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 capegardengirl
Joined: 4/29/2006
Msg: 159
Why do so few men take part in yoga.?Page 6 of 10    (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10)
"Do overdo things and the gains in those areas will come"
"The body needs a balance of strength and flexibility"
Exackly...Most yoga teachers say this all the time in classes and demonstrate how to do that...
Thats what I already said....A yoga teacher guiding one thru that and cautioning how to make that balance will say all that is the key and much better than simple weight lighting alone without that guidance.
 TheDao
Joined: 8/1/2009
Msg: 160
Why do so few men take part in yoga.?
Posted: 8/10/2009 7:01:40 PM
I do falun gong so there's no point is doing yoga.
 thatnickguy
Joined: 7/17/2008
Msg: 161
Why do so few men take part in yoga.?
Posted: 8/13/2009 7:53:28 AM
Personally, I love it. There's a DVD that I use at home that, by the end of the eighty minutes, I'm drenching in sweat. To say that this great exercise is for women only is ridiculous, because it's a great workout.
 Vanders Mark
Joined: 11/4/2009
Msg: 163
Why do so few men take part in yoga.?
Posted: 11/12/2009 11:38:18 PM
One of the main goals of anybody who's halfway serious about yoga is to be unaffected by the fluctuations of the mind...in other words...mental & emotional stability & balance....

If you ask me...I'd say that's the pinnacle of masculinity
 Edsta
Joined: 7/19/2008
Msg: 164
Why do so few men take part in yoga.?
Posted: 11/13/2009 3:27:12 AM

One of the main goals of anybody who's halfway serious about yoga is to be unaffected by the fluctuations of the mind..


Yes! It's commonly referred to as "equanimity" in the yogic and Buddhist traditions.

Basically the opposite of the drama queens that most yoga-disparaging, self-proclaimed "masculine" men actually are, LOL.

 Vanders Mark
Joined: 11/4/2009
Msg: 166
Why do so few men take part in yoga.?
Posted: 11/15/2009 11:16:06 AM

The reason I wouldn't do a class is because I know I'd suck at it.


If you're really interested in giving yoga a proper go...look for a studio that focuses on the Iyengar method...it truely is for everyone...I've got a disability and I'm still making progress...my teachers are really good at offering alternatives that allow me to work within my own limitations and still push for progress....

Look for teachers certified in the Iyengar method.

...and from my experience...an Iyengar class would be filled with women around your age...so it would be perfect for you....I gotta start trolling the hot yoga studios around town and start converting some younger gals to the Iyengar method...
 Scott3995
Joined: 11/7/2009
Msg: 167
Why do so few men take part in yoga.?
Posted: 11/15/2009 11:23:53 AM
You know what's worse than a man practicing yoga? ..........................Having to his his father that his sons gay.
 James Bottomtooth III
Joined: 5/19/2008
Msg: 168
Why do so few men take part in yoga.?
Posted: 11/15/2009 11:39:55 AM

You know what's worse than a man practicing yoga?

Yep.

A homophobic bodybuilder with poor spelling and grammar skills trying to be funny.
 InkyP
Joined: 10/27/2009
Msg: 169
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Why do so few men take part in yoga.?
Posted: 11/19/2009 3:58:27 PM


Yoga has saved my shoulders and back SO I COULD DO WEIGHT TRAINING!

Nothing more relaxing then an hour yoga class in the evening.
 Living Dharma
Joined: 10/16/2009
Msg: 170
Why do so few men take part in yoga.?
Posted: 11/21/2009 4:02:33 PM

I read that in India yoga is mainly partaken of by men, so why is the opposite true here in the west.?

Is it not seen as 'macho' enough to exercise in this way by the majority of men.?


I would say that the differences in culture have a lot to do with why yoga is more popular with men in India than it is with men in the West.

Yoga is an art, a science and a philosophy in countries like India. In essence it can be viewed as a way of life much like martial arts are for some Asian cultures.

In Yogic philosophy, Patanjali outlines an eight step path to enlightenment. Yoga as taught in the West focuses predominantly on step three (asanas - physical poses with breathwork). With yoga being more of a philosophy/way of life in India that has been around for thousands of years, it's practice is more widely accepted by both men and woman in my opinion.

Yoga as a form of exercise in the West is a fairly new concept in it's infancy (decades compared to many centuries). It takes patience to learn and time to experience the benefits. It also requires flexibility. Finally it is more of a supportive activity than a competitive activity. Perhaps in Western culture, these are aspects that attract women more than men.
 James Bottomtooth III
Joined: 5/19/2008
Msg: 172
Why do so few men take part in yoga.?
Posted: 11/22/2009 3:06:54 PM

Like in: Ooooh heeey Joe...I`m off to my yoga class. It just sounds gay/feminine/submissive which could be why it is not widely practiced by men in the US. Plus it does little to improve ones physical "appearance". One can practice yoga for decades and still look relatively average in physical appearance as opposed to practicing something more aggressive and sport a lean and athletic physique.


Actually the lifestyle does allot to improve ones appearance, but that is not the focus of yoga and is only a side effect.

I agree, most people would rather do something that makes them look better than actually improving their bodies and mind thus improving their quality of life.
 Vanders Mark
Joined: 11/4/2009
Msg: 173
Why do so few men take part in yoga.?
Posted: 11/22/2009 10:57:24 PM

It just sounds gay/feminine/submissive



One of the main goals of anybody who's halfway serious about yoga is to be unaffected by the fluctuations of the mind


How does that sound feminine? Isn't it usually women who are flying off the handle over nothing? It's good to break free from those automatic responses social conditioning has planted in your head....
 monalee1
Joined: 10/22/2007
Msg: 174
Why do so few men take part in yoga.?
Posted: 11/29/2009 1:21:30 AM
hi.. there is nothing gay about Rodney Yee or Batista doing one handed push ups, feet not touching the floor... strength, symmetry, balance, endurance,, all athletic things .. one of the main health benefits of yoga is the benefits to the body systems like digestion, lympth, elimination, respiratory etc... if you have ever watched the movie Roadhouse with the late Patrick Swayze you would remember the on going line " I thought that you would be bigger".... Bruce Lee, yum, not a girly guy at all imho... blessings for health
 James Bottomtooth III
Joined: 5/19/2008
Msg: 176
Why do so few men take part in yoga.?
Posted: 11/29/2009 11:30:40 AM

I looked at many of the profiles on this thread from people who claimed to being using yoga for many years now and the majority look average in physical appearance and quite a few actually are overweight and soft ( which is the new U.S. average anyway)

Basing your opinion of a lifestyle by observing a small group of individuals on a dating site without the ability to verify their involvement of said activity will more than not give you a false result.


Maybe it would be better to form that opinion based on what the experienced members at Yoga centres look like.

Although the only true way you could be objective is try it for yourself, and see what it can do for your body.

Without either of those you are just providing an uneducated opinion.




Plus I stand by my opinion that in regards to yoga & (physical appearance).....one does not get much bang for the yoga buck.

FYI -
Cost of Yoga = $0.00
 Vanders Mark
Joined: 11/4/2009
Msg: 178
Why do so few men take part in yoga.?
Posted: 11/29/2009 7:31:47 PM

Plus I stand by my opinion that in regards to yoga & (physical appearance).....one does not get much bang for the yoga buck.


So much focus on appearance...I guess you're right.
Maybe most men only work out to look good because they think it'll get them laid...they actually believe building up their ego is good for them, and would be completely lost and terrified if they took part in an activity that has the potential to surpress their ego.


Yes, yoga in conjunction with other techniques and disciplines one can have a very well balanced and rounded fitness regime


The key word there is balance.
Most men can't be bothered with true balance, it's all about doing the things that are considered "manly" by a culture that creates TV stations like Spike and garbage shows like Manswers...
 Edsta
Joined: 7/19/2008
Msg: 179
Why do so few men take part in yoga.?
Posted: 12/1/2009 8:36:40 PM

Most men can't be bothered with true balance, it's all about doing the things that are considered "manly" by a culture that creates TV stations like Spike and garbage shows like Manswers...


Yep...the hilarious fact is that any guy who spends a lot of time throwing around cliches involving the words "manly" or "masculine" is usually just plagued by deep sexual insecurity, poor thing. Underneath the tediously macho facade they are also more likely to be every bit as much "drama queens" as the stereotypical hysterical female or stereotypical homosexual, if not worse.
 ToughLuv1984
Joined: 9/2/2009
Msg: 180
Why do so few men take part in yoga.?
Posted: 12/2/2009 2:34:33 AM
I think its funny to see those huge guys at the gym who claim to be so 'fit' but they can't touch the side of their thighs because their biceps and triceps are so huge and touching their toes is an effort. Freakish.

Flexibility and endurance are two things that are oft neglected in today's gyms.
 scorpiomover
Joined: 4/19/2007
Msg: 181
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Why do so few men take part in yoga.?
Posted: 12/2/2009 6:19:03 PM
RE Msg: 178 by DaveB951:
My point exactly. You are suggesting that one has to go and see experienced upper level practioners to show any real signs of physical athleticism ? If that is the case.... then my point is well made. A few months of a mixture of dedicated calisthenics, weight lifting, cardio, track and field, etc. etc. will yield considerabe bang for the buck showing superb results in physical appearance without having to go and see experienced practioners.
That's what I thought, until I took up doing Yoga every day for a few months. I stopped looking at how I was doing and just got on with it. Suddenly after 2 months, I had ridiculous strength and ridiculous definition. I had already been told that even doing serious weights and gym, it would take 6 months to see any real difference, and they are much more intense than doing Yoga. Considering that I went on a "no pain" attittude when doing Yoga, I should have got almost no results. Yet, I got super-strong and super-fit, super-quick.
 monalee1
Joined: 10/22/2007
Msg: 182
Why do so few men take part in yoga.?
Posted: 12/2/2009 9:14:35 PM
^^^^^ this is the most maddening thing about any Truth, unless a person tries it first hand they can never really give accurate feedback, just opinions and assumptions... yoga does make you super strong, super fit, super quick... blessings
 Edsta
Joined: 7/19/2008
Msg: 183
Why do so few men take part in yoga.?
Posted: 12/2/2009 11:56:07 PM

I had already been told that even doing serious weights and gym, it would take 6 months to see any real difference,


In all fairness, with a competent trainer and a reasonable change in eating habits, most people see noticeable results from the gym within 2-3 months. Not saying they'll look like ripped gods, just different from where they were before.

The strength gains that yoga provides are mostly in the core muscles, though you do get better muscle tone throughout the body.

Visible and dramatic increases in muscle mass are much more easily gotten through weight training, if cosmetics is your main priority rather than holistic wellness.
 monalee1
Joined: 10/22/2007
Msg: 185
Why do so few men take part in yoga.?
Posted: 12/3/2009 8:46:15 PM
^^^ you may want to try Hatha yoga once too... when I worked at a fitness club the body builders who came to my yoga classes would ALWAYS tell me afterwards that they ~used~ to think that yoga was for sissies... try Hatha yoga for a month, 4 times a week and then judge... have you seen male yoga teachers in person??...blessings
 Dwayne2010
Joined: 4/19/2009
Msg: 187
Why do so few men take part in yoga.?
Posted: 12/4/2009 10:28:19 AM
I agree with batman. Same goes for aerobics. I don;t go because I think the woman are thinking that I am staring at them. IN my defence, I don't mean to look! I'm a guy. But still, I don;t want to make the girls uncomfortable.
 scorpiomover
Joined: 4/19/2007
Msg: 188
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Why do so few men take part in yoga.?
Posted: 12/4/2009 10:51:04 AM
RE Msg: 184 by Edsta:
In all fairness, with a competent trainer and a reasonable change in eating habits, most people see noticeable results from the gym within 2-3 months. Not saying they'll look like ripped gods, just different from where they were before.
That's what I thought too. But I got ripped enough that I walked into a room with a flat of women who'd known me for 6 months prior, took my shirt off, and they all gasped like they do at strippers. I was just doing the washing up, and I just took off my shirt to not get water on the sleeves. I had a T-shirt on anyway, so I wasn't exactly showing off. I also have a negative body image, so I didn't like the attention, ran out, put my shirt on, and came back in. But even I couldn't deny for well over 3 months afterwards, that women were looking at me like I was piece of T-bone steak. I've never heard of anyone getting that kind of huge difference so soon from the gym or weight training.


The strength gains that yoga provides are mostly in the core muscles, though you do get better muscle tone throughout the body.
That's what I thought as well. But then one day after I'd been training with Yoga for 2.5 months, I'd vaulted myself onto the fridge, which was about the same level as my waist. I thought that was pretty cool. The person I was talking to, also sat on the fridge, and we kept talking. After a few minutes, I glanced down, and suddenly noticed that I hadn't let my body down. For 2-4 minutes, I was supported entirely by my hands. That was absolutely amazing for me, to have that kind of muscle strength. But what really got me, was that I hadn't even noticed at all. Even when I'd noticed, I felt absolutely no strain whatsoever. It was like I could have quite happily spent the entire afternoon supporting my body on my hands. I didn't even get any cramp in the muscles after, or the next day, like I do when I've pushed myself. It was so within my limits to support my body with my hands, that it wasn't even an effort that would be noticed. Now, I don't know about you, but that sounds like serious muscle strength.

Bear in mind, though, that I was doing the opposite of what people tell you in the gym, and in Yoga classes. I decided to just take it slow, and not put myself under any pressure whatsoever. So although even in Yoga classes, you'll still hear "no pain, no gain", I was doing the opposite. I was saying "no pain, good, pain, any pain, bad". That also meant that I was doing the Yoga a low slower, to avoid pain. So I was taking 2.5 hours all in all, because I was so slow. Maybe the time was enough. But if you said to anyone that they should only lift 0.5kg, for 20 reps, but take an hour doing them, to experience as little pain as possible, and that they'd get ripped by that, I think they'd say you're insane. That's basically not that different from what I did. But then, I wasn't doing it to get ripped. I was doing it that way, because I always gave up after pain, and I didn't want to give up this time.

Visible and dramatic increases in muscle mass are much more easily gotten through weight training, if cosmetics is your main priority rather than holistic wellness.
I know a few body-builders. You don't build up mass that quickly without steroids. Even then, it will make muscles bigger, not stronger or that much more toned. Even if you want a 6-pack, it was a body-builder who told me that lateral crunches are the only gym exercise that will do it, and weight training just doesn't help for that at all.

However, weight training will make you bigger. If that is your goal, great. I know that women love muscles.

However, someone quoted a study on POF that said that women preferred muscular men. It was old hat, but annoying, so I decided to read the actual study. Turned out that the majority of the women voted for toned men over muscular men by a large extent, and only preferred muscular men over men with no muscles at all. So if you really want to have the cosmetic benefits of being more attractive by exercise, you're far better off with toned muscles, and disciplines like Yoga or Pilates will give you that.

But it depends on what type of women you are going for. If you are going for women who will drool over Sly or Arnie, then you want huge muscles. If you are going for women who like fit men, they'll usually prefer someone toned.
 Vanders Mark
Joined: 11/4/2009
Msg: 189
Why do so few men take part in yoga.?
Posted: 12/4/2009 12:33:17 PM

I know a few body-builders. You don't build up mass that quickly without steroids. Even then, it will make muscles bigger, not stronger


Body builders don't do efficient and functional exercises. Yes, you can build mass very quickly with a functional routine and if you eat LOTS. And it's strong mass...no water retention if you do it properly. I gained 10 lbs in three months after starting a functional strength training routine.

It's good to balance things out. Yoga is great for the entire body, physical as well as physiological, but there's no way in hell most yoga poses will give you the strength that pull ups can give you....mmmmaybe head stand and hand stand....

Dips, pull ups, hand stand pushups at the gym will help you with your yoga, and yoga will help your recovery from your gym routine...
 scorpiomover
Joined: 4/19/2007
Msg: 190
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Why do so few men take part in yoga.?
Posted: 12/4/2009 3:16:09 PM
RE Msg: 190 by Vanders Mark:
Body builders don't do efficient and functional exercises. Yes, you can build mass very quickly with a functional routine and if you eat LOTS. And it's strong mass...no water retention if you do it properly. I gained 10 lbs in three months after starting a functional strength training routine.
That sounds like a pretty good routine.

It's good to balance things out. Yoga is great for the entire body, physical as well as physiological, but there's no way in hell most yoga poses will give you the strength that pull ups can give you....mmmmaybe head stand and hand stand....
That's true, if you do it like many do, as if you were doing gym exercises, because it's then low-impact gym, and that's bound to build you up less than normal gym exercises which are designed for that. But it's not really meant to be done that way.

Yoga is designed to be a series of meditative poses that aim for balance and harmony, and that makes it the tortoise that outperforms the hare:

1) The emphasis is on holding a position constantly for several minutes, so you can meditate in the position, not in and out, and not pushing yourself as far as you can go quickly, and then letting go, as you cannot meditate all that well if you keep moving. This makes it isometric exercises, not isotonic exercises.

The body has 3 sets of muscles for 3 different purposes:
The first gives incredible power, for about 2 seconds, like when you lift an incredibly heavy weight.
The second kicks in after the first. It gives a lot of power, and can last for about 20 seconds, but it cannot give the incredible power that the first one did.
The third kicks in after the second. It gives very little power, but can last for as long as you have food in your body.
The body builds this way, as those are the 3 types of ways we use muscles, endurance with low power, short bursts of power, and extreme power but in incredibly short bursts. Each has the same power output overall, but spread over different speeds of output. So to build up, you need to build up your total power output. How you do that is not relevant, only that you do, as it will produce the same results throughout.

The significance is that if you hold a position like the plough for 2 minutes, you're supporting your back with your arms for 5 minutes. You cannot just let go, or you'll fall over. So your muscles are being worked to support 120 seconds of total power output. If you are doing pull-ups, the equivalent for pull-ups lasting 2 seconds each, is 60 reps. That's a lot. You will probably gain a lot, because you are pulling your whole body up. Maybe it's only 30 reps.

The difference is that the body can pace itself much, much easier, because Yoga consists of low impact endurance exercises. Because it's low impact, the body has time to instruct the liver to convert more carbs into energy, well before it hits a "wall". So you can keep going for hours without getting tired. That means that you can easily do a set of 1.5 hours, making an equivalent of over 1000 pull-ups without trying. You could count up the total reps you do in your session. But they aren't going to be anywhere near that in the early days, and Yoga already gets there, or close, in the beginning, because it's low impact.

Further, if the body has a bit more energy, it can go for a few more seconds on low impact, and so can easily extend each pose a few more seconds every few days. So it can accomplish the same as if you added 10 push-ups to your set every 3 days, forever, without any massive effort on your part. So for the more advanced practitioners, they will not only start out with a more powerful workout, but even their increases will be far greater than yours.

2) The emphasis is on holding a position comfortably, so that you can meditate in it, not pushing your body to it's total limit, because then it's too painful to concetrate on meditation. So there is an emphasis on not pushing yourself too much.

That has an effect that you rarely develop an injury via Yoga. So you don't need to take 6 weeks off for over-doing it every now and then. The low impact means that your body maintains a constant raised circulation, but doesn't burn itself out. So you often find that after Yoga, your body is raring to go. That's why it's often not a good idea to do Yoga just before bed, but at least a couple of hours before going to sleep.

But that also means you can do it every day, and this is encouraged, to ensure that you gain the benefits of meditation every single day. As a result, you can do a full workout every day. Gym exercises push your body, and they need time to restore the natural resources. So at most, you can work chest, then arms, then legs, meaning that your body only gets a total workout every 3 days, and even then, the workout is just not that consistent, and so much less impact overall.

3) The positions must be counter-balanced, one set to cover one side, then the other set to cover the other side. That's to ensure you are balanced in your meditation, and to ensure that you don't pull one side more than the other, and cause injury.

Thus, you do the shoulderstand, which focusses on the back of the legs, the torso, the spine and the arms, for a few minutes. Then you do the fish, which focusses on the front of the legs, the torso, the spine and the arms, for a few minutes. You can skip the shoulderstand and the fish if you don't have time. But if you do one, then you must do the other, because otherwise, you'll push the body one way, and not the other, and you'll put it seriously out of kilter.

The real problem with Yoga is the reason why gyms use isotonic exercises. When you lift a pull-up, you are only use one set of muscles. You use the corresponding set, to lower yourself. If you only use one side, then your muscles are seriously out of whack, and they don't work properly at all.

But, because Yoga is divided into pairs of poses, where each pair must both be done, or neither, you don't get the problem. First you work on one side, then the other. In pull-ups, it would be like lifting and holding the pull-up for 2 minutes. Then stopping and taking a few seconds as a breather. Then going back to the lifted position, lowering yourself to the lower position, and then holding that for 2 minutes. So by forming positions into pairs, you get the same benefits as the isotonics of the gym, but a much greater workout, with far less stress on the body, and no recovery time required.

As I said, it's the tortoise vs the hare, only because they are both working out on a regular basis, it's like a 100,000 mile race, that stretches over a year. In the first half day, the hare will make more ground, but because the tortoise works slowly but regularly, it makes a lot more ground every day, and over a year, it makes a heck of a lot more ground.

As a workout system, it's one of the most efficient I've ever found, but only so long as you do it in the ways that it was intended to do, and that's totally unlike the philosophy of exercise that is advertised in the West.

Dips, pull ups, hand stand pushups at the gym will help you with your yoga, and yoga will help your recovery from your gym routine...
Yoga will help with recovery. Gym exercises will help with yoga, provided you do the isotonic form where you just move into the position and then move out, without holding it for very long, because then you are using the same muscles that you are using for the gym. But if you're doing Yoga by holding positions, you're going to find that you just cannot hold it very long.
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