I was at work, and I (not thinking she would lie) disciplined my children for their actions. I have to live with knowing that I chose her over my own children, and that I punnished them for things they never did. My own children did not want to visit me anymore. She would accuse me of having an affair if I was 15 minutes late comming home from work, and in the end - after the divorce - I found out that she in fact had had several flings during our relationship. She would threaten to leave because she thought I only wanted her for sex - which didn't make sense because we seldom had sex. An argument would escallate over meaningless things - like she just wanted to fight over something - probably because she always ended up putting me in a no-win situation, which gave her a false sense of superiority. The borderline personality made it worse because she would often take on a different personality - of someone she just met, or someone on TV. I never knew who I was comming home to. Sometimes she would be waiting for me with a smile, and loving open arms, and other times she would be waiting for me with claws out, and ready to fight. If I could say a few things to the authors father, I would say: "look beyond what she says to what is really the truth, and you will find they don't jive. Make your choice to live in her fantasy, or in the real world with your family and friends. It only gets worse, and eventually you will be looking for someone else anyway. Believe your child, she loves you".
 be thankful
Joined: 7/25/2008
Msg: 50
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she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/10/2008 8:05:44 AM
..i would only date a b/p girl if she was hot!!...wait a minute i did that already..and she screwed guys behind my back,and pulled a knife on me...nevermind.
 Silent_One508
Joined: 5/9/2008
Msg: 51
she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/30/2008 3:56:02 PM
Bi-polar disorder, can be controlled with medication, and therapy. Usually different kinds and combinations of medicine must be tried before the correct "recipe" for the particulare individual can be found. Sometimes on the first try. Bi-polar people live in manic cycles (some every 5, or 7 years). The up side of the cycle is like being on coke, they feel invincible, and they like the feeling, of course when the down side of the cycle hits, it's like coming off of the ultimate "high". This is why so many bi-polar people don't like the meds when they are in the up cycle. How do I know this, I have 2 sisters, 1 brother, and my mother are bi-polar. But as with any form of mental illness or "addiction", the person needs to admit to themselves that there is a problem, because if they feel they don't have a problem, then they won't take the medication. It is a form of depression, (though at time they may sound schizophrenic). But in answer to your question, all that you can do is to support your dad, and when he isolates himself, just let him know that you are there if he needs you. But remember, it doesn't have to come between you, you need to be more understanding when he pushes you away, and be there when he doesn't.
 superbadzzz
Joined: 8/16/2008
Msg: 52
she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/30/2008 10:05:27 PM
hey, it's better than being diagnosed with communism.
 WVTeacher
Joined: 3/21/2007
Msg: 53
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she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/30/2008 10:41:31 PM
My son was diagnosed as bipolar fifteen years ago. He was 15 years old at the time. (I was going through a divorce at that time, which profoundly affected my son.) He has struggled with this mental illness ever since then. Whenever he gets off his medication, he takes a nose dive with depression and his thinking becomes confused. In order to function as normally as possible, he must not only stay on his MEDICATION, but he also must get PROFESSIONAL COUNSELING as well to help him stay focused and in reality. Many people that are bipolar are prone to having bad tempers and more prone to violence.

If your dad is serious about possibly marrying this woman, then he (and also you) need to become educated on dealing with a bipolar personality. In general, they are NOT EASY to live with because of the drastic mood swings and bouts of depression.

I hope that everything works out for you and your dad. You should tell him that relationships with women may come and go, but relationships with your children are forever!! God Bless, Take Care.
 Quazi 100
Joined: 3/2/2008
Msg: 55
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she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/31/2008 5:39:12 PM

People can have "breakthrough" manias, and the medications can alter the person's personality so that they are a seemingly non-communicative, bland individual devoid of personality.


Sometimes during "breakthrough" manias, meds can be increased.....what some people don't realize, is that once the manic episode is over, chances are, the meds can be lowered again. If someone is acting like they have been lobotomized, chances are, they are overmedicated, and could possibly be o/d ing.....best thing to do is get your blood level checked.
 Quazi 100
Joined: 3/2/2008
Msg: 57
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she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 9/1/2008 8:18:37 AM

My reply has almost nothing to do with this thread other than the topic sentence, but after reading this topic for a few days my head was about to explode and I just had to let it out so, here goes.


The proper terminology for the disorder is Bipolar Disorder, or Manic Depression. Bipolarism is not even a word, let alone a medical term. If you are going to be able to cope with someone who is severly Manic Depressive you should at least know what the actual diagnosis is so you can do research and better understand the disorder so you can be more supportive. If you can't even put the time into doing the research about the disorder someone you care about has been diagnosed with, then there is no reason for you to even try and work it out.


 Chetaroo
Joined: 10/30/2007
Msg: 58
she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 9/1/2008 11:22:55 AM
Dude, how old are you? I'm guessing at least 18, given your answer. And what I can say is go directly to the exit. Your Dad is whooped and probably enjoys crazy woman sex. So, write off any inheritence. Write off being able to talk any sense into his penis controlled brain. Don't for a moment think you can change this woman or your dad--or even think it is your job. Walk away from it and get on with your life. Yeah, it's brutal but you are not the crazy one. Don't be a victim for another moment. Don't feel guilty and don't let them pull any guilt crap on you. I'm tempted to wish you good luck. But, in all honesty, you make your luck....so start making it.
 Quazi 100
Joined: 3/2/2008
Msg: 59
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she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 9/1/2008 2:44:32 PM
beelieve....

I have both Bi-polar II and Borderline Personality Disorder....I have lived with both Bi-polar and Borderline Personality Disorder individuals.

I could not escape...unfortunately they were my parents. Did I mention that they were also alcoholics?

I have been working for 20 years to get this monkey off my back. It appears to be working. I came to a point where it was a choice of straightening myself out, or ending up dead. Literally.

Much of the recovery process involves changing thinking patterns, and behaviour patterns. Again, unfortunately, one has to recognize that his/her thinking is not appropriate. Therein lies the rub. Your girlfriend will have been just as convinced that the was "right" as you are. Chances are, she wasn't intentionally tormenting you.

My question to you is.....why did you stay for so long? If you knew she was mentally ill, and would do nothing about it, why didn't you leave?

Does the mentally ill person do the crime....yes. But why did YOU do the time?
 cncgandolf
Joined: 7/29/2007
Msg: 60
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she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 9/1/2008 4:31:59 PM
"Try, just once, to actually live with and love these people."

I have personally; currently do as part of my service to my community.

I don't live with them if they are not in treatment. I would not recommend it. However, I don't recommend anyone living with anyone who suffers from any disease who is refusing treatment. Why pick one disease over another? Living with a person who is not having their disease treated is enabling and destructive.
 nellybaby
Joined: 8/20/2008
Msg: 61
she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 9/1/2008 4:48:03 PM
not all of us are bad people.. i have been treated for bi-polar type 1 with manic depression and over all we are great people just have mood swings and often feel like things are crashing in on us which doesnt make us so horrible or hard to get along with... i feel people judge people way to easy and dont always give us a chance as soon as they hear we are bi-polar they bolt like lighting... and often as this happens to me meds dont always make u the happiest it just enhances ur moods.. meaning if your happy your really happy and if you are mad u have rage of 100 seas. so please before you judge us all give us a chance
 ladyc4
Joined: 2/14/2006
Msg: 62
she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 9/1/2008 5:08:22 PM
I'm not going to wade thru all the posts....
Speaking directly to the OP, what were the circumstances surrounding this diagnosis? Was this diagnosed by a psychiatrist who is acting in the lady's interest?

Let me clue y'all in on something. Bipolar disorder is a very popular diagnosis with doctors who do "independent" medical examinations for Workers Comp and other insurance compensation. There are no objective tests, either medical, behavioral, written tests,etc that can be used to support the diagnosis. If the OP's dad's fiancee or whatever she is, got this diagnosis from a psychiatrist that she sought out and had been having sessions with, there may be something to it. That said, it's very treatable and some of the newer medications do not have the "flattening" effect that lithium was/is famous for.

But the thought that crosses MY mind, is that people who truly do cope with bipolar disorder would be highly offended to be compared with this lady. I'd say her "disorder" is just being a major b*tch.
Cindy O
 Quazi 100
Joined: 3/2/2008
Msg: 63
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she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 9/1/2008 5:16:58 PM

By the way, for those of you who ask us to be more understanding with those with this illness, this is a trap! Don't tolerate their behavior. Don't forgive it. Make it very clear to them that they have a serious problem. Make it clear to them that they must deal with their problem immediately, or you will end your relationship with them.


I want understanding, huh?

Your girlfriend sounds BPD or both BPD and Bi-Polar....18 months to end a relationship isn't Bi-Polar, it's definitely BPD.

This is what you should have been doing during the first six months, while you were taking the abuse.

We (BPD and Bi-Polar) need to be given "boundaries" because we don't realize that we're being inappropriate. As crazy as that sounds, it's true. If our rages, and demands are met with "love", we don't know we're doing something wrong. We need to be told "firmly" that we are being inappropriate....not yelling.....speaking "firmly". The reaction will be that of a two year old at first, but with time, we clue in that you're right, and we're wrong. Pointing out consequences of our behaviour if we do it "our" way, can go a long way to getting compliance as well......

Yep....you're right I do want understanding.....
 surely im shirley
Joined: 6/14/2008
Msg: 64
she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 9/2/2008 7:37:36 AM
I commented earlier that my sister is Bi-polar. Her doctor can't seem to get her meds right. Part of the problem is the actual illness. In her manic state she will research all of her drugs and others and then dictate her own prescription to the doctor and it seems that this doctor lets her. She bases her opinions on the possible side effects, such as weight gain, etc. Having read all the posts, I'm in agreement with those who believe that some disorders overlap, because that best explains my sister's symptoms. Otherwise, I would have to believe that she is simply a manipulative, miserable, mean, mouthy, Bitc. who wants to believe that she is as mentally normal as any one else, and so blames everyone else for her issues. She records all of her phone conversations so that she can obsess over them for days, and then take them out of context to suit her own interpretation. Her family can do nothing right! She believes that we are all conferring and plotting against her. She has alienated her husband and daughter from the rest of the family, and now that her daughter is setting her own limits for Mom's inappropriate behavior, my sister has now disassociated herself from her daughter. The only thing that keeps her relatively calm is to enable her in her delusions that everyone else is always wrong. She does not accept accountability for horrendously inappropriate behavior and speech, and often claims no memory of the incident as it is described to her, but insists on her own version and blames us. Truly sometimes, the people around her honestly feel they are losing their minds! I truly cannot comprehend that her marriage appears to be stable and can only think that her husband is some kind of martyr! We don't know because he isn't allowed to talk to us. We love her and we are sorry that she is in pain. This is apparent. Who would choose to be this way? We just don't know how to help.

To the OP....don't take her personally. She is controlled by the disease and if she can't or won't admit it...there is absolutely nothing you can do. You can stand by your Dad and simply leave when the going gets tough. Your Dad has chosen to stand by her. That doesn't mean he loves you less, but that he is powerless to control her actions...and he loves her too. I can see that none of us have been much help. People dealing with those we love who suffer from any mental illness are just as confused and distraught as you are and just trying to get through one day at a time.
 surely im shirley
Joined: 6/14/2008
Msg: 65
she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 9/2/2008 9:27:47 AM

The only people who can function with the bipolar person is a very strong willed, confident person. However, the bipolar person in denial will push this person away because they can't manipulate them in the way they need to.


Thank you for that! I am the person that my sister hates most! I am the only one in her life who refuses to be manipulated and she is so very threatened by that. I didn't want to say it first, but I am so glad to hear someone agree. This has been my belief for years. I was completely astounded to learn recently from her daughter that she too has been alienated because she reminds her mother of me. The daughter is also now expecting accountability from her mother.

The question is....will our attitudes help her if we can't be with her or are we really just saving ourselves?
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