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 designingwoman
Joined: 9/4/2005
Msg: 147
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legalized marijuana...a possible American reality?Page 6 of 8    (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8)
Medical marijuana should be legalized in all 50 states to alleviate the suffering of those who need it. Sometimes it's the only thing that helps a cancer patient get through chemo, for example.

As for driving under the influence of marijuana that should remain illegal even if pot becomes legalized. It only makes sense. Alcohol is legal, but it's illegal to drive drunk.

If someone wants to get stoned or drunk at home that's their business. But doing out in public, or driving like that is not good! One of my pet peeves is drunks who puke all over. At least with pot people don't puke all over as a result. I"d rather visit a friend who smokes medical marijuana or even enjoys a joint on occasion as opposed to someone who will get drunk, act stupid and puke.
 verygreeneyez
Joined: 3/15/2006
Msg: 148
legalized marijuana...a possible American reality?
Posted: 1/31/2010 2:27:19 PM
Fourteen states have enacted laws that legalized medical marijuana:
Alaska, California, Hawaii, Maine, Michigan, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington.

Two states have passed laws that, although favorable towards medical marijuana,
did not legalize its use:
Arizona, Maryland

Colorada has a very lax law and allows growing permits to those who are deemed in need medicinal need. 6 plants per permit, up to two permits per patient with an MDs recommendation. (There are similar laws on the books in a number of other states.

Whether federally legal or not, state laws supersede federal statutes. Well, until the Feds get involved for whatever reason.
 imalwayssmiling
Joined: 7/17/2009
Msg: 149
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legalized marijuana...a possible American reality?
Posted: 6/26/2011 11:36:46 AM

I think it's a much smaller deal than all the stoners make it out to be. Most cops won't bust you for a joint or two anyways, and any more wouldn't be legal for "personal use" even under the new laws.
it is a huge deal for something statistically safer than caffeine and aspirin,aspirin kills 200 a year,or 2000 oops, marijuana has never killed a single person. Whats at stake,if arrested for a schedule one drug,you are not allowed a government school loan,you are a criminal for life on record,you are not allowed to be a juror,if you are an unlucky one say here in Arizona,people caught with a couple joints have gone to jail for one and a half months,thats simple possession.caught with a pound,well now your 10 year mandatory in many states,for something with medical value,something that replaces pharmaceutical medicines for over 200 illnesses,its shown the remove tumors,its shown to eat the bad cancer cells and leave the good ones,ect. ect. Its criminal to arrest people for pot period.
 matchlight
Joined: 1/31/2009
Msg: 150
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legalized marijuana...a possible American reality?
Posted: 6/26/2011 6:58:20 PM

Whether federally legal or not, state laws supersede federal statutes. Well, until the Feds get involved for whatever reason.


Where there's a direct conflict between a state law and a federal law, the federal law applies. And for whatever reason, the Supreme Court chose to get involved a few years ago in a case involving a disabled California woman who was using the marijuana from six plants a neighbor grew for to make tea, salves, etc. The case is Gonzalez v. Raich.

The Court found marijuana is still a prohibited Schedule I drug under the federal Controlled Substances Act. That means the government doesn't recognize any medical use for it. So, the Court said, whatever state laws may say, and even if the marijuana was grown and used within the state, federal law prohibits it.

(Raich is one of the main cases the government is citing--for reasons which don't involve pot--to defend the individual mandate in Obamacare.)
 Twilightslove
Joined: 12/9/2008
Msg: 151
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legalized marijuana...a possible American reality?
Posted: 6/26/2011 7:50:48 PM
Pharmaceuticals which kill many and/or cause severe side effects supercede marijuana for the plain fact that pharmaceutical companies pay taxes and your local drug dealers do not pay taxes. Truth is, the government wants their money in any and every thing that is done and pharmaceuticals have more pull then illegal drug dealers and distributors.

It's all about the money.

Just what pills are on the market today that actually cure anything anyways? Don't people who get put on medications usually end up on those medications for a lifetime? Very lucrative business indeed. Create a pill with no real curing ability that will only control a disease not cure it and you have lifetime customers. There is no money in cures.

Meanwhile, investors, pharmaceutical companies, doctors, government officials, etc. are cashing in on lifetime guarantees.
 lubdub_lubdub
Joined: 6/21/2011
Msg: 152
legalized marijuana...a possible American reality?
Posted: 6/26/2011 10:01:11 PM

Just what pills are on the market today that actually cure anything anyways?

You mean like a magic pill that if you take it once you are miraculously cured forever and ever?
None.


Don't people who get put on medications usually end up on those medications for a lifetime?

Yes.
It's called managing the problem.
Especially since most problems seem to stem from some genetic predisposition and problem.
Sorry, I don't think there are any pills to completely change your DNA structure while changing absolutely nothing about you.
It's like expecting science to regrow a leg and then blaming wheelchair companies for forcing people into wheelchairs for the rest of the legless persons life. It's all about money, they just want the people without legs to be dependent upon their product.
Kind of like trying to cure hunger. Never seems to go away. Must solely be the fault of greed.
Just greed greed greed.


Create a pill with no real curing ability that will only control a disease not cure it and you have lifetime customers.

You really think there are no million and billionaires with any affliction whatsoever, invested and investing in trying to find a cure out of personal self interest?
That damn Michael J Fox. If he wanted more than just lifelong customers he'd use his movie star money to find a cure and we'd have a cure! And you Lou Gehrig! Greedy!


There is no money in cures.

Sure there is. There's movie rights, book rights. They made a freaking movie about the intermittent windshield wiper guy.
You really think there will be no financial compensation to the guy that is known throughout history to have cured AIDS, or cancer?
Not everyone is after money. Look at politicians. I guess I should amend that to not everyone is after only money. There's power, history, fame, infamy.
 IgorFrankensteen
Joined: 6/29/2009
Msg: 153
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legalized marijuana...a possible American reality?
Posted: 6/27/2011 4:35:07 AM
I think it all comes down to two basic factors:

1. Socio-historical prejudice

2. Money issues.

The prejudice side has always had the upper hand. When dealing with prejudice, no amount of logical reasoning will work to overcome it, because prejudiced people are closely related to paranoids. All attempts to prove they are wrong, instead proves TO them that the person speaking is part of the plot they fear.

Also, the negative attitude toward all so-called recreational drugs has become linked to CLASS prejudices, RACIAL prejudices, and POLITICAL prejudices, and particularly the first two of those groups, depend upon a refusal to admit they even exist. As most victims of racial or sexual prejudice know well, when someone wants to hold you down, and keeps harping on obviously false declarations about your goals, it's because they REALLY want to return to the "good old days" when they could simply call you a pejorative name and win.

Alcohol and caffeine got past those limits long ago, and are a part of our heritage now, so using them as logical levers to ADD marijuana is a waste of time. It's not ABOUT logic, it's about prejudice.

On the other side of all this IS the money issue. I disagree with the more negative view that says that drug companies and other powerful interests DON'T want to cure problems. That has consistently been proven false throughout our history. I suspect the only reason anyone believes it, is due to a quirk of modern capitalism: we all grew up with ADVERTISING and PROPAGANDA being spouted at us, telling us how far advanced we are, and that cures for everything are just over the next hill, and how we should love our wonderful drug companies and scientists.
The accidental message there, is that cures are EASY TO COME BY. The subconscious deduction from that falsehood is, that therefore the drug companies must be purposely WITHHOLDING cures they already have, in order to milk us. This is helped along by the consistent mis-marketing of partial cures and symptomatic relief, with its exaggerated descriptions of carefree life for everyone afflicted.

Anyway, the only chance for recreational drugs to be legalized, WILL come from the economic side. NOT just the opportunity to make money selling "Rolled Gold" or what ever, but from the reduction in police expenses, and from the increase in tax revenues that might result. We have a ways to go before the monetary concerns outweigh the prejudice.
 FrankNStein902
Joined: 12/26/2009
Msg: 155
legalized marijuana...a possible American reality?
Posted: 6/27/2011 1:44:28 PM

It would require way too much work and cause way too much conflict for the minimal payoff.

I think the reduction of some 15+ billion dollars a year would be a pretty big dent.

Considering that some politicians think that a few million to a public radio / tv and another couple million to planed parenthood is bankrupting America.

Drug War Clock
http://www.drugsense.org/cms/wodclock





Plus, the people who are really invested in "the cause" are very ineffective with the politics of it all.

Their ineffectiveness is purely measured by the size of their pockets.

There are many people that profit from illegal drugs and I am not talking about the dealers or distributors.

Privatized prison systems with big lobby groups. Their goal, to keep those cells full.

You take away marijuana and they lose out big time. Law enforcement, DEA, they all lose.

Because that 15+ billion dollars is spent somewhere and those people are using that money to make sure it stays that way.


The US has ~5% of the worlds population and ~25% prison population.

Making things illegal is big business in the US and now Canada.
 DameWrite
Joined: 2/27/2010
Msg: 156
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legalized marijuana...a possible American reality?
Posted: 6/27/2011 5:08:31 PM
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^you got it!^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
 imalwayssmiling
Joined: 7/17/2009
Msg: 158
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legalized marijuana...a possible American reality?
Posted: 6/27/2011 7:18:59 PM
message 165,spot on,told friends that many times,you cut out the war and you cut out a certain portion of military aid to Colombia and Mexico and other places we probably never heard of,Apache helicopter orders are reduced,private prison lose people,specialized police teams all over the country reduce their ranks,uniform makers,flak jacket makers,rifle makers all lose business,it all goes down the road like the cotton gin .Lot of it is not lost,their is a need of equipment for controlling the manufacturer of actually poisons like meth,explosive house leveling drug making meth operations so all jobs are not lost.Meth users should go to rehab not jail,well ,that's a whole different complex debate

I remember in Portland when the jail centers would fill up so they went in and sent home the petty robbers,car thieves and all lower level criminal,the real criminal in this country.Had so many beds not been filled up with personal use people then we wouldn't have dumped genuine criminals on the street.

Hard to imagine a dad and a mom going to prison for something so petty and their kids going to foster care,the life long problems that causes,then daddy and mommy getting out and now suffering hiring practices that don't hire ex cons,creating economic havoc on those people from then on.Somehow this drug was supposed to be so bad it was worse than what I just described and worth it to warehouse this citizens.I'm tired of people going well then don't do it.....thats a stupid thing to say,how about instead,then remove the law on it.

The fix that would change many things in a drastic way overnight would be the president just taking the herb out of the schedule one category.Then you are no longer a criminal,that's a good start on the road of "baby steps"

The feds say whats the big deal Marinol is what works so why decriminalize marijuana,well since marinol came out many have had bad side effects,some very extreme and real pot,well it has never killed a single person,what side effects,is getting too good a nights sleep a side effect.

What if root beer was illegal,would we here thousands of stories from our neighbors and friends talking how wonderful root beer actually is and say root beer never killed anyone ,yet cigs and alcoholic have killed millions,and then would the opposed say two wrongs don't make a right,just because cigs and alcohol are killers is that a reason to also decriminalize root beer................................well the argument given for pot sounds just as stupid as what if it was root beer or koolaid or.................

they need to just focus on the one thing Pot,and get rid of the crime attached to the use or possession of it.Prohibition was the big foothold that escalated the mafia and Pot has made the cartels,and with the money they made they now do human trafficking and weapons too. We grew the cartels to what they are today.Cartels do not trade petty things valued at the price of a pack of taxed cigarettes.Billions spent on a war and the trade only grew the cartel,who does the math on this stuff,more money spent fighting equals more money made for cartels.....huh ?????

Abraham Lincoln is quoted as saying he enjoys nothing more than sitting on his porch in the evening with a pipe full of hemp and a tall glass of cider.....Fact

George Washington is quoted as saying "Make the most of the Indian hemp seed and sow it everywhere".........Fact
 matchlight
Joined: 1/31/2009
Msg: 159
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legalized marijuana...a possible American reality?
Posted: 6/27/2011 8:58:18 PM

Abraham Lincoln is quoted as saying he enjoys nothing more than sitting on his porch in the evening with a pipe full of hemp and a tall glass of cider.....Fact


Really? With all those hundreds of thousands of men in the Civil War, it seems odd there's no record of them smoking it. Even if Lincoln had wanted to, he would never have had the time, at least while he was president. He barely had time to get a bite to eat, or take a short walk.
 imalwayssmiling
Joined: 7/17/2009
Msg: 160
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legalized marijuana...a possible American reality?
Posted: 6/27/2011 9:39:00 PM
dang I was wrong ,what he said was "Two of my favorite things are sitting on my front porch smoking a pipe of sweet hemp and playing my Hohner harmonica" sorry for the misquote anyways knock yourselves out watching the utube of 50 famous quotes on Marijuana.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iMyquTQLM5Q&feature=share
 OMG!WTF!
Joined: 12/3/2007
Msg: 161
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legalized marijuana...a possible American reality?
Posted: 6/27/2011 10:21:28 PM

I think the reduction of some 15+ billion dollars a year would be a pretty big dent........You take away marijuana and they lose out big time. Law enforcement, DEA, they all lose. Because that 15+ billion dollars is spent somewhere and those people are using that money to make sure it stays that way


Your point is somewhat correct, but your numbers are wrong. The 15 billion is spent federally on the war on all drugs, not just marijuana. State and federal spending is about 42 billion with about an 8 billion grand total spent on pot. Federal spending on pot is about 3.4 billion, not 15. And not all of that by a long shot is spent on prisons and enforcement. More than half of that total is spent on prevention, research and treatment. Also, there is no mandatory sentence for pot possesion. People still get trotted through court, but given the huge backlog of cases, at least in Canada, I doubt that branch of the legal system is worried about generating business. So there's really about 1.5 billion that funnels into law enforcement and jail administration to deal with stoners. However, for a pot head to wind up in jail he or she likely had other convictions, concurrent charges or aggravating circumstances involved with his/her arrest. They likely would have been in jail anyway. Even if pot were legal, being stoned in public would still be a crime like being loaded in public is now. That 1.5 billion wouldn't magically vanish. You'd still have treatment programs in prisons just like there are alcohol treatment programs now. You'd still get people committing crimes while stoned where being under the influence still incriminates them under a drug charge. So I'm not sure the 1.5 billion is attributable simply to keeping harmless stoners under wraps and I'm really not sure that number would shrink to nothing in a perfectly legalized pot world.
 HalftimeDad
Joined: 5/29/2005
Msg: 162
legalized marijuana...a possible American reality?
Posted: 6/28/2011 7:23:08 AM
Here's a recent speech by Jimmy Carter.

In an extraordinary new initiative announced earlier this month, the Global Commission on Drug Policy has made some courageous and profoundly important recommendations in a report on how to bring more effective control over the illicit drug trade. The commission includes the former presidents or prime ministers of five countries, a former secretary general of the United Nations, human rights leaders, and business and government leaders, including Richard Branson, George P. Shultz and Paul A. Volcker.
The report describes the total failure of the present global antidrug effort, and in particular America’s “war on drugs,” which was declared 40 years ago today. It notes that the global consumption of opiates has increased 34.5 percent, cocaine 27 percent and cannabis 8.5 percent from 1998 to 2008. Its primary recommendations are to substitute treatment for imprisonment for people who use drugs but do no harm to others, and to concentrate more coordinated international effort on combating violent criminal organizations rather than nonviolent, low-level offenders.
These recommendations are compatible with United States drug policy from three decades ago. In a message to Congress in 1977, I said the country should decriminalize the possession of less than an ounce of marijuana, with a full program of treatment for addicts. I also cautioned against filling our prisons with young people who were no threat to society, and summarized by saying: “Penalties against possession of a drug should not be more damaging to an individual than the use of the drug itself.”
These ideas were widely accepted at the time. But in the 1980s President Ronald Reagan and Congress began to shift from balanced drug policies, including the treatment and rehabilitation of addicts, toward futile efforts to control drug imports from foreign countries.
This approach entailed an enormous expenditure of resources and the dependence on police and military forces to reduce the foreign cultivation of marijuana, coca and opium poppy and the production of cocaine and heroin. One result has been a terrible escalation in drug-related violence, corruption and gross violations of human rights in a growing number of Latin American countries.
The commission’s facts and arguments are persuasive. It recommends that governments be encouraged to experiment “with models of legal regulation of drugs ... that are designed to undermine the power of organized crime and safeguard the health and security of their citizens.” For effective examples, they can look to policies that have shown promising results in Europe, Australia and other places.
But they probably won’t turn to the United States for advice. Drug policies here are more punitive and counterproductive than in other democracies, and have brought about anexplosion in prison populations. At the end of 1980, just before I left office, 500,000 people were incarcerated in America; at the end of 2009 the number was nearly 2.3 million. There are 743 people in prison for every 100,000 Americans, a higher portion than in any other country and seven times as great as in Europe. Some 7.2 million people are either in prison or on probation or parole — more than 3 percent of all American adults!
Some of this increase has been caused by mandatory minimum sentencing and “three strikes you’re out” laws. But about three-quarters of new admissions to state prisons are for nonviolent crimes. And the single greatest cause of prison population growth has been the war on drugs, with the number of people incarcerated for nonviolent drug offenses increasing more than twelvefold since 1980.
Not only has this excessive punishment destroyed the lives of millions of young people and their families (disproportionately minorities), but it is wreaking havoc on state and local budgets. Former California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger pointed out that, in 1980, 10 percent of his state’s budget went to higher education and 3 percent to prisons; in 2010, almost 11 percent went to prisons and only 7.5 percent to higher education.
Maybe the increased tax burden on wealthy citizens necessary to pay for the war on drugs will help to bring about a reform of America’s drug policies. At least the recommendations of the Global Commission will give some cover to political leaders who wish to do what is right.
A few years ago I worked side by side for four months with a group of prison inmates, who were learning the building trade, to renovate some public buildings in my hometown of Plains, Ga. They were intelligent and dedicated young men, each preparing for a productive life after the completion of his sentence. More than half of them were in prison for drug-related crimes, and would have been better off in college or trade school.
To help such men remain valuable members of society, and to make drug policies more humane and more effective, the American government should support and enact the reforms laid out by the Global Commission on Drug Policy.

He's like 90 now and still saying the smartest and most common sense things in politics - it's why he was both such a breath of fresh air in 1976 and so threatening.
 matchlight
Joined: 1/31/2009
Msg: 163
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legalized marijuana...a possible American reality?
Posted: 6/28/2011 9:17:58 AM
Oh, yes! Who can doubt, even for a minute, that the man who almost single-handedly brought about that regime of murdering Khomeinist thugs in Iran will go down as one of our greatest presidents? I've always thought his anti-Semitic comments were especially interesting.

If those are really Mr. Carter's views on marijuana, it's the one thing I can pretty much agree with him on. The thing that was really threatening about him was the way he conducted his presidency.
 Aristotle_Amadopolis
Joined: 12/8/2011
Msg: 164
legalized marijuana...a possible American reality?
Posted: 2/4/2012 6:55:15 AM

legalized marijuana...a possible American reality?

It would be if everyone would watch this movie.

The Union: The Business Behind Getting High

BC's illegal marijuana trade industry has evolved into a business giant, dubbed by some involved as 'The Union', Commanding upwards of $7 billion Canadian annually. With up to 85% of 'BC Bud' being exported to the United States, the trade has become an international issue. Follow filmmaker Adam Scorgie as he demystifies the underground market and brings to light how an industry can function while remaining illegal. Through growers, police officers, criminologists, economists, doctors, politicians and pop culture icons, Scorgie examines the cause and effect nature of the business - an industry that may be profiting more by being illegal. Written by Brett Harvey

The Union: The Business Behind Getting High is a movie about the big industry that creates and selling illegal Cannabis.Cannabis is still illegal most parts of the world,despite that cigarettes and Alcohol is taking more life's then Cannabis. Written by Feltherre

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1039647/



There are billions tied to keeping marijuana illegal and none for any good reason other than it allows police and prisons to profit.

Also the fact that Hemp is probably the best cash crop out there with over 5000 uses, one of which ironically was use to print the declaration of independence on.

All because of propaganda from the bigger producer of propaganda in the history of the world, the USA government.
 Forereels
Joined: 5/22/2011
Msg: 165
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legalized marijuana...a possible American reality?
Posted: 2/4/2012 8:04:38 AM

Here's a recent speech by Jimmy Carter.


That was a good read, and one of the few times I have agreed with Jimmy!!
 wvwaterfall
Joined: 1/17/2007
Msg: 166
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legalized marijuana...a possible American reality?
Posted: 2/4/2012 10:16:27 AM

There are billions tied to keeping marijuana illegal and none for any good reason other than it allows police and prisons to profit.

Also the fact that Hemp is probably the best cash crop out there with over 5000 uses, one of which ironically was use to print the declaration of independence on.


Coupla points here:

Yes, there are major financial interests who want to keep marijuana illegal, even if a strong financial case could be made for legalization in terms of both added tax revenue and multiple expense reductions.

The problem is that any politician leading the charge for legalization will be subject to all sorts of well financed resistance. The only way I can see it happening is gradually, through DEA budget reductions and incremental decriminalization.

I also think it's important to split hemp legalization efforts away from the marijuana issue. A hemp plant is quite different from a marijuana plant, much more so today than it used to be, since marijuana strains have evolved to maximize THC concentration, making them short and lush while hemp plants are tall and spindly with so little THC content that anyone smoking hemp wouldn't experience anything more than a headache.

Legalizing hemp production would be a far simpler matter with far less resistance. Here in WV, a very socially conservative state, a bill legalizing hemp production sailed through the legislature several years ago with no real opposition contingent only on federal approval, which would NOT require congressional action - only an executive decision to restore interpretation of the original federal law making marijuana illegal that specifically exempted hemp due to its many industrial uses at the time.

I've long been a proponent of hemp. Canada legalized it with no negative impacts that I'm aware of, and hemp products are already legal in the U.S., even if growing hemp isn't. I use hemp shampoo, have a hemp briefcase and wallet, and buy hemp clothes whenever I can find good quality items, which isn't easy due to the fledgling status of the industry. I keep hemp paper on hand for special uses, which resembles fine stationary.

Oh, and only the early drafts of the Declaration of Independence were written on hemp. The final version was written on parchment. But hemp was certainly in common use for many, many things in this country until the post WWII era.
 Aristotle_Amadopolis
Joined: 12/8/2011
Msg: 167
legalized marijuana...a possible American reality?
Posted: 2/4/2012 10:29:10 AM

The problem is that any politician leading the charge for legalization will be subject to all sorts of well financed resistance. The only way I can see it happening is gradually, through DEA budget reductions and incremental decriminalization.


The film takes a close look at that and the relationship between government and lobbyist.

They also look into the effect of decriminalization and come to the conclusion that it must be made legal and not just decriminalize as doing so does nothing to change the supply and all associated problems that stem from that.



The bottom line is the only problems that come from marijuana are those that are created by the people that make it illegal.
 wvwaterfall
Joined: 1/17/2007
Msg: 168
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legalized marijuana...a possible American reality?
Posted: 2/4/2012 11:21:13 AM

They also look into the effect of decriminalization and come to the conclusion that it must be made legal and not just decriminalize as doing so does nothing to change the supply and all associated problems that stem from that.


Oh I agree that it should be legal. I just think that is unlikely to happen all at once without some political imperative that at the moment I can't imagine. Perhaps if the drug cartel violence escalated to such a degree that the rational argument for legalization was viewed as a way to stop the violence. But more likely we'd just treat it like the 'war on terror' and spend more energy on violent solutions than dealing with the root of the problem. We're much more apt to "go get the bad guys" than take away the reasons for bad behaviors to happen.

In terms of what's politically feasible, this just seems like an issue that needs to be nudged in the right direction rather than changed in one fell swoop. Deal with rising incarceration expenses by tweaking sentencing guidelines to reflect the actual risk to society various crimes present. Change the 'war on drugs' strategy much like we're changing our overall military strategy to make it more streamlined. That sort of thing.

Then once we get used to a lessened emphasis on drug 'crimes', take the final step to legalize marijuana with appropriate constraints.
 Aristotle_Amadopolis
Joined: 12/8/2011
Msg: 169
legalized marijuana...a possible American reality?
Posted: 2/4/2012 11:36:04 AM

...Perhaps if the drug cartel violence escalated to such a degree that the rational argument for legalization was viewed as a way to stop the violence.

...and in there lies the grand irony.

The stiffer laws and penalties the more violent it becomes.

As the risk goes up so does the reward.

The movie interviewed dealers and one thing they are all for, is keeping weed illegal as the harsher the penalties the more they can make.
 matchlight
Joined: 1/31/2009
Msg: 170
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legalized marijuana...a possible American reality?
Posted: 2/4/2012 7:20:03 PM
I don't know if the new Congress will have any strong inclination to amend the Controlled Substances Act. That's the federal law that lists marijuana as a Schedule I substance--meaning it has no officially approved medical use. As long as the CSA remains unchanged, any state law that allows marijuana use will be invalid. I think it should be up to the people of each state to decide, but that's not how it is right now.
 wvwaterfall
Joined: 1/17/2007
Msg: 171
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legalized marijuana...a possible American reality?
Posted: 2/4/2012 9:33:40 PM
I think it should be up to the people of each state to decide, but that's not how it is right now.


I'd support that change. That's one of the ways it might be more politically palatable if it were part of a state's rights agenda.
 matchlight
Joined: 1/31/2009
Msg: 172
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legalized marijuana...a possible American reality?
Posted: 2/5/2012 10:54:20 AM

That's one of the ways it might be more politically palatable if it were part of a state's rights agenda.


A few years ago, when the Supreme Court decided Gonzalez v. Raich, the California medical marijuana case, the Court-watchers wondered if the so-called conservative justices would uphold states' rights, or Congress' power to regulate interstate commerce. Except for Justice Thomas, they went for the latter.
 Aristotle_Amadopolis
Joined: 12/8/2011
Msg: 173
legalized marijuana...a possible American reality?
Posted: 4/7/2012 9:05:46 AM

legalized marijuana...a possible American reality?

That depends on if you are on the Government / Drug dealers side, or on the side of the tax payer.

As Drug Dealers and the Government would like to keep it illegal as it is in their financial best interest.


http://i.imgur.com/xbVPt.jpg
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