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Show ALL Forums  > Science/philosophy  > Why aren't there more women involved in math and science?      Home login  
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 lucaspa
Joined: 5/28/2006
Msg: 27
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Why aren't there more women involved in math and science?Page 2 of 10    (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10)
Can't tell you "why", but I can tell you that the situation is rapidly changing. In my generation there were few women. There were no women in my graduate school "class". But now there are far more female grad students in our program (biomedical research) than males. Last year it was 7 females and 1 male. This year it is 5 females and 2 males.

The faculty ratio is about 2 males to 1 female, whereas when I went to graduate school it was 15:1.
 scorpiomover
Joined: 4/19/2007
Msg: 28
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Why aren't there more women involved in math and science?
Posted: 7/5/2009 2:14:52 PM
RE Msg: 35 by novascotialass:
I stand corrected. The media highlights the lack of male role models for kids, but actually what I meant was that the general public doesn't worry that men aren't entering into professions that would be of a benefit to the men themselves. I can't think of one profession that we as a society would try to increase the number of male participants just because it is highly paid. When we do encourage an increase in men's participation, it is for the good of someone else.
I noticed that myself. I think the main reason why, is that we seem the same for all men's rights, that they seem to not be mentioned, unless it is either to state that they should have less, or that it will help someone else if they have more.

I think this is an outgrowth of how feminism has been pushed. Whenever the topic comes out, the main stress always seems to come out about how many women's lives have been made the worse by men, and how women need to be encouraged to redress that "oppressive" balance. The thing is, those calls ignore all the women who liked a heck of a lot of their lives. A lot of women were beaten by their husbands. But a lot were treated very well by their husbands, and many women had the upper hand in their marriages, from the first date to the end of the marriage. That seems to have been ignored.

So men have been blacklisted, been treated like social pariahs, and like the scourge of humanity. So it's no wonder that you have a story about a young man who killed 13 women, because he felt that he was being pushed out of life by women. That's pretty much the feeling of all those men on POF who say they don't want marriage anymore. It's not that they don't want the pleasures of marriage, or that they don't accept the commitments. It's just that things seem so unfairly stacked against men in the divorce courts, that men aren't getting enough of the marriage, to make it worth it. But it's women who want marriage. So women are suffering just as much as men, when society focusses on womens' rights alone, rather than focussing on mens' AND womens' rights.

That's why I decided a long time ago, that I would be a humanist, not a feminist, or a mannist, but someone who believes in the rights of both genders. When the rest of the world catches up with that notion, we might see less animosity of men to women, and more openness to them in the workplace.
 scorpiomover
Joined: 4/19/2007
Msg: 29
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Why aren't there more women involved in math and science?
Posted: 7/5/2009 4:26:34 PM
RE Msg: 39 by novascotialass:
To me, women's rights mean human rights. The only reason it got labelled as women's rights is that we had a lot of catching up to do originally because men had all the advantage in the political and professional world.
I understand that, and agreed with it. But that's not what's happened.

What really changed my mind, was watching an interview with Christine Keeler, the woman in the Profumo scandal back in the 1960s. She said that women got the power, even back then, but they didn't get the emotional maturity to know how to handle it.

That's what I've seen with women today. They've got tremendous power even now. But they aren't being helped to learn how to deal with that power in a mature and responsible fashion. So they aren't.

That's why you see so many teenage girls now getting drunk every night, and getting often into fights, to such an extent, that both the police and nightclub bouncers say that women are an absolute nightmare, and would much rather deal with a drunk and violent man, than a drunk and violent woman.

I would hope that having a bad marriage and divorce doesn't turn men off women completely. Obviously my marriage was not a good one, but I still respect a lot of men. Like a good humanist should, you judge the individual and not generalize the entire gender.
Unfortunately, that's not what most men are seeing. Today, many men are getting into living together, or marriages, very early on, often with the woman having children from a previous relationship. That ends, he gets shafted, and so he gets turned off all types of relationships.

I'm not saying that is happening to all men. But the men I know who are optimistic about relationships, who aren't currently in one already, seem to be either male chauvinists who target women who are vulnerable and easy to manipulate, or men who've dated a lot, but never been in a relationship.

I would caution you to compare the men on POF with a murderer, for obvious reasons.
All the men I've met who don't believe it is OK to hit a woman if she wasn't pushing for a fight, would never hit her even if she was. But I can understand that this type of feeling of oppression is so common amongst men, that SOME men are liable to end up doing such atrocities, merely due to the numbers of men who are already going through this.

Just today, I was watching an episode of Wife Swap. With one couple, the woman did everything to make her man happy. The other, the woman went out to work and paid attention mostly to the kids, not her partner. I was a bit shocked, because the woman who had everything HER way in her life, made changes in the household, and he adapted. She said that she was envious of the other woman, because he was in her eyes, the perfect man. The woman who did everything to please her man, pointed out that the other guy was clearly downtrodden by his partner, and he agreed. He wanted to be a policeman, but because she was going out to work, he was a house husband, and he felt that door was closed to him. Oddly enough, he was the one to get violent.

It seems to me that this was another case of "behind every great man, there's a great woman". A lot of women don't realise just how much of an influence they have over their man. By and large, men take their cues from the women in their life. Not as to their opinions, but as to how they act in general. A weak woman just makes a man feel like his has too much power and not enough discipline. An overbearing woman just makes a man feel like he has too much discipline and not enough control over his own life. But, like it or not, men tend to decide how to act AFTER the woman has showed how she behaves, and not the other way around. At least, that's what I've seen, from wimps to players, and nearly every man in between.

Besides, Marc Lepine, the guy who murdered those engineering students, was abused by his father, which is probably more related to his feelings of inadequacies.
About 15% of men are sexually abused. Add in the numbers who are physically abused, and you've got huge numbers of men with similar feelings of inadequacies. Unfortunately, their issues are not too often addressed. I once asked about centres for domestic violence for men. I was informed that there are a number of centres for domestic violence for women, but none for men, and none who would even treat some men. So I suspect that this incident is the tip of the iceberg, of how much this could kick off. It's not quite a timebomb. But it could be.

I'm just saying that it's time that men's rights need to be addressed as well as women's, or we're going to end up with a society that is just as unhealthy as when men were dominant.
 GeneralizingNow
Joined: 10/10/2007
Msg: 30
Why aren't there more women involved in math and science?
Posted: 7/5/2009 4:31:54 PM

I once asked about centres for domestic violence for men. I was informed that there are a number of centres for domestic violence for women, but none for men, and none who would even treat some men.

Out of curiosity, I looked up "domestic violence centers" online and looked at several of them--*all* help both men and women. So I call BS on your source whom you asked-- once.

So now this has become a discussion of how men are getting the short end of the stick in Western culture? ARGH
 hereshecomesagain
Joined: 3/20/2008
Msg: 31
Why aren't there more women involved in math and science?
Posted: 7/5/2009 9:53:44 PM
I'm going to PMS all over you guys here.

In a family of scientists, I was urged to seek science as a career path. Yet show me one degreed female family member who was able to get even an entry level job in their chosen field? Most ended up in social work which was what I was already doing at the time.

There have been numerous studies on this, and I'll tell you guys to google it, but saying girls nuture and men hunt makes no diff. Saying girls want friendly and sociable careers and more men are content with the anti-social and independent jobs is true. Science careers aren't friendly. Saying girls want to apply their intuition to their work day and men want to apply their brute force of body or logic is also true. Science doesn't like intuition.

I was crazy good at math. What needed many steps to complete I could figure in few. Teachers would SCREAM at me for it. I could never learn the process and did things backwards. It was unimportant that my incorrect processes were accurate. I never ever learned simple column addition subtraction right. What is 392 plus 457? I'd instantly add 40 and 45 without thinking. 850 minus 1 and I was done. I had one math teacher who loved the way I worked, the rest punished me for it. Chemistry was as easy as cooking to me. I was a natural cook. I'd change formulas with a little tweak here and there because I knew that room temperature and humidity and age of the product affected the outcome. No, that's bad, better to get a failed result by following the instructions to the letter. I was even better in life science. I showed how the experiments with peroxide in the petri dish weren't because it was useless, but because we weren't using the right strength. You'd have thought that I had vandalised the lab. Astronomy and meterology were great, but the boys in the class kept saying that, because I was pretty, I could be a weather girl. I was tested at college level in all subjects since fifth grade, and the best aspirations people had for me was weathergirl.
 Ahoytheredave
Joined: 8/29/2006
Msg: 32
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Why aren't there more women involved in math and science?
Posted: 7/6/2009 6:53:55 AM
According to the IEEE, the trend in women entering electrical engineering has reversed and is going back down. I would say the women who chose not to enter technical careers will have to respond but I doubt they would be in this forum. As noted on the POF web site, science and technology are some of the least desired topics for women.

When I went to college, the technical areas had very few women. Of the few there, virtually all received financial help to be there simply because they were women. Almost no men received financial help. There were virtually no minorities even though there was a virtual financial free ride for them. Despite a long array of awards etc. in school and having a single mother, all my scholarships combined could barely cover the first semester books. That is the privilege of being a white male. Over the years, electrical engineering changed and many more women entered the field but in more recent years, the percentage has dropped significantly. When I was in school, it was pretty common knowledge that many of the women in the engineering schools were actually after their Mrs degree, not a profession. In my career, I have interviewed many engineers applying for work. Very few were women.

I freely admit I have been biased and pushed for hiring every woman I ever interviewed but was actually successful in getting only one hired. In nerd quotient, she topped everyone in the department. Some women lab assistants came to me complaining about her total lack of fashion sense as if I were either knowledgeable myself or would even try to respond to their complaints. One woman I pushed for had been a cheerleader in college but a liberal physicist blocked an offer based on technical questioning. A week later, I saw her written answers and found she was absolutely correct and he was wrong. Several of us were ready to string him up and it was decided, all technical questioning would be left to me.

Explanations for the lack of women in engineering could be the wiring differences, and the lack of preparation, as well as social and family pressures. Being as I have seen financial bias in favor of women in engineering my entire working life, I doubt that argument any merit.
 mirage223
Joined: 5/28/2007
Msg: 33
Why aren't there more women involved in math and science?
Posted: 7/6/2009 8:03:13 AM
This has been going on for a very long time...I think it is learned. If you are interested in something, then you like it. My mother just pressured the hell out of me to excel in all areas in school. I was good in math, and I always excelled in English. Science I learned to like later after I started studying it.
Young ladies need to learn to study. I was pushed to excel so I learned early in life that studying is so very important. Also, they do not study the books like I did. I was reading all the time....almost daily and relating a lot of reference to my studies. My mother was highly educated so I was eccentric or considered a nerd up until at least 2005. Of course, I was so smart that I had to do everyone's work for them because they did not understand...sometimes it is not so good to be so PROGESSIVE and sometimes it is grand! In effect, I have a hard time with relationships with men because I can outpreform most of them! So I have to not show my smarts so often so I don't make them mad!
 hereshecomesagain
Joined: 3/20/2008
Msg: 34
Why aren't there more women involved in math and science?
Posted: 7/6/2009 8:25:54 AM
One thing that might skew the stats is that women start and run more micro and small businesses than men and many of these businesses are based upon inventions, improvements, processes and designs engineered by the female entrepreneurs. Also, most at home writers tend to be women, and the part-time freelance writer knows the bread and butter money is in technical ghost writing for science oriented companies. I've made a dollar or two myself that way.

As far as science not being an interest of women on POF, the bottom line is that dating is their number one interest, but it's not here at all. Three quarters of my bookmarks on my smartphone are science sites which I read from everyday, but I don't think I listed it as an interest on my profile (guess I should go look, LOL), note that good cooking requires a chemistry aptitude and no small amount of knowledge and women who sew from scratch, make their own patterns, have engineering knowledge for materials- trust me, it's complicated - when you change a fabric type or thread or even stitch, many other adjustments must be made. I used to make my own bras and pants because manufacturers just didn't get that pressure on the breast causes "bra bulge" and that the crotch gets camel toe with a classic "C" curve but none with an "L". China has the first ever bra engineering degree program at one of their international universities. I hope to go, someday. But my point is that home economics is very much a science in and of itself that many women enjoy and practice daily - and have for a long time. It's a shame it isn't taught anymore. It's not like this knowledge comes automatic. to women.

Finally, open up an standard women's non fashion focussed magazine and you will find science related articles from garden answers to cooking to health and more. Now I know someone's going to say these aren't serious sciences. Whatever. I know a geologist, surveyist, mathemetician, molecular biologist and a physicist along with a lot of engineers who are all helpless at home.
 abelian
Joined: 1/12/2008
Msg: 35
Why aren't there more women involved in math and science?
Posted: 7/6/2009 9:50:05 AM

It's not like this knowledge comes automatic. to women.

That wasn't the question. Science refers to a specific set of disciplines. Home economics, cooking, bra making and engineering in general, are not among them. That would be a different thread.
 GeneralizingNow
Joined: 10/10/2007
Msg: 36
Why aren't there more women involved in math and science?
Posted: 7/6/2009 12:03:41 PM

Message 6, psychology is most definitely NOT a hard science.

I know you think that--my question to you is WHY do YOU consider "soft" science less "important" than "hard" science? Or less difficult? Or less anything? Why point out that there is a difference between "soft" and "hard", other than to infer YOUR feeling that "hard" is superior?

The original question wasn't about "hard" versus "soft" sciences, anyway--the question was "science and math", and my original (and now twice repeated) contention stands: women are well-represented in "science and math", just not in the "science and math" that you think is "important".
 hereshecomesagain
Joined: 3/20/2008
Msg: 37
Why aren't there more women involved in math and science?
Posted: 7/6/2009 1:49:52 PM

That wasn't the question. Science refers to a specific set of disciplines. Home economics, cooking, bra making and engineering in general, are not among them. That would be a different thread.


OK, so, good example, you have a man's question, women's answers, and men aren't liking the answers- The question, as I understood it, asked why more women aren't making a living in math and science fields.

Just as one can diddle and dabble in any field, one can get very serious in home economics and most certainly in engineering, requiring as many years' knowledge or experience as any field in hard science. Because the results are more forgiving these are "soft" sciences. I am speaking of intuitive sciences (which psychology is one) that are more attractive to the generally (scientifically proven) intuitive gender.

Engineering- I don't see why that is not a math/science field? Bra making, no, but bra design, yes. As a clothing designer, I used math, geometry, and factored in the percentage give of a particular fabric on the bias to shape it into clothing, particularly for high end formals. Because changing a size to fit the human body doesn't mean making the pattern larger or smaller, it means re-engineering to get the same look with a different shape. I didn't use more than algebra level math for this, but the question didn't specify "levels" or "hard" or "soft".

My point was to show that many women use math, (not just simple) and sciences in their hobbies and work/business, and they continue to contribute to the science world. Their education serves them well, whether they sought a degree in science, blended the education with other "phiolosphies", or have been largely self educated. They simply found careers which suited them and their lives better than those that are literally designed around men. She can beat herself up to become a geologist or molecular biologist (as my mother and sister did) only to find the fields require that a woman keep on fighting. That's tiring.
 1Lovely64
Joined: 6/29/2009
Msg: 38
Why aren't there more women involved in math and science?
Posted: 7/6/2009 5:47:21 PM
I can't speak for other women, but I SUCK at math and science! LOL

Any English majors out there? Now, we can talk!
 lucaspa
Joined: 5/28/2006
Msg: 39
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History
Why aren't there more women involved in math and science?
Posted: 7/6/2009 7:58:11 PM
hereshecomesagain: "Saying girls want to apply their intuition to their work day and men want to apply their brute force of body or logic is also true. Science doesn't like intuition."

Science loves intuition. Theory formation is a creative process. Theories are NOT digests of data or logic. They are imaginative leaps that are put forward, THEN tested.

All the female graduate students we've put out in the last 10 years have all gotten jobs in their field.

"Chemistry was as easy as cooking to me. I was a natural cook. I'd change formulas with a little tweak here and there because I knew that room temperature and humidity and age of the product affected the outcome. No, that's bad, better to get a failed result by following the instructions to the letter."

You had some REALLY BAD science teachers. I take it this was in high school or college? At the graduate school level, any mentor would have loved to have you in his/her lab.

However, it is important to document the changes to the protocol. Remember, the protocol is a means of testing a hypothesis, not a means to get the "right" answer. Science works by falsifying and, if the protocol is correct but you get a "failed result", what you have done is FALSIFY the hypothesis you are testing. That's what science does. By your brief description, it sounds like you were considering what are called "confounding variables" or "underlying hypotheses" -- that temperature and humidity are going to affect the outcome.
 abelian
Joined: 1/12/2008
Msg: 40
Why aren't there more women involved in math and science?
Posted: 7/6/2009 8:58:04 PM
Engineering- I don't see why that is not a math/science field?

Because engineering is not one of those fields. The sciences are math, physics and chemistry.


My point was to show that many women use math

First of all, what you are calling math is what I would call arithmetic. Second, that isn't even relevant, since using math is not the same as doing work in the field of mathematics.


I am speaking of intuitive sciences (which psychology is one) that are more attractive to the generally (scientifically proven) intuitive gender.

That's crap. If you had ever done any math or physics, you'd realize that a great deal of intuition is required. The difference is that in a hard science, you have to back up your intuition rigorously.
 rhodax
Joined: 6/11/2009
Msg: 41
Why aren't there more women involved in math and science?
Posted: 7/7/2009 12:52:19 PM
I'm with the nurture vs nature crowd. I think how a woman is brought up has a big influence on her interests later in life. Same is true for men of course.
 mirage223
Joined: 5/28/2007
Msg: 42
Why aren't there more women involved in math and science?
Posted: 7/7/2009 1:59:22 PM
think you only have to look at the history of education for women to find the answer.

Bearing in mind that up until less than 100 years ago, the majority of women were denied a formal education and totally discouraged from thinking for themselves, it's more likely to be a case of nurture rather than nature.

The changes that have taken place in the education of women are simply taking time to filter down through the generations.


I totally agree with this statement above....We have come a long way baby!
 GeneralizingNow
Joined: 10/10/2007
Msg: 43
Why aren't there more women involved in math and science?
Posted: 7/7/2009 3:24:19 PM


Psychology consists of theories invented by man. It is not founded upon any scientific laws or for that matter evidence based. It is plainly useful to some, i.e. psycho-therapy and suchlike, but how useful is purely a matter for subjective debate.

All "theories" are invented by man. And isn't that what this is, a subjective debate? I'm unclear what your point is.

So far, I have seen two men define "science" by a subjective standard. And that goes back to my original post, which was that it's a PR thing. Women who are scientists are seen as 'not scientists' by people who don't think what they do is science. Whatever! it's political, PR, however you'd like to say it. OP didn't define "science and math", so who are you to impart YOUR idea of it onto me, and then tell me I'm wrong, based n YOUR definition?
 rhodax
Joined: 6/11/2009
Msg: 44
Why aren't there more women involved in math and science?
Posted: 7/8/2009 2:03:51 AM
While it's not math or science, I did have the opportunity to train several women in mechanical maintenance while in the Navy. This was in the 1980s before women were allowed to serve on regular force ships so they were all reservists. I found that every one of them were quick studies, receptive to the training, and very diligent in carrying out their duties regardless of the amount of grease and diesel fuel involved. At the same time there wasn't a single one that was "manly" in any way.

The men I trained weren't usually as easy to train nor as diligent in their duties as the women. All were quite adequate to the task but I think I'd rather have an engine room full of females when the missiles start flying. I left the Navy just before women went on active duty on ships so I didn't get to see first hand how well this worked.

About three years after I left the Navy my first ship, the Provider, docked in Vancouver at Canada place. I went down with some friends from work to have a look and sure enough some of my old wingers were still aboard. We went down to Station 8 (junior ranks bar) for some drinks and I met a lady named Sue, a Leading Seaman, who was doing the exact same job that I had before being posted ashore. We talked for a couple hours about how the ship was doing and nothing had really changed. It seemed almost surreal talking to this woman as a peer in a job that had only been done by men when I was on the ship. She sure knew her stuff though and showed me up on the systems knowledge front!

She was pretty hot and women in uniform are pretty yummy but I knew from experience to never get involved with a Sailor, they'll break your heart every time.
 abelian
Joined: 1/12/2008
Msg: 45
Why aren't there more women involved in math and science?
Posted: 7/8/2009 7:12:06 AM

So far, I have seen two men define "science" by a subjective standard.

That problem is easily remedied. If you rank the disciplines according to the widely agreed upon classification of hard and soft sciences you get things like sociology at one end of the specrtrum and math and physics at the other end. There is then no question that as you move from the soft to hard sciences, that the number of women gradually decreases to almost non-existent.
 hyoid
Joined: 5/12/2009
Msg: 46
Why aren't there more women involved in math and science?
Posted: 7/8/2009 11:47:07 AM
I think what renders a science soft is the lack of true experimental data. Questions that have endured for decades, like "nature vs nurture" could be resolved in short order with a few simple experiments. However, humane concerns preclude running destructive experiments on humans.
The degree of human interaction required of the discipline may be a large factor in the differences in the number of women in the hard sciences. The "soft" sciences like psychology and sociology have as their subject humans and /or their institutions.

The "hard " sciences usually require sometimes lengthy periods of individual, isolated effort. Men seem to be better able to tolerate this isolation. The much higher incidence of autism and similar disorders among men, with the related obsessive behaviors, points to a greater capacity to be productive under those circumstances.
 LeCutter
Joined: 2/25/2009
Msg: 47
Why aren't there more women involved in math and science?
Posted: 7/9/2009 12:27:18 AM
Maybe because they're in the bedroom and kitchen where they belong?

Hiiiiiii-oooo! :)
 luckygreentiger
Joined: 1/5/2009
Msg: 48
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History
Why aren't there more women involved in math and science?
Posted: 7/9/2009 1:26:02 AM
well, first i have to say that women definitely hold their own in science, math, etc ...
however, i feel that honestly, most women are simply not interested in those fields.
when i was in college, studies have shown that men and women are generally "hardwired" to have certain interests (cf. the gender role studies back in the 60's where they tried to get boys to play with barbies and girls to play with construction toys and other role reversal situations). obviously this is not true for everyone, but i pretty much agree with the idea that it's just more or less who we are. men seem to be drawn to fields like construction and engineering (and related fields). it's not good, it's not bad--it just "is".
this kind of relates to another study that was recently done where they concluded (i don't know how correctly, however), that divorce rates are higher in families with "house husbands" where the women work. the conclusion speculated the rate was higher because the wives don't respect the husbands due to stepping outside their expected roles.

as an unrelated side note (due to reading posts before mine): AP chem in HS sucked -- it was way too hard for me (molecular decomposition kicked my ass and we started that in the first week--not even the "welcome to chem, this is the periodic table"); but the "normal" chem class was way too dumbed down (where all we did was "this is our particular element for today, and here is today's practical--be amazed at the sparks")--i wish i could have started AP chem again after the first couple of months of "regular" chem.
 scorpiomover
Joined: 4/19/2007
Msg: 49
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History
Why aren't there more women involved in math and science?
Posted: 7/9/2009 4:48:22 AM
RE Msg: 41 by CassaGo:

I once asked about centres for domestic violence for men. I was informed that there are a number of centres for domestic violence for women, but none for men, and none who would even treat some men.
Out of curiosity, I looked up "domestic violence centers" online and looked at several of them--*all* help both men and women. So I call BS on your source whom you asked-- once.
I asked someone who works with the homeless, and as many homeless women are victims of domestic violence, he and his colleagues referred many women to such centres. Neither did I just ask him about this ONCE. I asked him to look into it. He came back a few days later. He told me that he'd checked for any centres for men, in my city, and found none, and checked for any centres for men and women in my city, and found none as well. He rang up several centres for women, and asked if they would treat men, or make any allowances for this. They all said no.

So now this has become a discussion of how men are getting the short end of the stick in Western culture? ARGH
How men are treated in Western culture, is a reflection of how women are treated in Western culture, and this affects the way women are treated in Western culture in things not normally considered by feminism, such as whether or not women WANT to work in maths and science.

RE Msg: 70 by novascotialass:
Seems the number of women in science has been increasing and is almost the same as men, at least at enrollment.
That's been true for a long time. But that only changed when the educational system changed to one that favoured women. Women could easily be just as capable as men, and it's always been my belief that this was the case. But women only started doing better in schools in the UK, once the qualifications system was changed to one that women already did better in than men.

I noticed that a study was done years ago, that women were interviewed if they had a top job, and if so, why not, and the majority were saying that they didn't want a top job, because it would make it difficult to take time off to have a family. Women put their careers second to dating and children.

I suspect that like in schools, women will only start going more into maths and science as careers, once the work environment in professional maths and science has been changed to one that women like. If schools are anything to go by, then when that happens, you can expect that men will become an unequal minority.

That would not be gender equality. That would be gender inequality.
 ShortBlonde1985
Joined: 5/10/2009
Msg: 50
Why aren't there more women involved in math and science?
Posted: 7/9/2009 7:23:31 AM
Because its damn boring
 abelian
Joined: 1/12/2008
Msg: 51
Why aren't there more women involved in math and science?
Posted: 7/9/2009 8:27:39 AM

I think you're right that women still carry the heavier burden in child rearing when compared with men, resulting in women turning down promotions.

This isn't really true for academic careers which make up the bulk of scientific careers (at least in the hard sciences). Academic careers allow for a great deal of flexibility. There are few jobs which allow that much independence.
Show ALL Forums  > Science/philosophy  > Why aren't there more women involved in math and science?