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 OMG!WTF!
Joined: 12/3/2007
Msg: 126
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Homeless asking for Money....Page 9 of 11    (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11)

You are completely lost in the "trees." Utterly and totally. Perfect example of not realizing what it is that you don't understand.


Well explain it then. Quit being so cryptic all the time. It sounds like you were suggesting people are homeless because it's too difficult to cash pay checks. What is it exactly you were trying to say? What don't I understand?
 Twilightslove
Joined: 12/9/2008
Msg: 129
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Homeless asking for Money....
Posted: 11/12/2010 7:56:47 AM
Ten Reasons the Homeless have a Hard Time finding a Job
It's not as easy as "just get a job."
A lot of people wonder why the homeless don't just get a job. There are a lot of reasons it is difficult - not impossible - but very difficult. This list doesn't even include things like addictions, extremely low confidence and self esteem.

1. No permanent mailing address
2. No phone for contacting
3. No appropriate clothing
4. No clean clothing
5. No way to shower, shave, and clean up
6. No Identification, drivers license or social security card
7. Just out of prison
8. Mentally ill and should be receiving help
9. No transporation
10. No money for bus fair
http://www.squidoo.com/lovethehomeless#module28531932

It seems so simple to those of us who have a home and jobs to think that they just aren't trying to be productive citizens. I worked in Human Resources. I can assure you that I looked for all these things when I was reviewing application. Appearance was a big deal from the very start, walking through that door to apply for the position. If the applicants first impression was dirty and unkempt the receptionist would inform us of that and the applicant would be at the bottom of the pile from the very start. If they had no way of contacting them (no address, no phone number to call) how was I suppose to contact them? Applicants that cannot be located get placed at the bottom of the pile. HR looks at your record, your job experience, your education, and how well you complete the application. They look to see how you are going to get to and from their job (in other words....what type of transportation do you have?). If a homeless person actually did make it to the interview process and was offered a job they would have to supply the necessary credentials such as their driver's license and social security card and they would have to make it to the interviews. Most homeless would not have met the criteria that I was told to look for when reviewing applications.
 OMG!WTF!
Joined: 12/3/2007
Msg: 137
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Homeless asking for Money....
Posted: 11/12/2010 11:49:40 PM

Do you see our government doing anything or are you just going to give me the Corrections Community Employment Center nonsense again!


CORCAN is the government. Maybe from your reading of the links I provided you when asked, you could suggest one thing that is nonsensical about the services it provides. You said it was impossible for convicts to get jobs. It's actually easier for convicts than people who have no employable experience or skills.


That's an opinion as opposed to fact!
Show me stats, sources other then pulling shit out of your ass and believing it to be fact!


I did show you factual statistics on CORCAN and you said it's nonsense. So just believe whatever you want then. You'll be much happier that way. You'd like statistical proof that giving money to drug addicts is a bad practice? Seems challenging. However, there are several studies done with traceable money that shows how panhandlers spend their change. That's all going to be more nonsense though. So just ask yourself this question first...What do you think a drug addict is going to do with money? People lose fortunes to drugs, millions of dollars, cars, houses and boats. What do you possibly think an addict with no money will do when he/she finally gets money? This isn't hard. It's common sense. You shouldn't do one single thing to help an addict stay addicted one hit longer than necessary. So when you drop them some change or five bucks, you're really doing them and anyone who loves them a great disservice. They will get money some other way until they get caught stealing and get thrown in jail or give up completely and get help. Either way, it's better than continuing to get stoned for free on your dime.


1. No permanent mailing address
2. No phone for contacting
3. No appropriate clothing
4. No clean clothing
5. No way to shower, shave, and clean up
6. No Identification, drivers license or social security card
7. Just out of prison
8. Mentally ill and should be receiving help
9. No transporation
10. No money for bus fair


I agree. It's much easier to be homeless than to create financial stability starting from nothing. Besides number eight and maybe number six on very sparse occasions, the rest are really just excuses that are addressed by social agencies in most major cities. Do you think society hasn't noticed this list? It has. The Calgary Drop In Center has shower fascilities, clothes, laundry, boots for working, provides a mailing address, a phone service that takes messages, email, bus fair for the first two weeks of your new job, bag lunches for your new job, assistance finding a new job, skills training, addiction counseling, mental health services, food, social events, birthday parties (honestly).

I'm not at all trying to suggest all homeless people need to just pull themselves up by their boot straps. I'm not suggesting mental illness and addictions aren't serious problems that go way beyind homelessness. Nor am I suggesting you shouldn't give 'till it hurts if you want to. But you've got to wonder why people don't take advantage of the resources available to them. Is it because they really aren't free? You have to be looking for employment to stay at most funded agencies. You can't be addicted, can't come home late, must get along with others etc. It really is way easier to be homeless. Especially if people give you money.


Common sense is only useful when there is at least a minimal foundation of knowledge to apply it to.

You might want to start by building that base for yourself.


There you go again. Instead of leaving us dummies hanging out in the breeze, cast us a few of your pearls for god's sake. We're starving here. I suspect a list much like the one above is what Sahara is getting at. But the mystery will remain.
 Earthpuppy
Joined: 2/9/2008
Msg: 139
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Homeless asking for Money....
Posted: 11/13/2010 2:02:58 AM
I notice that a lot of the judgement of and condemnation of the homeless amongst us, places the fault primarily on people, instead of the system of wealth inequality. Nearly all of us on here were raised in the generations after the great depression and have known only these decades of brief and fleeting prosperity, thinking it to be normal and sustainable.

The growing numbers of the homeless are indicators of the future for many of us, even the most smug. How long can we export all manufacturing to slave labor sweat shops abroad before it hits close to your own home? At what point does merely printing more money make our hard earned savings worthless? The housing bubble illusion was burst a couple of years ago with tremendous fallout for the building trades, suppliers, manufacturers, and others. The majority of the folks I know in the trades are just barely hanging in there, desperate for work, working for less and feeling a whole lot less secure than they were a couple of years ago.

The fact that 18% of Americans struggled to keep fed at some point last year should serve as a warning that things can get a lot worse before, or if, they get better. The McAmerica that we grew up on is changing rapidly. RoboForclosures, medical bankruptcies, record unemployment and underemployment, outsourced jobs, escalating food prices, lack of affordable housing and the growing wealth inquality trends are going to be pushing untold millions more into homelessness before it gets better. I know a man worth millions a couple of years ago, who, after a bout with cancer while the economy tanked and his insurance company dumped him, is now struggling to stay in his home. It's increasingly common seeing entire families become homeless overnight. Student homelessness is a growing trend. It's not uncommon to have hundreds or thousands show up to apply for a handful of jobs. Soup kitchen lines are growing. And yet, the smug just say..."get a job". With the real unemployment rate hovering between 17-22%, the act of getting a job is difficult enough for those who are still in their homes, over-qualified, and showered.

As Helen noted above...get out and try homelessness on for a week to see what kind of stuff you are made of. At the least, you might develop some semblence of empathy and humanity over the situation of millions. It's also good practice for that highly probable time when your smugness gets slapped down by your own foreclosure/health crisis/pinkslip sorta day.



The richest 1 percent of Americans now take home almost 24 percent of income, up from almost 9 percent in 1976. As Timothy Noah of Slate noted in an excellent series on inequality, the United States now arguably has a more unequal distribution of wealth than traditional banana republics like Nicaragua, Venezuela and Guyana.

C.E.O.’s of the largest American companies earned an average of 42 times as much as the average worker in 1980, but 531 times as much in 2001. Perhaps the most astounding statistic is this: From 1980 to 2005, more than four-fifths of the total increase in American incomes went to the richest 1 percent.
Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/its-official-in-terms-of-income-inequality-america-is-now-a-banana-republic-2010-11#ixzz159cyYkJJ
 Vannili
Joined: 7/8/2008
Msg: 140
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Homeless asking for Money....
Posted: 11/13/2010 5:08:19 AM
get out and try homeless on for a week to see what kind of stuff you are made of. At least, you might develope some semblence of empathy and humanity over the situation of millions.

I don't need to get out and be homeless to feel the empathy for a homeless person .. I gave 10, 20,40 bucks , to a distitute person, Iam not rich but I work 2 jobs and my sewing business. When the economy I was down ,I was out of job,/business.And when my unemployment check was exhausted, I supported myself for 4 months on my savings and my bills is more than thousand a month.. The moral of my story is not to impress others. But to say ,we are responsible of our beings not the other person,nor the goverment/State President... Most homeless are lazy,and greedy,my observation for 6 months working as a volunteer in a facility feeding people , I don't know how the goverment system works,but most of the people I encounter are young and old in disability pension( they look alright to me). They don't want to work, they don't want to give ,I don't mean in monetary ,I mean to lift a hand to help ,when we serve pastry (donation from supermarkets) they devoured like ....... And most poor people only live few days a month when they get their check,they go to casino,eat buffet and gamble until they are broke. then back to square one again. I befriend a poor guy that I always gave a dollar that clean my car windows in a shopping mall,he said he makes 65 bucks good day and he spent $20 a day for methadon a medicine that won't make a person sick.
If he is contented and the other homeless people with their bored life who am I to judge.. I still give a dollar to some pandhandler,it is not the case of money but to let them know that I recognize them as a human being and I am one of them...
But I don't want to be in their position,I would rather bust my Azz,roll with the punches,pay my bills and pay taxes.... it is just me
 OMG!WTF!
Joined: 12/3/2007
Msg: 141
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Homeless asking for Money....
Posted: 11/13/2010 6:34:14 AM
You think it's so easy? Try it. Try it for one week. See how fast you call upon the resources truly homeless people don't have.


There are 92 shelters near the town you've listed as your area of operation. And this doesn't even include the main Boston area. Here's the link...

http://www.homelessshelterdirectory.org/cgi-bin/id/city.cgi?city=Quincy&state=MA

They all offer various degrees of services and I'm sure they're not all applicable to every homeless person. If these services really aren't available to people I'd be very interested in knowing why.


In 2005, 195 individuals were experiencing homelessness at a point in time; of these individuals, 96 persons fit HUD’s definition of chronically homeless


This is from some Quincy MA Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness. There should be enough services to cover these people in your area. No? Why not?

Where I live, the drop in center has to advertise on tv. 1300 beds, full only on the coldest nights in winter.



That woman I interviewed all those years ago was pulling herself up. But nobody would let her do it.


No. YOUR company didn't hire her because you worked with a bunch of racists. And that doesn't even come close tomeaning nobody would hire her. The reason you gave for her not getting the job had nothing to do with the fact that she was homeless. Do you think she's still unemployed? It sounds like she was very interested in getting a job and was doing the right things to get jobs. There were 150 people applying. It would stand to reason that a lot of very well suited people didn't get hired.


It isn't that easy.


What isn't that easy? Pulling yourself up by your boot straps? I agree. That's what I've been saying all along. For some who aren't mentally/physically ill, it's easier to be homeless.
 Twilightslove
Joined: 12/9/2008
Msg: 142
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Homeless asking for Money....
Posted: 11/13/2010 7:44:11 AM

Please Read First

As someone who has worked in homeless shelters I am very aware that the vast majority of homeless shelter workers are good people who are doing their best. I am glad that homeless shelters exist to help people without homes. But it would be an injustice to pretend that homeless shelters in America are plentiful enough, safe enough, or free of downsides.

Shelter Hours Incompatible with Work Hours
Homeless shelters operate on rigid schedules... So do jobs!
photo taken by Yousuf Karsh and uploaded by Skeezix1000

Contrary to popular belief, many homeless people work. Because check in hours for shelters are often rigid and the process of waiting in line and checking in are time consuming, many working homeless people cannot use them. Other homeless people have evening or night work hours which don't allow them to get into a shelter before curfew.

Even if they have a nine to five job, the time a person must begin standing in line to get into a homeless shelter begins before they would get out of work.

Another reason some homeless shelters are incompatible with having a job is that they require the shelter users to attend AA or other drug abuse rehab classes (often held during normal work hours) every day they use the shelter - whether they have a drug or alcohol problem or not.

By the time I had a regular job, I had decided to sleep outside exclusively so this was not a problem for me.

Lack of Handicapped Accommodations in Shelters
Disabilities make shelter use difficult
photo by Craig Toron, SXC

I was shocked and sickened to see a man turned away from a shelter I was in line for due to the fact that he was in a wheelchair. Another person and I offered to pull his chair up the stairs and to help him inside the shelter if he needed it. They gave us a line about insurance concerns and said that they were sorry but, no, he couldn't use the shelter. That was the first time I saw a handicapped person turned away from a shelter but sadly, it was not the last.

Many homeless shelters are in old buildings re-purposed to fit a bunch of beds. Sometimes their beds are located above the first floor and they have no elevators. Some shelters don't have railings in the restrooms or ramps into the rooms or buildings either.

Regardless of what the Americans with Disabilities Act says; many shelters turn away people in wheelchairs or with other mobility limitations such as the need to use a walker or crutches to get around. While sometimes they will offer a hotel voucher to the handicapped person that doesn't always happen.

Danger of Rape or Assault
Exchanging safety for shelter
photo by Sanja Gjenero, SXC

Homeless shelters are often hunting grounds for predators. Some of the craftier ones get jobs at homeless shelters while others just watch for individuals departing the shelters. It's not just rapists, either. Predators in search of "excitement" will track a lone person leaving a shelter so they can beat him or harass him for fun.

Also, though there are usually attendants of some kind on watch almost none of them are trained to deal with violent behavior making homeless shelter users vulnerable to other shelter users who are predators.

For me, this was the number one reason to avoid homeless shelters. Once you get raped or assaulted in a homeless shelter or because you were trailed after leaving one you just don't want to try it again no matter how hot or cold or rainy or whatever it is outside.

Fear of Contracting Disease
Diseases spread easily in homeless shelters
photo by Andrzej Pobiedziński, SXC

One reason it's hard to fall asleep in a homeless shelter is the fact that about a third of the people sharing it with you have a nasty cough. Many of those with chronic coughs have chronic illnesses, transmissible diseases. Tuberculosis is frighteningly common among homeless people. And when you may have to sleep out in the elements on any given night (there's no guarantee you'll get into a shelter every night) even the flu can be a dangerous disease to contract.

Keep in mind that many homeless people are homeless due to ill health and you'll see why homeless shelters full of sick people pose an even greater risk to them.

I honestly hadn't thought about this until I volunteered in a shelter and it was strongly recommended that I get a tuberculosis vaccination and a flu shot.

An Invasive and Disrespectful Check in Process
Surrendering dignity for shelter

This answer has gotten me a lot of flack. Even though it played only a minor part in my decision not to use shelters, I feel it is an important part.

The check in process in some but not all homeless shelters is sometimes humiliating and dehumanizing.

I was asked questions such as "Do you have any sexual partners you could stay with?" as well as other questions about my sex life on more than one occasion. One shelter worker even suggested that I find a boyfriend to stay with - basically she was suggesting I exchange sexual favors for a place to sleep. Keep in mind that I, like many homeless people, had already been the victim of sexual assault. I felt violated.

Why Do People Become Homeless?

featured lens Some Reasons People Become Homeless

Many people feel that homeless people are entirely to blame for their own miserable situation. Those people believe that under no circumstance could they find themselves homeless because they feel they are better than "those people" who hav...

Separation of Family Members in Shelters
Giving up family for shelter

This is a biggie and it's pretty horrible when you think about it. Most homeless shelters separate families.

Women can bring their pre-teen children into most women's shelters but teenage male children (as young as 13) may be required to go to a men's shelter which they may not even get into. Can you imagine a mother leaving her young teenage son to sleep alone on the street without her protection while she sleeps in a shelter? Most don't so the whole family sleeps in their car or outside.

Men and women usually cannot be in the same homeless shelter so husbands and wives are separated, knowing their spouse might not get a bed in a different shelter. These people are often elderly or disabled and depend on each other for safety and care. So again, most of them will forgo the use of homeless shelters so they can take care of each other.

Also, children cannot stay in men's homeless shelters. This leaves homeless single fathers in a very difficult spot. This seems not only heartbreaking but criminal.
http://www.squidoo.com/why_homeless_people_avoid_shelters


The article is a good read on why many homeless decide to live outdoors instead of in shelters.
 OMG!WTF!
Joined: 12/3/2007
Msg: 143
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Homeless asking for Money....
Posted: 11/13/2010 9:11:01 AM
Twillightslove, awesome article. Thanks for giving me something that suggests where the end of the forest is. I still wonder what happens when you get rid of every single excuse imaginable? I've realized that I probably live in a totally unique city and I'm being a bit of a jerk. We have the largest drop in center in the country. It was built in 2002, is purposely nicer than its surrounding buildings, cost way to much at the time and addresses each and every issue your article has raised.

Working hours and intoxicated people....

The drop in emergency beds are open 24 hours a day and serves intoxicated people...


Emergency Beds are accessed on a first come first served basis daily beginning at 5:00p. Clients can be served on the 1st, 2nd or 3rd Floors. The 1st Floor serves men and women who are intoxicated or under the influence. The 2nd Floor serves men who are intoxicated or under the influence. The 3rd Floor serves sober men and women.


There are also no requirements for any kind of treatment. Just show up. Other beds require a 10pm curfew unless you have authorization in the form of a letter from an employer stating your hours. These beds are in groups of two per room, offer storage and are cleaned daily.

Danger of catching a disease....


The Wellness Centre is staffed by a team of health professionals providing health care services 7 days a week from 9:00a-7:00p. Emergency health care services are also available on an as needed basis. The Health Care Team is comprised of 2 Physicians, 2 Registered Nurses and a Medical Office Assistant. The team is supported by allied professionals who provide services on-site on a scheduled basis throughout the week. These include: a specialized Wound Care Nurse, a Chronic Disease Management Nurse, a Diabetic Program Team, a Behavioural Health Consultant, a Psychiatrist, a Chiropractor and Massage Therapist.


Compared to sleeping outside, there's no danger here at all. Short of living in a bubble, it's very safe.

Handicap accessable...

Not an issue. Built in 2002 to all applicable codes.

Danger of being assaulted...

In 2007 after a serious assault on a client the Calgary drop in center installed cameras, hired 24hr security and required finger printing to get in. I haven't found any follow up reports but also haven't heard of any recent problems. It helps that they built a nice building in a decent part of town and have 24 hr security. It's not a place anyone is afraid to walk past. But that could easily be an issue in other places. However, it's a million times better than sleeping alone under a bridge.

Invasive check in procedures....

Yes. People were not happy about the finger printing. Keeps out the criminals for sure. Again, better than sleeping outside with the criminals.

Yet oddly, we still have homeless populations here. Every single issue in the above article has been addressed. People in charge of these agencies know all of these issues by heart and work to mitigate them. So if I'm stuck in the forest and just don't get the real issues, what are the real issues? It's mental illness which is actually addressed at the drop in as well. I'm not invalidating anyone's struggle. But for every reason other than mental illness, there is an identifiable solution. Can it possibly be that people who do not suffer from any mental illness prefer chronic homelessness to the requirements of living self sufficiently? Is that even remotely possible?
 Vannili
Joined: 7/8/2008
Msg: 144
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Homeless asking for Money....
Posted: 11/13/2010 9:48:17 AM
Seriously enough with your amateur armchair psychologist routine.Its gotten boring and your not so clever as you seem to think.


You'll be more effective if you address the issue like an intelligent adult ,instead of verbally insulting another forumite of her opinion..
If you think you are cleverer than her,shouldn't you be wiser not to stoop down to her level then ???
Now , don't insult me of my opinion and throw back at me my punctuation, english and bad grammar, I may not be good on these but I know how to connect with others as a big person that is the most important ....


"and your not as clever as you think"

you mean "you're "not as clever as you think????>>>>>> We are all fallable, we are no better than that other person,you should remember that.
 Lint Spotter
Joined: 8/27/2009
Msg: 145
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Homeless asking for Money....
Posted: 11/13/2010 10:54:53 AM

Seriously enough with your amateur armchair psychologist routine.Its gotten boring and your not so clever as you seem to think.
I disagree... I happen to think that she is quite clever. And this is the opinion of a person that has been told on numerous occassions that I'm no slouch myself...

Dozens of people can't be wrong...
 OMG!WTF!
Joined: 12/3/2007
Msg: 149
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Homeless asking for Money....
Posted: 11/14/2010 10:48:48 PM
The next dollar you hand to a crack head may go to a pack of smokes or a beer which is actually more fatal, but legal!

Ironic isn't !

http://understandinguncertainty.org/node/574


You've misunderstood the study you're referring to. Researchers often give attention grabbing titles to their studies like "Alcohol is More Dangerous than Heroin". But if you don't actually read the study you'll get the wrong idea. The study was done in two parts. First, the impact of twenty different drugs on the individual...how much harm each drug does to you. And the second part was the over all harm on society. Alcohol is so widely used by millions and millions more people than heroin that it has a tremendous, huge, enormous effect on all of society in terms of health care costs, hours of labour lost to alcohol, police resources, etc etc. However, the effect on the individual is much less. For example, you can drink a glass of wine without feeling the need to sell your mama's couch to get another glass. When you look at the study in terms of a graph, alcohol does come out ahead of heroin on the danger scale, but only because of the huge cost to society as a whole. However, short of reading the study, a slight bit of common sense should tell you that heroin, coke, meth, are far more immediately dangerous to the user than alcohol or cigarettes.


The modelling exercise concluded that heroin, crack and methylamphetamine, also known as crystal meth, were the most harmful drugs to individuals, but alcohol, heroin and crack cocaine were the most harmful to society.

When the scores for both types of harm were added together, alcohol emerged as the most harmful drug, followed by heroin and crack.


So there you go.


Most homeless people have lived incredibly painful lives filled with all types of horrors that would have killed many of us. Many of the folks I speak with have a great amount of shame and this shame can be paralyzing when it runs deep in a person. There are so many causes of homelessness and expecting all homeless people to respond in the same manner to the help offered could be why there is still a homeless population in your city or any city for that matter?! Each individual is going to respond differently to any help that is offered, this includes the homeless and those of us fortunate enough to have a roof over our heads.


Wicked point. I knew a girl whose dad killed her mom and locked her in the room the the corpse for a few days when she was very young. She hated being inside and preferred to sleep outdoors. That's a rough one. I just wasn't buying the usual myths that go along with homelessness. There aren't enough resources or programs to help people. Criminal records make it impossible to get jobs. Not having an address makes it impossible to get a job. Alcohol is more dangerous than heroin. You know. Crazy sh't like that.


You people are oblivious!


Sophomoric maybe. But not oblivious.
 daynadaze
Joined: 2/11/2008
Msg: 150
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Homeless asking for Money....
Posted: 11/15/2010 12:15:55 AM
Yes, if I have some cash and it's safe to pull over to hand them money, but if it looks like someone trolling for drug or booze money, then no.
 sweetest
Joined: 10/8/2007
Msg: 151
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Homeless asking for Money....
Posted: 11/15/2010 4:36:28 AM
While I haven't always held my present point-of-view as firmly as I do now, I have always tried to take the individual's side, and to keep my decisions based around what I can do to help that person.

Aside from shelter having a home is our own personal hub for food, communications, hygiene, and is for the most part, what establishes what is generally construed as 'normalcy' in one's day-t0-day life. Without one, it seems everything is in flux and one's ability to do what some here are just thinking can be achieved with motivation and thought alone, often is impossible.

Being able to get a job or land a job despite intent, requires access to a lot of established systems to be in place and those are interdependent, and usually available to us through our address alone. While some can argue that there are resources in every community for those who have no home, when one doesn't have those things readily close by or if those resources are scattered throughout a municipality--accessing them could take an entire day of walking.

In reading this thread, I pick up a sense of smugness around some people's particular 'bootstrap' stories. I know of mental illness, I know of depression...not as a personal story of my own, but certainly as the next best thing to actually having those problems; and know of the toll and difficulty that it takes on one's ability to process and work in the ways that most would see as being a 'productive' member of society.

Among those people who are homeless, many are afflicted not lazy---but of course statistically some are. It may seem that most are because the measure of evaluating worth for some suggests that laziness explains their lack of meaningful employment.

There are lots of people with white collar jobs right now who are no longer productive in their own spheres---but who 'enjoy' their (lazy) days spent at home on a couch because they can't really get up out of bed to do their 'work' bit any longer---not many are witnessing that, so they don't see how similar these circumstances are.

Lucky for them, they don't have to be out in public demonstrating what abject failures they are in their own lives.... They, like with many of the homeless afflicted, the most detrimental and debilitating thing that's going on -- is their own thinking and processing and it's often illness that's the root, not some notion that people largely want to be unproductive. Even if depression or other mental illness wasn't diagnosed initially, living a marginal 'shut out' excluded existence or being homeless, constantly feeling devalued, is hazardous toxic stuff; which over time does manifest in ways that destroys the opportunity to be motivated and therefore regain a place in society.

Even typing that, "regaining a place in society"...suggests that they don't have a place---don't they? It seems if you're without a home, you're not entitled to be ill..and be on the streets. Tons of people in your /our world are allowed to be ill....as long as they are confined to their own home. Take away the home, they're now not just ill but fall into the rank and file of the despicable.

Two very important readings among many from this thread...(for me anyway) include:

I think about what my late-mother used to say, "You never lose when you give". I also think of my late-father, who couldn't pass by a pan-handler without parting with a few bucks and more importantly, a word or two in recognition of his view that, in the absence of truly knowing anther's life circumstance, they are to be accorded the respect borne from basic human dignity.

and especially, this one:

Anytime we see an adult who is homeless, we can think about the child they once were and what might have happened to them. Anytime we see somebody who is pushing a shopping cart and talking to themselves or apparently drunk on the sidewalk, we know they didn't start out that way. They were once every bit as adorable as any other child; there was every bit as much hope in their eyes, every bit as much beauty in them as in our own children. Something happened to them, probably something awful, probably more than once, that broke them and brought them to their sorry state. They were once children who didn't get a fair break. So let's honor who they were. Let's at least give them a fair break now.

Interview between Marc Polonsky and John Records from the Sun Magazine Sept. 2008

 OMG!WTF!
Joined: 12/3/2007
Msg: 154
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Homeless asking for Money....
Posted: 11/15/2010 6:33:04 AM

I haven't misunderstood it at all! Nice try though! ;)

It was suggested that by giving homeless people money we're actually helping kill them.
I also have to see the ignorant call them crackheads, and I call them ignorant because I'm refraining myself from saying exactly what I think of these ignorant folk!

More people die from alcohol and smoking as opposed to giving homeless people money for their next fix!!

So don't hand me that 'You're contributing to their demise nonsense!"


Just so you're not running around telling people alcohol is more dangerous than crack, here's one UK summary of the study you've been incorrectly referring to.


Alcohol is more dangerous than illegal drugs such as heroin and crack cocaine - when the ripple effect on society is taken into consideration, a new British study has found.

British experts said alcohol was most destructive because it was so widely used and had devastating consequences not only for drinkers but for those around them.

The study evaluated substances including alcohol, cocaine, heroin, ecstasy and marijuana, ranking them based on how destructive they were to the individuals who took them and to society as a whole.

Researchers analysed how addictive a drug was and how it harmed the human body, in addition to other criteria such as environmental damage caused by the drug, its role in breaking up families and its economic costs, such as healthcare, social services and prison.

Heroin, crack cocaine and methamphetamine, or crystal meth, were by far the most lethal to individuals.


Claro? Giving money to someone addicted to any of these drugs would be very much detrimental to their individual health. You are in fact leading them directly into personal danger. Crackheads are scary people and need to stop doing drugs before any meaningful progress can be made in their lives. You don't have the luxury of a lifetime of crack use before you die of liver failure.
 cookie22222
Joined: 8/4/2007
Msg: 155
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Homeless asking for Money....
Posted: 11/19/2010 5:03:56 AM
To the point of having a bank account - sure you can cash a paycheck at Walmart, or a check cashing place for a small fee - but what if an employer doesn't give you a check, just uses direct deposit? I don't have a choice where I work - no bank account, no way to pay you, no job. Many employers use direct deposit exclusively.
 daynadaze
Joined: 2/11/2008
Msg: 156
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Homeless asking for Money....
Posted: 11/19/2010 10:12:08 AM
It's not uncommon to be paid by either direct deposit or given a card that costs you 5 dollars every time you use it, done so you get a checking account after getting tired of being ripped off. I thought it was weird the first time I heard of it too but yep, some places will only pay you if they can direct deposit it into your account. You'd think people would rise up and protest such a stupid thing but I guess most people have checking accounts of some sort and it doesn't effect them.
 cookie22222
Joined: 8/4/2007
Msg: 157
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Homeless asking for Money....
Posted: 11/19/2010 11:36:59 AM
Both my sons have encountered a "no check" employer - one was Family Dollar, that used one of those cards that costs you $5 a month. I work for the County government and they do NOT issue checks, it is all direct deposit. I worked for a very large, tri-state construction company and it was the same thing.

Many employers have this in place because it saves them money.
 StevieCashmere
Joined: 4/22/2009
Msg: 158
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Homeless asking for Money....
Posted: 11/27/2010 1:15:02 PM
In London, UK there are more Temporary Housing Shelter than homeless people on average, however rules of No Alcohol or drugs cannot often be met

~Stevie
 Vannili
Joined: 7/8/2008
Msg: 160
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Homeless asking for Money....
Posted: 12/20/2010 8:09:42 AM
Everybody needs money,specially the homeless,even they are feed,sheltered (not all the time),clothed, (St.Vincent issued them voucher for clothing with limited time) and have medical aid for them. But they still beg for money. And those homeless live only twice a year, Thanksgiving and Christmas all the people remembered them on these two days to make them happy...
Money is primary important in a person's life it is a power to live a decent life with dignity. Even just to buy a cigarret/popsoda that makes him a whole person.I always hand them a dollar, When I was working and have not experienced yet the pinch of economy I gave $20,10 or 5. And I don't care how they spend that money if they buy cocain,booze, ect. , my point is that someone knows they are special human beings and someone cares for them.
 OMG!WTF!
Joined: 12/3/2007
Msg: 161
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Homeless asking for Money....
Posted: 12/21/2010 6:01:47 AM
If a man helps a starving dog become prosperous, the dog will not bite the man. That's the principal difference between a man and a dog. --- Mark Twain
 Earthpuppy
Joined: 2/9/2008
Msg: 163
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Homeless asking for Money....
Posted: 12/21/2010 4:29:37 PM
Anecdotal "evidence" aka, stories, are always reasuring to our prejudices, our superiority over the unwashed masses, and help the thus-far lucky ones feel superior. The homeless I have known over the years were just like us lucky ones, till the luck ran dry. The focus on the substance abusers, aka, mentally ill, untreated Veterans, domestic violence victims, and others who fell into the negative feedback loop, along with their families, kids and other circles, feels good to us superior beings who would never, ever, fall that low. It's a comfort to feel superior. It's also a false personal promise to ourselves that it could never happen to US. With a third of the US population bordering on starvation in our economic meltdown, we need, more than ever, the fantasy that the American Weigh, will never let us down. That with applied grit, willingness to work as slaves, dehumanized, degraded at every turn, that we can prevail. Easy to imagine if you have not yet hit that rock bottom place. Easy to imagine if you have never been sent to wars, been beaten by a spouse, been beaten by teen punks, been downsized or offshored, had a major illness and then dropped by your health care "provider", had your house stolen by your trusted bank of decades, then divorced, then hit with disease, then hit with denial of benifits, etc..

There are two camps here as usual. Those who have empathy, and those who do not, given the luck of the draw thus far. We will all end up in the same camp given the trends of late. Living the fantasy of security is a good thing until it comes back to bite hard.
 softy63
Joined: 7/13/2008
Msg: 164
Homeless asking for Money....
Posted: 12/21/2010 6:24:25 PM
Last Christmas Eve I was disgusted to see a lady sitting on the ground in front of a shopping complex holding up a sign which read "Please give to the... blah blah blah ... Childrens Hospital."

There's no such hospital but the hat next to her was filled with money.

I was appalled at her deceipt. Playing on the heart strings of people who really thought they were giving to help sick children.

I've also seen people spending Charity funded food vouchers on useless things like cases of Coke, lollies and biscuits.

Its a shame because people like these put doubt in people's mind as to how desperate they really are.

I give what limited money I have to reputable charities to help those in need rather than the individual.
 Rythmn
Joined: 1/21/2006
Msg: 165
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Homeless asking for Money....
Posted: 12/22/2010 1:01:08 AM
I use my intuition and some info from people on the streets. Very rarely, I will give cash. Most of the time, I buy food. Most of my charities go to places that serve them. Many ARE hungry. but, many would still use the money for drugs. I figure, not into supporting the latter, but will do the best I can with food and donations that help people out of homelessness.

Having worked with teens from the "system", I know first hand that many had options. I also know that many kids from well to do homes, are out having fun with this. I also know they are mentally ill and post trauma victims out there. So, my way of handling the latter group is "food". Most are wandering and not willing/able to do the societal thing of landing a "normal" job, etc. However, lately many working people are homeless and many people who have lost jobs, just like you or me, are living out of their cars--that is, if they are lucky to have a car.

You need to use your intuition and if not sure, but want to do "something" give to food banks. Their needs are accelerating rapidly and funds are diminishing. Carry high protein items if you give out food.

Remember: There but for the grace of your Higher Power, go "YOU", especially in today's economy.
 cookie22222
Joined: 8/4/2007
Msg: 166
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Homeless asking for Money....
Posted: 12/22/2010 6:10:26 AM
^^^Amen to that. I work for county government. Our commissioners are fighting over the 2011 budget. If nothing is signed by Dec. 31st - we will stop being paid. I've got my fingers crossed that it does not happen, but if it does...no idea what I, and many of my co-workers, will do.
 flyguy51
Joined: 8/11/2005
Msg: 167
Homeless asking for Money....
Posted: 12/22/2010 2:29:20 PM
I sometimes do, sometimes don't. I like to help people out, but I often doubt that handing out money does a panhandler any good in the long run. Unlike some here, I do not see panhandling as a legitimate pursuit, and honesty is not a common character trait with it. I prefer to give to institutions rather than individuals. I have found that you can't really help a person who is not willing to improve his situation. Many, of course, are mentally ill, which is a tough enough problem with all the resources and luxuries in the world at one's disposal, let alone out on the street with nothing.
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