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 Vannili
Joined: 7/8/2008
Msg: 151
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she has been diagnosed with bipolarismPage 6 of 16    (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16)
I have dated a shyolder man that changes into positive and negative personality in a blink of an eye while we are dining and talking, It really gaves me a creep,he'd look at me with a rounded eyes and put his forefinger and thumb inside his mouth like touching is lower back tooth,then he'd be back to normal chatty and friendly.. I felt really grossed that he touched my hand and face with his hand full of dried salivas full of bacteria.
I was thinking that perhaps this is a bipolar symtoms, so I asked him >>"do you know what is a bipolar ,desease ? Is it a mental sickness? " His reply was precised > No it is not a mental sickness, but you have to make the person happy all the time..... Gee, that is a hard job to make a person happy all the time.
 boinkboinkboink
Joined: 3/20/2009
Msg: 152
she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/22/2009 2:57:46 PM
Mindchatter,

If you need to draw attention to yourself by announcing that you are bipolar then you have a problem. If you have control over your behavior, there is no reason to mention anything about your problem until quite a bit later in the relationship. The only reason to make early mention of your problem is if you expect that you behavior will be erratic and difficult. In other words, you are giving us forewarning. Many of us who have experienced this erratic and difficult behvior will NEVER put themselves in that position again. It is all consuming. The relationship loses its balance. It is all about YOU. I don't want this kind of relationship. There are limits to the amount of love and understanding that you are entitled to. You don't deserve this continued love and understanding if the relationship is only about you. There needs to be balance. Are you truly capable of giving that balance in a relationship??
 Quazi 100
Joined: 3/2/2008
Msg: 153
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she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/22/2009 4:57:30 PM
boinkboinkboink

Without prejudice...

I THINK that mindchatter's intent was mostly to point out that some of the information on this thread pertains to people with Borderline Personality Disorder, not Bipolar Disorder.

And she is absolutely right. Technically, Borderline Personality Disorder is a much more difficult disorder to treat, is not very responsive to medication, and the mood swings can be wild, and frequent. (Even a rapid-cycle bipolar has to be in a "mood" for a week for it to be considered a "swing". Borderlines can "swing" numerous times in a day-it's exhausting)

Bipolar is very treatable-except if the person doesn't want to comply....side effects, weight gain, going on and off meds (it's better to just not take them), using alcohol, and other substances with meds....all these things can make a bipolar seem very difficult. And it can be, until the proper dosage and combination of meds is found. Once the jackpot is hit, the sailing should be smooth for a while, as long as one keeps the status quo. I've been on the same meds for five years, and I have no problem until something new is added and that can be a vitamin pill....yes, that will throw my system off for a while.

Some insurance companies will not cover Borderline....we are considered untreatable...so the Doctor will call the illness Bipolar Disorder....because it can be treated with medication and therapy. That's another reason for "misdiagnosis".

I understand that your motivation and intent were honorable, in your failed relationship. Some of us were subjected to that behaviour by our parents. In that case, you're STUCK...nothing can be done. You went through it, you got out of it, and now, HOPEFULLY you will be able to recognize red flags, and avoid finding yourself in the same position again.
 boinkboinkboink
Joined: 3/20/2009
Msg: 154
she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/22/2009 6:04:25 PM
Quazi,

When she makes this statement, "We're all individuals and deserve a fair shake based on our own merits and not what media and misinformation and society's stigma has to say about it", she is completely discrediting those of us who have actually experienced those individuals with this illness. Whether you or she chooses to acknowledge this, more often than not, the behavior of BP is extremely brutal - so brutal that they are often dangerous. A bipolar person, in an extreme case, will take a gun to his family. I have a close famly friend whose son did precisely this. This is no minor illness. Those individuals who have not experience this illness before MUST step very carefully with a person who acknowledges having this illness. I would also suggest that those less extreme cases may not be BP. They may simply be suffering from depression, misdiagnosed, or may be suffering from abuse and acting out in reaction to this abuse. For example, a person overwhelmed by a very controlling person may also demonstrate BP type behavior, but completely lose that behavior once seperated from that person.
 Quazi 100
Joined: 3/2/2008
Msg: 158
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she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/22/2009 7:01:41 PM

When she makes this statement, "We're all individuals and deserve a fair shake based on our own merits and not what media and misinformation and society's stigma has to say about it", she is completely discrediting those of us who have actually experienced those individuals with this illness. Whether you or she chooses to acknowledge this, more often than not, the behavior of BP is extremely brutal - so brutal that they are often dangerous. A bipolar person, in an extreme case, will take a gun to his family. I have a close famly friend whose son did precisely this. This is no minor illness. Those individuals who have not experience this illness before MUST step very carefully with a person who acknowledges having this illness. I would also suggest that those less extreme cases may not be BP. They may simply be suffering from depression, misdiagnosed, or may be suffering from abuse and acting out in reaction to this abuse. For example, a person overwhelmed by a very controlling person may also demonstrate BP type behavior, but completely lose that behavior once seperated from that person.


She is not discrediting anyone. She is stating that bipolar comes in many different sizes and shapes...varying degrees of severity. YOU ARE DOING EXACTLY WHAT SHE IS COMPLAINING ABOUT. I am bipolarII, and I know several people who are bipolar...manias include wild shopping sprees, creativity, lots of furniture re-arranging, having sex whenever possible....depressions usually include sleep, and not much else. No violence...no one got hurt. Are you sure that this person who took a gun to his family didn't have BPD and wasn't bipolar at all? "Extremely brutal sounds much more Borderline Personality Disorder than Bipolar to me. I have both, please don't tell me I'm wrong. What are you basing your alternate "diagnosis" on. Have you done research? Studied criteria? Please show me some facts.



Why might not less extreme cases be bipolar?
 boinkboinkboink
Joined: 3/20/2009
Msg: 159
she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/22/2009 8:52:46 PM
"Bipolar disorder is characterized by extreme variations in mood, from mania and/or irritability to depression. Alterations in mood (commonly referred to as "mood swings") between mania and depression can be frightening and disturbing for persons who have this disorder as well as family members and those people who know and work with them. Manic episodes can be especially distressing because they are often associated with high-risk behaviors like substance abuse, sexual promiscuity, immoderate spending, VIOLENT BEHAVIOR, and disregard for danger. The capacity for empathy is also typically reduced or absent, leaving family members and others without the usual interpersonal protections and understandings that empathy (knowing how our words and actions affect others) provides."

http://www.depressioncenter.org/depressive_disorders/bipolar.asp

"Patients usually describe BIPOLAR ANXIETY as an agitated condition during which you may lose your normal capacity of rational thinking and reasonable judgment."

http://www.phobia-fear-release.com/bipolar-anxiety.html

There are tons of sources linking violence with bipolar disorder.

Quazi, I have personally experienced the consequenes of this violent behavior. You, on the other hand are the one who is sick with this illness. The very nature of this illness denies you the ability to truly understand yourself. This is nothing against you as an individual; this is the reality of this illness.

Step very carefully with these people and understand very clearly how extreme their particular case is.
 Writemindedlefty
Joined: 8/16/2009
Msg: 160
she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/22/2009 9:29:50 PM
Violent behavior is not the rule of thumb for starters.

This also only happens when the person is NOT medicated.

It is NOT a daily thing that is triggered by typical social interactions where one has to walk on eggshells. THAT would be borderline personality.

Trying to spook people seems to be your main motive here.

Fortunately, the more intelligent crowd will weigh the evidence and facts and biases carefully before casting us all off as violent thugs.

Good luck in the pond.
 boinkboinkboink
Joined: 3/20/2009
Msg: 163
she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/22/2009 10:43:47 PM
http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2009/06/07/bipolar-domestic-violence/

For any one person in the general population with anger issues, if he is bipolar he is more likely to act on those issues in a violent manner.

Bipolar disorder exaggerates existing problems. Therefore any caution that you might have with any one "normal" individual must be far greater with one who suffers from this illness.


This also only happens when the person is NOT medicated.


Most bipolar people resist taking their drugs.]


... casting us all off as violent thugs.


I most certainly did NOT attempt to do this. Please, get your emotions under control. You're reacting.
 Writemindedlefty
Joined: 8/16/2009
Msg: 164
she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/22/2009 11:06:45 PM

Please, get your emotions under control. You're reacting.


LOL.

Save your bait for more worthy fish in the pond. ;)

Sorry for the experience you've had though.
 Quazi 100
Joined: 3/2/2008
Msg: 166
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she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/23/2009 11:08:08 AM
boinkboink


Manic episodes can be especially distressing because they are often associated with high-risk behaviors like substance abuse, sexual promiscuity, immoderate spending, VIOLENT BEHAVIOR, and disregard for danger. The capacity for empathy is also typically reduced or absent, leaving family members and others without the usual interpersonal protections and understandings that empathy (knowing how our words and actions affect others) provides."


This would be the BLACK BOX warning about bipolar disorder, similar to what you would find on any medication.

Example:

Any Antidepressant...may cause depression, mania, constipation, diarrhea....they list every "symptom" that their research groups had...as you can see, the symptoms can go from one extreme to another...

No one is saying that NO bipolar EVER gets violent. And look where it's listed...second from last....substance abuse is first.

Most people that I know that are bipolar, take huge risks with their own lives.....the danger aspect of some people's brain just takes a vacation....my ex-boyfriend wanted to make love to his wife on the yellow line down the middle of the road....when she said no, he took her into a ditch....while a party was going on around them.

I made up a new slogan for Nike, I thought it was better than "Just Do It"...I was trying to get a flight to New York......

Neither my ex-boyfriend, or I had been diagnosed when these things happened. After being diagnosed, and medicated, stuff like that doesn't happen anymore. Sometimes another drug can stop our medication from working properly. When that happens, I know almost immediately, because I start thinking "differently" than usual. I stop whatever is new, and get my ass to the Doctor. Please don't tell me that I don't know, because I suffer from the illness. I know within hours of my behaviour changing. And I hate being manic.....I did a bad number on my life while manic. I know by what's going on in my head, that I'm becoming manic, WAY before you would see any outward change.

Your BLACK BOX warning is just that....a "cover ALL the bases " warning.
 Quazi 100
Joined: 3/2/2008
Msg: 167
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she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/23/2009 11:18:54 AM

Quazi, I have personally experienced the consequenes of this violent behavior. You, on the other hand are the one who is sick with this illness. The very nature of this illness denies you the ability to truly understand yourself. This is nothing against you as an individual; this is the reality of this illness.


Have you looked at the criteria for BPD?

Violent behaviour is more associated with BPD than bipolar.

BPD violent behaviour would LIKELY be more viscious than bipolar violence. More PERSONAL.
 easy2like
Joined: 4/18/2006
Msg: 169
experience with bipolarism
Posted: 8/23/2009 1:07:47 PM
AMBITIOUS LIBRA

the condition can be caused by trauma, genetics, post traumatic stress disorder, but the net result is that there is a change in the morphology of the brain

used to be called "manic depression"

EASILY TREATED WITH LITHIUM CARBONATE

450 mg twice day

however, L/C has to be monitored by testing blood levels of liver enzymes and renal function to ensure that no damage to those organs is occurring

there are additional treatments on the market now too

lithium is a highly flammable (nearly epxlosive) metal which -- like sodium -- will react with water to ignite BUT is in contact with dilute carbolic acid or carbon dioxide it can produce lithium carbonate

an example of a highly combustible metal combining with the same substance resulting in a great product is so-called "baking soda"

baking soda is sodium bicarbonate -- madethe same way and it is used to bathe babies, sooth burns, settle acid stomach, soak up odors, etc., so even tho the process sounds diabolical it results in a very useful compound.

contact me if you wanna talk about it -- lots of experience with it and IT IS ALL GOOD!!
 movealongbetty
Joined: 6/23/2009
Msg: 170
she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/23/2009 1:47:35 PM
My ex is bipolar. The last 2 years of our marriage were hell! He's paranoid & a schizophrnic. He would instigate arguments,& then twist my words around when I would defend myself . He wasn't physically abusive....thank God...but he was verbally abusive,at times. He was very loving & caring when things went his way. It was like living in a "si-fi movie"! Sad part is,that they don't change,wheather on meds or not. I feel for you sweetie.....Good luck!
 Writemindedlefty
Joined: 8/16/2009
Msg: 172
experience with bipolarism
Posted: 8/23/2009 2:42:29 PM
It IS easily treated with LC.

IF it's the proper diagnosis.

Often, people are misdiagnosed...
 Quazi 100
Joined: 3/2/2008
Msg: 173
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she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/23/2009 3:38:10 PM

My ex is bipolar. The last 2 years of our marriage were hell! He's paranoid & a schizophrnic. He would instigate arguments,& then twist my words around when I would defend myself . He wasn't physically abusive....thank God...but he was verbally abusive,at times. He was very loving & caring when things went his way. It was like living in a "si-fi movie"! Sad part is,that they don't change,wheather on meds or not. I feel for you sweetie.....Good luck!


Chances are, if absolutely nothing is any different, when the person is on meds....the meds are doing nothing.....and the person has been misdiagnosed.

No change whatsoever=barking up the wrong tree.
 easy2like
Joined: 4/18/2006
Msg: 174
experience with bipolarism
Posted: 8/23/2009 3:56:16 PM
Amazed:

maybe it is dealing with u that has him in problem land

LC is a readily available compound that has been used for several decades and if the person is bipolar it works and works well. Try 2 understand -- the disorder is not a psychological issue but a morphological, physiological, and anatomical issue.

If a person is BP then lithium works. If your ex or whoever he is has that many medications he is being malpracticed upon if he has BP or else he does not have the disorder.

BP is like PTSD -- for a long time it was consideed to be a "syndrome" when in fact it has a morphological origin.

PTSD for example was considered to be a result of one's inability to adjust to trauma but it has been learned that PTSD results from CHANGES in the brain stem and cerbral cortex that can be detected with a CT scan. Luckily some peope had CT's before a trauma and then later had a CT for diagnostic purposes and it was discovered that their brain stem and cortex had enlared hypersensitive areas.

For the sake of veterans returning from overseas this has been a real boon and much of the current research focuses upon BP and PTSD in returning veterans. Care to make fun of them too? All they did was go overseas (since no one here volunteered for military sevice or overseas duty) and have to kill people and watch friends being killed.

what a hoot -- betcha have a laff on that one huh?

anyway -- LC is being used to help treat BP especially when coupled with PTSD with amazing results.

BP is now undertsood as being the reult of morphology i.e. from trauma, closed head injuries, etc., so if your ex has such problems then he needs a 2d and 3d opinion becaase something is worng

The real Q is WHAT IS WRONG WITH YOU THAT YOU WOULD MAKE FUN OF HIM OR ANYONE WITH SUCH A PROBLEM.

therapy -- think therapy.

4 U!!

BTW in addition to the ones listed by someone in a post above Sam Houston was bipolar -- all he did was defeat Mexico and create the Republic of Texas but I guess that counts litle.

And don't forget George Patton -- hit his head in 1938 playing polo and had a CHI and developed BP but was germany's worst nightmare-- the germans feared him so much that they held units in reserve after D-Day in case Patton took charge. Zany, yes, but BP due to head trauma and highly effective in his work.

Ask Rommel.
 kpooks
Joined: 12/23/2008
Msg: 176
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she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/28/2009 12:36:36 PM
Awww...ANOTHER one bipolar? Man, they're dropping like flies.

A former buddy of mine has bipolarism, and I always knew he was secretive, paranoid and socially inept, but, when I "challenged" him on his awful behavior toward his GF, he really jumped down my throat. We haven't spoken in over 2 years, even after I left him a phone message apologizing for losing my temper (I wonder if I have the condition myself). His GF and I speak (as friends). She kicks him out of the house for being lazy and antagonistic every 6 months or so, then takes him back within 2 months. He's very caring and charismatic...when he wants to be.

I agree, your dad shouldn't marry her, but life is full of tough choices, and, when it comes to contact with his only daughter or his libido, he'll probably choose his libido (these BPs are hyper-sexual).

Yep, the only thing you can do is step back. If his life is meant to be ruined, let it happen. Just tell him you'll always love him but you won't be there to help him pick up the pieces.
 Quazi 100
Joined: 3/2/2008
Msg: 177
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she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/28/2009 5:31:52 PM
ammazzed....


If a bipolar person goes untreated for a period of years, could he or she begin to experience rapid cycling, or become treatment-resistant? If stressors initially set off episodes, in time could episodes appear without any such triggers? Research says the answer to all these questions is yes, and the reason may be a process that has been termed "kindling."

The phenomenon of kindling in epilepsy was first discovered by accident by researcher Graham Goddard in 1967. Goddard was studying the learning process in rats, and part of his studies included electrical stimulation of the rats' brains at a very low intensity, too low to cause any type of convulsing. What he found was that after a couple of weeks of this treatment, the rats did experience convulsions when the stimulation was applied. Their brains had become sensitized to electricity, and even months later, one of these rats would convulse when stimulated (History, 1998). Goddard and others later demonstrated that it was possible to induce kindling chemically as well (Hargreaves, 1996.)

The name "kindling" was chosen because the process was likened to a log fire. The log itself, while it might be suitable fuel for a fire, is very hard to set afire in the first place. But surround it by smaller, easy to light pieces of wood - kindling - and set these blazing, and soon the log itself will catch fire. Dr. Robert M. Post of the National Institute of Mental Health (USA) is credited with first applying the kindling model to bipolar disorder (NARSAD)...


Sounds kinda like how PTSD works to me......


It always amazes me when someone acts like they know that one medication is effective for everyone and just taking one pill is a cure. We aren't talking about an infection that just requires an antibiotic. We are talking about a medical condition that involves the brain and the workings of it. There is never one pill fits all for mental illness.


"The ancient Greeks and Romans coined the terms “mania” and “melancholia” and used waters of northern Italian spas to treat agitated or euphoric patients—and in a forecast of things to come—believed that lithium salts were absorbed into the body as a naturally occurring mineral."

I can find lots more references like the one above, if you like.....lithium has been used for centuries to alleviate "mania" and "melancholia".....this is not ONE person's opinion. Lithium is not a CURE for anything, but a large percentage of bipolar people, rely on it to stabilize their mood, and as far as I know, it is STILL the first line defence used by the medical community.
 Quazi 100
Joined: 3/2/2008
Msg: 179
view profile
History
she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/28/2009 6:30:20 PM
I don't believe that I said that everyone can be treated with lithium. I said that a large PERCENTAGE of people with bipolar disorder have success with lithium. As with anything in life, nothing is GUARANTEED. If there are other factors involved, or if the person cannot take lithium for some reason, then other avenues are pursued.


inflated self-esteem or grandiosity

decreased need for sleep (e.g., feels rested after only 3 hours of sleep)

more talkative than usual or pressure to keep talking

flight of ideas or subjective experience that thoughts are racing

distractibility (i.e., attention too easily drawn to unimportant or irrelevant external stimuli)

increase in goal-directed activity (either socially, at work or school, or sexually) or psychomotor agitation

excessive involvement in pleasurable activities that have a high potential for painful consequences (e.g., engaging in unrestrained buying sprees, sexual indiscretions, or foolish business investments)



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

frantic efforts to avoid real or imagined abandonment. Note: Do not include suicidal or self-mutilating behavior covered in Criterion 5. 2. a pattern of unstable and intense interpersonal relationships characterized by alternating between extremes of idealization and devaluation.
3. identity disturbance: markedly and persistently unstable self-image or sense of self.
4. impulsivity in at least two areas that are potentially self-damaging (e.g., spending, sex, substance abuse, reckless driving, binge eating). Note: Do not include suicidal or self-mutilating behavior covered in Criterion 5.
5. recurrent suicidal behavior, gestures, or threats, or self-mutilating behavior
6. affective instability due to a marked reactivity of mood (e.g., intense episodic dysphoria, irritability, or anxiety usually lasting a few hours and only rarely more than a few days).
7. chronic feelings of emptiness
8. inappropriate, intense anger or difficulty controlling anger (e.g., frequent displays of temper, constant anger, recurrent physical fights)
9. transient, stress-related paranoid ideation or severe dissociative symptoms

Above, are criteria for two mental "disorders". The first set is bipolar "mania". The second is "borderline personality disorder". If the people you have met are not being effectively treated, and still have "episodes", and if they ARE taking their medication properly....chances are, they have been misdiagnosed....bipolar, and borderline personality disorder are frequently mixed up.
 Writemindedlefty
Joined: 8/16/2009
Msg: 180
she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/29/2009 5:33:41 PM

There are many violent people out there and most commiting violence are not bi-polar
Why do we have 4 out of every 5 women abused in this country? Mental illness? That many men are mentally ill? Some people are just mean and bad, has nothing to do with the issue


Bingo!

+10
 Quazi 100
Joined: 3/2/2008
Msg: 183
view profile
History
she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/30/2009 12:02:05 PM
And because I feel I was attacked on here and like I said, I know what my ex is like. My almost 18 year old son had a talk with the ex today. Apparently the latest meds aren't working either. He was ready to kill himself this week. He has been married to his current wife since April. As I don't speak to him at all, yeah, I'd have to say that he has some real problems mentally/chemically and I really don't know at 60 they will ever be resolved.


I don't believe that anyone has attacked you, ammazzed....what I personally have been trying to say, is that your ex doesn't fit the "bipolar" diagnosis. From your posts, my personal guess would be Borderline Personality Disorder. Even if your ex has been diagnosed "bipolar", I think he's been misdiagnosed. Being both BP, and BPD myself, taking what you said in your last post....suicidal, and "latest meds aren't working" says BPD not bipolar.

Bipolar individuals get a bad rap by being "lumped" together with BPD individuals. BPD is a more "serious" disorder, in that it deals with the personality, not moods.

Both BP, and BPD.....from the outside, may look the same. On the inside, they are totally different.

I'm not disqualifying bipolar as being a walk in the park....far from it. However, there are a multitude of bipolar people who accept, and take responsibility for their disorder.
 Quazi 100
Joined: 3/2/2008
Msg: 186
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she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 8/30/2009 4:52:17 PM
ammazzed....

Yes, the first poster was rude to you.

I looked up kindling. I believe that it happens....alot.

I actually read the article that you quoted from. Without prejudice, the article appeared to be about getting diagnosed early, before "kindling" made the bipolar disorder harder to manage. A more severe degree of disorder is always going to be more difficult to manage, that goes without saying.

I also realize that not everyone can get benefit from one drug, or one method of treatment.

Drugs, and treatment methods are only part of the equation...they can only do so much. The bipolar individual has to want to get better (truly), or all the medication, and therapy in the world won't "do it" for them.
 kewlhand75
Joined: 3/4/2007
Msg: 187
Re: Kindling
Posted: 9/15/2009 9:52:46 PM
Im interested in learning about this kindling ammazzed.. I went manic back in 2007 and havent had another episode since. Ive reduced stressful triggers and though im not against drug treatment, ive been managing fine without any drug intervention. I can see if i cant handle triggers such as stress than im at a greater potential of being manic again. One doctor ive been following is Dr. Jay Carter and certain things such as getting enough sleep and taking an essential amount of fatty acids are recommended. Personally i think if you manage these triggers that things dont necessarily get worse... Kindling has to be lit before it can burn. My look at it is to control the flame before it can get bigger.

Someone mentioned other than you ammazed bipolar doesnt include delusional thoughts... There are a few different bipolar, bipolar I, II and cyclothemia(i think) . i believe the bipolar I level is mania with levels of psychosis which may include Delusions and Hallucinations. I had some Delusions which i remember clearly of having but didnt hallucinate..(hear voices or see things)

if anyone wants to watch an informative video about bipolar check this out : http://www.bipolarlight.com/index2.html
 Stafford_Jim
Joined: 8/12/2009
Msg: 188
view profile
History
she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 9/15/2009 10:08:23 PM
The only thing I know about it is a friend of mine has it. She's very well adjusted though and admits it is solely due to her medications.

She had to go through a few different meds before the doctors found one that would work on her. Before she told me about that I saw her as moody at times, but never a bad, mean, or dangerous person. I never guessed she was bipolar, and I guess I just attributed her mild moodiness to her monthly visitor.

Her only fear is that if she were ever to lose her insurance and ability to pay for her meds that she would lose what the good life the meds have given her back. She has a really nice boyfriend and has her life together pretty well, better than most, 'stable' people I know.
 Quazi 100
Joined: 3/2/2008
Msg: 189
view profile
History
she has been diagnosed with bipolarism
Posted: 9/16/2009 9:58:20 AM

Her only fear is that if she were ever to lose her insurance and ability to pay for her meds that she would lose what the good life the meds have given her back. She has a really nice boyfriend and has her life together pretty well, better than most, 'stable' people I know.


This doesn't surprise me, stafford jim....

Since I have stabilized my moods (for the most part, nothing is ever perfect) I work much harder at everything than I used to.

Especially relationships. I don't take them for granted anymore. They take work, and give and take, and compromise....

I used to think that all I had to do was "show up"......I was wrong....very wrong....
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