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 Merrylass
Joined: 12/30/2007
Msg: 206
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Very High IQPage 8 of 13    (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13)
Optimist54, you were perfectly clear. No idea why ^^^ seems to have trouble getting your point.
 wanderer1999
Joined: 2/10/2007
Msg: 208
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Very High IQ
Posted: 1/6/2009 2:01:37 PM
Well, sticking to the original OP's post and without getting into a long post addressing the many viewpoints on this forum (whose opinions run the gamut from well concieved to erroneous to outlandish), all I can state is my own thoughts and opinions.

I went through a streamed program for gifted children (from grade 4 through grade 11 when the program ended), where the minimum benchmark was a confirmed test score of 135.

While it was a gifted program, even within the program there was a broad spectrum of intelligence, ranging from the marginal to the brilliant. While some of my classmates excelled (one of my classmates ended up placing in the international Mathematics Olympiad and now teaches advanced Mathematics at Stanford, another became a successful Hedge Fund Manager, others became doctors, lawyers, screenwriters, etc), many ended up in relatively mediocre white collar professions and I wouldn't be surprised if a few ended up being the proverbial brilliant Starbucks Baristas or Taxicab drivers.

Having transitioned to the "normal" educational stream after so many years in gifted programs, I can say that the main differences between the two from my perspective was a combination of curriculum (the gifted program pushed forward more advanced material like Calculus 2 years earlier than the normal program did) and a different approach by instructors (greater emphasis on self-directed learning and projects).

That being said, many of the brighter students still found themselves bored to the point of stultification when covering "rote" materials.

My thought is that the main obstacle you will encounter with these children is the issue of boredom. For a person with a swift mind and memory, the rate at which they acquire, process and master information is far faster than people realize. Similarly, their ability to assimilate information quickly (as well as synthesize that information usefully) means that they will always be seeking a higher bar in terms of satisfaction when it comes to mastering a particular topic.

The real problem starts when they "outpace" the curriculum that has been laid out for them.

The only way to really make those topics exciting is to either make the topics sufficiently complex to challenge their minds, or to create a context to the information that is meaningful to them so that their intellectual curiousity is piqued.

For example, teaching someone probability is extraordinarily boring.. until you place the concept of statistics within a framework that they themselves find either useful or interesting. For example, if they have a penchant for games... taking statistics and having them apply those skills to real life probability problems such as those that take place when playing craps or poker, or analyzing the results of an election in terms of variance and deviation would challenge their intellectual capabilities and give them a reason to acquire and apply that knowledge.

Often, the way that information is presented in classrooms is in a way that is stale and clinical. While the idea of two trains approaching each other at different speeds may seem appropriate in terms of a context, if it were me, it would have been far more interesting if the problem were presented more along the lines of a real life contextual problem... for example, let's put a new twist on the old 2 trains problem...

a) You and your friend are on opposite sides of the city approximately 20 miles apart. You have a car and can take the highway, averaging 60 miles an hour. Your friend has to take the subway, which averages 35 miles per hour. It's 6pm and you have to get to a concert by 8pm that is located at the intersections of Oak and Elm. Assuming that you can drive from wherever you pick up your friend at an average speed of 25 miles per hour in the city, what is the best subway station to meet that will allow you the most time to get some dinner and still get to the concert on time? How much time will you have for dinner? What time would you get to the concert if you skipped dinner?

As for the idea of conforming to rules, this isn't just an issue of intelligence, but assuming that you believe this stems somewhat from their intelligence (perhaps they have learned a healthy disrespect for rules... not uncommon among my peers), then most likely they haven't formed a connection in their minds in terms of how it relates specifically to their particular set of goals.

For example, if you plan on being a musician, then the idea of mastering Algebra and Trigonometry becomes an abstract rather than a practical exercise.

In cases such as this, then you really have only a few options...

1) Let them figure it out. While getting into college/university is valuable, not everyone is destined to go on to higher education right after high school. They may desire to learn and explore the world on their first.

2) Attempt to get into a logical discussion regarding the ends... ie, form a connection between their own goals and objectives and the task at hand. For example, they may want to travel the world and don't see an application for University... until you point out that Students can travel on a special Student Visa and live and work abroad in many countries for up to 6 months, or that graduates with any University degree can take a course and get certified as an English teacher and use that as a means to fund their desire to travel. Another example would be to show that the ability to grasp higher mathematical concepts is useful should they wish to engage in high Finance, or that going on to education at higher institutions will expose them to a wide variety of people that they can form social connections with in order to further their goals.

3) Should it be acceptable withing your cultural context, you could simply pressure/guilt them into it. For example, obedience to parents is very highly valued in certain cultures and would simply require the parents to take a firm stand and "order" them to do so.

4) You could give them a research project and let them learn for themselves about the pro's and cons of education. Tell them that you'll respect whatever decision they choose, but that you want them to make an informed decision. Give them some guidelines on what you want them to research. For example have them examine careers by educational path (most don't realize how many careers require solid mathematics or writing skills), relative earning power, expected differences in lifespan, in-depth research on 4 or 5 careers and would include interviews, anecdotal and statistical research, and whatever else you might feel is relevant. If these kids are as smart as you say they are, they just might have some ideas in terms of what they want.

Finally, while intelligence is valuable, it is neither a free ticket, nor is it fair to expect that they'll use that potential to the maximum. While we often hope for the maximum potential for our children, sometimes the question is more about happiness. The human race is full of underachievement... we just don't hear about it all that often.

Wanderer
 Merrylass
Joined: 12/30/2007
Msg: 210
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Very High IQ
Posted: 1/6/2009 7:11:29 PM

IQ is not knowledge. Learn to read.


Right back atcha, bud. Nobody said it was.
 jonash2007
Joined: 7/11/2007
Msg: 212
Very High IQ
Posted: 1/6/2009 9:16:13 PM
I would think talking to their parents would be a good start. And reminders that they won't get far in life if they don't follow at least some rules. I had to learn that over time and I still don't like to follow the rules.
 10of6
Joined: 8/27/2008
Msg: 215
Very High IQ
Posted: 1/9/2009 4:26:22 PM
I really enjoyed the John Travolta movie, "Phenomenon."
 hurricane hanna
Joined: 9/4/2008
Msg: 217
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Very High IQ
Posted: 1/11/2009 6:36:14 AM
I don't agree with you. Usually, a little tweaking of posts will allow them to stay onboard, and people will understand your meaning and benefit from hearing your point of view. Please don't be pressured into not posting.

Every bulletin board has different rules and different moderators. Some may have stricter ideas about what's allowed than others. It's just a matter of trying to figure out how to play on each web site.

Internet bulletin boards have technical problems from time to time too. If a whole page disappears, it's not always because a moderator intentionally removed it. Working with computers, I know it's often very common to be noodling along, doing maintenance tasks on the computer, and suddenly think, 'oh no, did I just hit that key, did I really do that?' and not being able to undo it. Too, web sites just lose saved information from time to time.

And ah...with myself, I often find...PLBKAC...problem lies between keyboard and chair...if I can't find something, I may not be looking for it correctly. I try not to get too fussed about any of it. If I look out my back door I know why everything in my yard is there, LOL, that all ends in the world of computers, LOL!
 hurricane hanna
Joined: 9/4/2008
Msg: 219
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Very High IQ
Posted: 1/11/2009 10:21:02 AM
Quite true, but if it is some censorship, I hope that rather than being turned off about commenting, that you'd just find a way to squeak past censorship. The sad thing about internet bulletin boards is they often wind up being a collection of 'people who agree with eachother' who just reinforce eachother's beliefs, rather than finding out how many different points of view there are out there and learning to coexist with them.
 bleeptwo
Joined: 11/29/2005
Msg: 221
Very High IQ
Posted: 1/17/2009 3:42:14 AM
cool post and I personaly take offense to some silly rules on posting that some moderators over use there POF given powers. Sometimes people with High IQ I mean very high are so out there we can not relate. hell at 136 to 145 as I have been tested at I sometimes get lost talking to someone of less intel but then again smarter people get lost talking to me.
 bleeptwo
Joined: 11/29/2005
Msg: 222
Very High IQ
Posted: 1/17/2009 3:43:07 AM
Yes true to who they do that sometimes. Absolute power corrupts absolutely
 compleat_man
Joined: 10/3/2008
Msg: 223
Very High IQ
Posted: 1/17/2009 8:39:34 AM
my IQ has been tested at 569

I can't even relate to any of these posts.

LMFAO
 Tomosama
Joined: 1/13/2009
Msg: 227
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Posted: 1/17/2009 4:48:07 PM
Yeah, you are trying to inspire them to learn, not teach them facts.

The idea is to sell them on learning, make it fun or somehow engaging. I had one teacher that really grabbed my attention by involving us in class projects that were more "hands-on".

This worked because when I was younger I could care less about high school, but I was bored as hell. The classes where there was something moderately entertaining or that had something I found interesting was the class I participated in.

It really depends on what sort of subject you teach....?
 Tomosama
Joined: 1/13/2009
Msg: 229
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Very High IQ
Posted: 1/17/2009 8:50:58 PM
Also there is a considerable discussion concerning the efficacy of I.Q. tests. The very nature of Intelligence is assumed and that's something we simply don't understand.

I also have to disagree with vakyxclone....these are teenagers. You can't reason with them like they are rational human beings. These are fleshy bags of hormonal rebellion under incarceration assailed on all sides by things they don't care to know as they are immersed amongst individuals who reward behavior that is more rebellious and apathetic than their own. They are barely human at this point - and as figures in authority you can't relate to them without diminishing the very authority which can be used to compel them to listen.

Compulsory education is terrible and only serves to devalue the currency that a diploma would give you. This is the problem when you have compulsory education, the students that want to learn can never be given the attention they deserve because the students that have the most potential have to be engaged. Only in a society where education is valued due to scarcity or demand will you have both.

So yeah, don't reason with them, just try to trick them into wanting to learn to avoid boredom. Offer them two alternatives, they can either copy something over and over 20 times before the period is over or they can do this activity. Either way, if they don't turn in something at the end of the day they have to stay after school for detention for an hour...while you watch them copy something over 40 times over and over.

*shrugs* I bet you they'll do the activity.
 10of6
Joined: 8/27/2008
Msg: 232
Very High IQ
Posted: 1/18/2009 7:35:15 AM
^^^^^^ I am forming the "UberMegaMensa Club," in which I am the sole member, and the only one good enough, smart enough and doggone it loved by all enough to be a member.
 Ubiquitous.
Joined: 11/7/2009
Msg: 237
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Posted: 10/26/2010 4:20:10 PM
Just popping in to say that manipulative, arrogant, presumptuous folks like the OP make institutions like public schooling so freaking awful sometimes.

Efforts to force children to conform to your values is both corrupt and morally bankrupt. Especially when such values are as arbitrary as "homework" and "getting into college".

If these kids don't value wasting time doing busywork at home that does absolutely nothing to stimulate them or expand their minds, then they aren't going to do it. If you want them to do things that you think are more intellectually beneficial, you are going to have to do two things: Respect them and their desire to act upon their values and get creative by finding things that interest them and are mind-expanding. Perhaps after-school projects or assignments specifically tailored to them/their abilities.

Those always worked for me.
 Ubiquitous.
Joined: 11/7/2009
Msg: 238
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Very High IQ
Posted: 10/27/2010 1:46:53 AM
I... can't tell if you're being sarcastic or not. I'm thinking yes.
 hungry_joe
Joined: 6/24/2006
Msg: 239
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Posted: 11/4/2010 3:15:26 PM
As an areospace professional I second the above remarks. Sloppy is not tolerated. You don't go to school necessarily to "learn" things but to show that you have the drive to start something then finish it. This is why he would've gotten promoted. But it also shows your potential to learn and potential to lead, because you're willing to see a task to the end.

Gadget-doc out.
 sexyisback!
Joined: 9/14/2010
Msg: 240
Very High IQ
Posted: 11/5/2010 11:31:43 AM
I think that every single psoter on POF forums has an IQ > 150 .

at least according to their own evaluation..
 hungry_joe
Joined: 6/24/2006
Msg: 241
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Posted: 11/5/2010 2:15:46 PM
I doubt I have one greater then 150 or even at 150. I'm bright I know that but not a genious by any account.
 hungry_joe
Joined: 6/24/2006
Msg: 242
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Posted: 11/5/2010 2:17:39 PM
Doubts that I have and IQ greater then 150 or even at 150, though I am bright. Now off to go pack so I can destroy some brain cells at my Alma Maters home comming game.
 Twilightslove
Joined: 12/9/2008
Msg: 243
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Very High IQ
Posted: 11/6/2010 11:29:46 PM
I was searching for something earlier and came across this article. It made me wonder if these boys had very many friends themselves and how they got a long with others in general.

The article that I found stated that people with high intellectual IQ's sometimes have low emotional IQ's. Here's the article:


There are a number of things you can do. A lot of kids don't have natural social skills. Being intellectually bright is not the same thing as being emotionally intelligent. In fact, quite a number of people with high I.Q. happen to have very low E.Q. (emotional intelligence). However, E.Q. can be raised. Your son may need to improve a number of social skills. Ask yourself (and him!) these questions:

* Does he like his peers, or does he find them to be "beneath" him, immature, or otherwise deficient? People who like people are people-magnets. Their warm and accepting thoughts and feelings are communicated loudly and clearly to everyone around. Since everyone enjoys being swaddled in the warm embrace of positive regard, they enjoy being around people-lovers. If your son feels disdain or any other rejecting attitude toward his peers, give him some books about Jewish sages like the Baal Shem Tov, who sincerely and deeply loved every simple Jew. In the Baal Shem Tov's generation, intellectual genius was highly regarded and those who were illiterate, uneducated or unable to learn were held in very low esteem. The Baal Shem Tov made every person aware of his or her greatness as a child of G‑d, and, because of his loving attitude, became the beloved leader of the masses.
* Is he on the same page as his peers, or is he on a different plane? People spend time with others with whom they have things in common. Are his classmates into sports, certain books, games or other pastimes? If he can join them on the playing field, he becomes a "team player"—one of the guys. Otherwise, he's out in left field alone. It may be worth it to hire a "sports tutor" or whatever is needed in order for your son to be able to join the party. Similarly, he should study how his peers are dressing and grooming themselves and do the same (whether or not he likes the prevalent style). He should be sure to be clean and fresh as far as his appearance goes. Kids who are unkempt or look different are often shunned.
* Does your son know how to join a conversation, joke around, make people feel relaxed? Does he know how to pick up the phone and invite someone over? Let him use his brains to study the behavior of his peers. The popular business coach Tony Robbins was an overweight, unaccomplished, lonely man who wanted more in his life. He started to study – really study – the behavior of successful people. When he wanted to know what enabled someone to have friends, he would carefully analyze the behavior of popular people. He wanted to know how they stood, how they spoke, what they said, what they did. He would then copy what he saw and he discovered it worked just as well for him as it worked for these other people. Your son can use his advanced brain to make a scientific study of the behavior of the kids around him to see how they interact with each other and how they build and maintain friendships. He can then apply what he learns to his own behavior.
* Is your son likeable? Much has been written in the business world about "people skills." Being likeable is an important key to success in the world—in fact, it is a more powerful determinant of success than being smart. You might be able to find some appropriate reading materials in the self-help business section of your library or bookstore.
* Is your son willing to learn? There are social skills board games. These have been designed by professionals to help young people break down the skills they will need in order to be able to make a few good friends.
* Is your son willing to try everything? A mental health professional specializing in child and adolescent psychology might be able to provide assessment and counseling that can help your son build practical skills and emotional resilience.

Although it may turn out that your son never becomes super popular, by taking advantage of some of the strategies above, he should be able to make a friend or two. This can make an important positive difference to his life.
http://www.chabad.org/blogs/blog_cdo/aid/836582/jewish/My-Child-Has-No-Friends.htm


At 16 years of age most boys and girls are getting very interested in those of the opposite sex. Perhaps the work is less challenging to them. And perhaps they are having trouble establishing personal relationships on a friend level and trouble meeting girls.

More than anything I would think that they need to understand that doing the work even when it seems boring is important in establishing and maintaining good relationships.
 Twilightslove
Joined: 12/9/2008
Msg: 244
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Very High IQ
Posted: 11/7/2010 2:33:52 PM

Many a "popular" kid has gone on to working at Palmer's Feed Store.


So you've been to San Angelo Krebby?

Truthfully I have a family full of high IQ individuals who are having trouble with socializing and while I have the ability to socialize fairly well I do not always show that. Sorely, that has made my family members less capable of making friends. I was looking for articles and websites that might help them develop those skills a bit more without trying to teach them directly. The problem with our lot is that you cannot tell anyone anything or you are trying to be critical. As I've matured and aged I don't take things as critically as I use to and the social skills came a little easier for me as my father had to be extremely social able since he owned his own business.

It is hard watching loved ones go through the aches and pains of growing without wanting to help out. My father use to send me articles in the mail of things he thought I would appreciate learning. Now with computers I do the same with emails.
 Jan Sobieski
Joined: 7/4/2008
Msg: 245
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Very High IQ
Posted: 11/8/2010 5:17:57 AM
If we speak of someones 'emotional intelligence', are we not in danger of simply conflating the term 'intelligence' with 'talent'?



...........................................................................................................
 hungry_joe
Joined: 6/24/2006
Msg: 246
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Very High IQ
Posted: 11/8/2010 5:18:34 PM
EI is great if your using a particular skill like sales, marketing, or anything else where you're dealing with people.

IQ Intelligence Quotiant, well that means how well you learn things, (esp. if your a French school child).

The truely successful melt the two together. Think of a high powered business man the uses his skills to build a product, then sell it. Ahem, still building residental wind turbines in the backyard. :)
 hungry_joe
Joined: 6/24/2006
Msg: 247
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Posted: 11/9/2010 2:55:37 PM
Ah Krebb it is all a matter of circumstance. I am sure the same deep thinking Professor is also quiet social at the faculity parties. Who knows he could even have the Beiver Fear and jammin to him on his i-pod into work.
 nated012
Joined: 10/29/2010
Msg: 248
Very High IQ
Posted: 11/12/2010 5:33:09 AM
"I think that every single psoter on POF forums has an IQ > 150 ."

narcissists taking web based iq test...
I would imagine most people have never had a real IQ test. I have not, don't really care.
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