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 Dynan3
Joined: 11/28/2012
Msg: 27
Vipassana MeditationPage 2 of 5    (1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
When I am a good boy. That is the goal, but the reality is that I am a deeply programmed individual. I'm still at the breakover point where, instead of realizing that meditation is the best thing to do for myself and the world around me, it is still an effort and a sacrifice. I guess when you find comfort in the meditation, that is when your feet are firmly planted on the path that ends all suffering...and not just the physical, incarnate tribulations.

I'm so glad you have this thread going. I never would have believed that vipassana is so wide spread. I heard (how true it is, I don't know) that when 0.1% of the population engage seriously in this endeavor, that awareness of the entire world will make a quantum jump to a new reality of truth and compassion. I guess this is at variance with vipassana teaching of taking reality AS IT IS, not as we want it to be...but it's Christmas, so I let myself believe in Santa Claus (Buddha Claus) a little bit.
 Dynan3
Joined: 11/28/2012
Msg: 28
Vipassana Meditation
Posted: 12/21/2012 9:06:57 AM
As my son keep reminding me...ANY sit is a good sit. Sitting while enduring shift work is difficult. (I did shifts most of my working career.) A Herculean effort is needed, but that makes it all the more effective.



<div class='quote'>You could almost predict which ones would, just based on how they presented themselves in the silence. Which is another thing.. it's amazing how 'loud' things are in noble silence. How much you can see about another. You feel like you know each other, yet you haven't spoken a word to many of them. So interesting.

During the course, I would formulate all these ideas about who people were. Some were models to be emulated, and others were a pain in the ass. BUT, on the tenth day, I was usually blown away by how wrong I was...both directions! And, if nothing else, you know that you are with people who, against tremendous odds and with past grace, actually SAT a dhamma course. Nothing could be a deeper eternal blessing than being set correctly on a path that will positively lead to the cessation of suffering, for themselves and those around them. There are no guarantees. Practice is the only thing that will get you to the goal. I hope to do enough practice that it will carry over into the next turn around the wheel, 'cuz I know I don't have nearly enough of the paramitas to make it this time...I think.

(P.S. The hundredth was found to swim to the new island =^)
 JustDukky
Joined: 7/8/2004
Msg: 29
Vipassana Meditation
Posted: 12/29/2012 1:41:05 AM
I wonder what form of meditation Srinivasa Ramanujan used...Whatever it was, I'd like to try it!

This post is really more in the way of a profound bit of scientific/mathematical news and I was wondering where to post it. After reading it, I'm sure you'll agree this topic is most appropriate. I'm quite sure being a hindu, he meditated quite a bit before he died, so his insights probably came from that.:

Mathematician's Century-Old Secrets Unlocked

While on his death bed, the brilliant Indian mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan cryptically wrote down functions he said came to him in dreams, with a hunch about how they behaved. Now 100 years later, researchers say they've proved he was right.

"We've solved the problems from his last mysterious letters. For people who work in this area of math, the problem has been open for 90 years," Emory University mathematician Ken Ono said.

Ramanujan, a self-taught mathematician born in a rural village in South India, spent so much time thinking about math that he flunked out of college in India twice, Ono said.
But he sent mathematicians letters describing his work, and one of the most preeminent ones, English mathematician G. H. Hardy, recognized the Indian boy's genius and invited him to Cambridge University in England to study. While there, Ramanujan published more than 30 papers and was inducted into the Royal Society.
"For a brief window of time, five years, he lit the world of math on fire," Ono told LiveScience.
But the cold weather eventually weakened Ramanujan's health, and when he was dying, he went home to India.
It was on his deathbed in 1920 that he described mysterious functions that mimicked theta functions, or modular forms, in a letter to Hardy. Like trigonometric functions such as sine and cosine, theta functions have a repeating pattern, but the pattern is much more complex and subtle than a simple sine curve. Theta functions are also "super-symmetric," meaning that if a specific type of mathematical function called a Moebius transformation is applied to the functions, they turn into themselves. Because they are so symmetric these theta functions are useful in many types of mathematics and physics, including string theory.
Ramanujan believed that 17 new functions he discovered were "mock modular forms" that looked like theta functions when written out as an infinite sum (their coefficients get large in the same way), but weren't super-symmetric. Ramanujan, a devout Hindu, thought these patterns were revealed to him by the goddess Namagiri.
Ramanujan died before he could prove his hunch. But more than 90 years later, Ono and his team proved that these functions indeed mimicked modular forms, but don't share their defining characteristics, such as super-symmetry.
The expansion of mock modular forms helps physicists compute the entropy, or level of disorder, of black holes.
In developing mock modular forms, Ramanujan was decades ahead of his time, Ono said; mathematicians only figured out which branch of math these equations belonged to in 2002.
"Ramanujan's legacy, it turns out, is much more important than anything anyone would have guessed when Ramanujan died," Ono said.
The findings were presented last month at the Ramanujan 125 conference at the University of Florida, ahead of the 125th anniversary of the mathematician's birth on Dec. 22.

http://www.newsforage.com/2012/12/mathematicians-century-old-secrets.html
 aremeself
Joined: 12/31/2008
Msg: 30
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Vipassana Meditation
Posted: 12/29/2012 3:38:09 PM
so how did the truth [true happiness] become so hard to find?

I meditate on the creator, like, how the h-ll did he do it all!!
 aremeself
Joined: 12/31/2008
Msg: 31
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Vipassana Meditation
Posted: 12/29/2012 4:01:34 PM
he did, lol!

ok, lets not get hung up on that.
 aremeself
Joined: 12/31/2008
Msg: 32
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Posted: 12/29/2012 5:44:16 PM
I don't know what you mean. form? there has to be a form?

Ok, like I said, I just think about the creator and his works.

now that might not work so well if you think that everything got here by whatever other in vogue methods there are.
 aremeself
Joined: 12/31/2008
Msg: 33
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Vipassana Meditation
Posted: 12/30/2012 6:59:52 PM
I can explain more if you want, it's no big deal.

but, let me ask you as to how you think everything got to exist from nothing?
or
do you think something have to give it a shove [a strong extremely organized push]?
 _shakti_
Joined: 7/5/2011
Msg: 34
Vipassana Meditation
Posted: 1/14/2013 8:13:16 PM
^^ The thought of creation isn't what inspires my meditations.. but I think that's cool that it is what makes yours juicy :)

I think I am going to do another Vipassana retreat in April, sucker for punishment I guess, lol..
 RussArtLover
Joined: 5/13/2010
Msg: 35
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Vipassana Meditation
Posted: 2/6/2013 9:54:40 PM
I call it deprogramming when I'm alone with my thoughts. It's human nature to try to make sense from daily experiences but if they include TV or associating with people that watch a lot of TV then the mind gets programmed with unnatural information. A trip to the park to sit by the river or just going for a drive on a lonely freeway was usually my most efficient way to deprogram, clear my head, get my smile back. Didn't always work of course, probably why I drink alone, help it along. I'd never try anyone elses discipline because I sensed I would be manipulated or RE-programmed instead of DE-programmed. My nirvana.
 DameWrite
Joined: 2/27/2010
Msg: 36
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Vipassana Meditation
Posted: 2/6/2013 11:39:05 PM
I don't focus, I just open up and allow my being to be shared, tingled, tuned, passed through, swelled, lifted, made buoyant... My breathing is like not breathing but almost a giving it up and sharing as if I stopped fighting for life and peacefully drowned.

No control. No ego. Allowing the energy to find it's way, through me around me...

I don't know what to call it, so I call it Ekawa

Always done outside, body exposed to the elements. In fresh water or sea or on the earth, air all around.
 _shakti_
Joined: 7/5/2011
Msg: 37
Vipassana Meditation
Posted: 2/9/2013 10:01:33 AM
See that's awesome, I think there are many ways to meditate.. and all are beneficial :)

So I applied for the next retreat in April, but I haven't received acceptance yet (although a friend of mine did after just two days!) and the teacher who lives a province away, called to ask questions about my application.. sounds intense!

I'm betting it's because I admitted I still practice kundalini yoga/meditation. They like to keep their style pure and unmixed. Hopefully they still let me in though.
 ManhHeartLove
Joined: 10/20/2012
Msg: 38
Vipassana Meditation
Posted: 2/13/2013 4:30:12 PM
yes have a pal who does the 2 week retreat each summer yes i have some info on the prison program Vipassana love to pass it on to you.
 ManhHeartLove
Joined: 10/20/2012
Msg: 39
Vipassana Meditation
Posted: 2/13/2013 4:35:35 PM
do follow the middle road beauty road pureland school of buddhism too quan shih yin quiet heart meditation too heart diamond lotus path too .
 ManhHeartLove
Joined: 10/20/2012
Msg: 40
Vipassana Meditation
Posted: 2/13/2013 4:36:45 PM
Qi gong daoism too to empty the empty pure emptiness
 ManhHeartLove
Joined: 10/20/2012
Msg: 41
Vipassana Meditation
Posted: 2/13/2013 4:37:33 PM
to slow the fast mind and body down the chinese call the restless monkey mind. wu wei no me .
 ManhHeartLove
Joined: 10/20/2012
Msg: 42
Vipassana Meditation
Posted: 2/13/2013 4:40:32 PM
my qi gong teacher taught to smile with the heart the inner smile to use the mind to correct the mind.. TCM when i was at a buddhist mountain in china my chinese guide told me the red characters written on the face of the buddhist mountain said a buddhist saying..... to clean the heart and wash the mind.... so simple yet so hard
 _shakti_
Joined: 7/5/2011
Msg: 43
Vipassana Meditation
Posted: 2/14/2013 3:59:20 PM

yes have a pal who does the 2 week retreat each summer
Where is that at? The longest option locally for me is the 10 day retreat. I have heard that some people travel to do longer retreats though.

Do you practice this style of meditation yourself?

yes i have some info on the prison program
Have you seen the documentaries on it?

There are two (that I know of) in the works in Canada, I asked about starting something local on my last retreat, will do so again during my next one in April.

Btw... for anyone who has a regular practice and a smart phone, insight timer app is absolutely amazing. I seriously couldn't live without it anymore!
 mrtonks
Joined: 2/19/2013
Msg: 44
Vipassana Meditation
Posted: 2/25/2013 3:47:38 AM
The time of duality has come and gone we are now moving to a triad period in earth and mans evolution, until we are able to leave earthly Karma behind we cannot move forward, Karma keeps us anchored to this vibration and all it's short falls. Triad gives us a grey area between negative and positive light and dark good and bad, a place for the human mind to leave the body yet still be able to absorb a higher form of life and the why's.
 _shakti_
Joined: 7/5/2011
Msg: 45
Vipassana Meditation
Posted: 2/25/2013 11:24:16 AM
^^ I'm curious what all of that has to do with meditation?
 Albvs
Joined: 2/14/2013
Msg: 46
Vipassana Meditation
Posted: 2/25/2013 4:32:23 PM

Within my first couple weeks of meditating, I got to the point where my whole body would tingle intensely and I felt like I didn't weigh anything.

Sounds like you were beginning to have an OOB experience but you freaked and snapped back.
 Sure_Dance_A_Lot
Joined: 11/20/2012
Msg: 47
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Vipassana Meditation
Posted: 2/25/2013 10:57:22 PM
I'm going to go do my first dhamma service after 5 ten day retreats over about 10 years. I am hoping that the service will help solidify my practice once again.
 _shakti_
Joined: 7/5/2011
Msg: 48
Vipassana Meditation
Posted: 2/26/2013 8:25:57 AM
^^5 of them, wow! I'm curious, were any particularly more powerful?

I spoke with some of the old students and they practically all said that the first was the most intense.

I can't wait to serve! I would have this time, but feel I need to ground myself in the practice a bit more before I serve as some kind of an example to others.

I find the two, one hour sits a bit too much.. with shift work and being a single mom, so I do a half an hour daily. I figure as long as I have a daily practice, I can at least build on it later.
 Sure_Dance_A_Lot
Joined: 11/20/2012
Msg: 49
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Vipassana Meditation
Posted: 2/28/2013 3:49:37 PM
The first one is the most intense for the same reason one's first trip to a tropical island is most intense, everything is brand new, including the meditation style (Vipassana) and practice (ideally all day non-stop). Frankly I find my time at the center excruciatingly boring. :-) What I love and keeps me coming back is the feeling afterwards, that I am really living, unburdened by my-own self.

I think that you have the right attitude regarding the practice time. Certainly as a full time caregiver your time is divided. Better to walk in measured steps.
 _shakti_
Joined: 7/5/2011
Msg: 50
Vipassana Meditation
Posted: 3/1/2013 4:26:21 AM
What I found boring, were the three days of anapana.. I had no idea that a new technique would be taught eventually, so I imagined the rest of my time being consumed by nothing but incessant nostril breathing, and it made me want to scream!! Lol.. especially when people around me decided to fart..... kinda difficult to be equanimous about that!

I felt really vulnerable after, but totally renewed. I just wish that I didn't have to go home to a bunch of negative experiences. I wasn't really prepared for that and it brought me down fairly quickly. I'm hoping for a different after-experience this time.

Although, I suppose that isn't very equanimous of me, lol..

Did you notice changes/upsets in your life following the retreats you did?
 Sure_Dance_A_Lot
Joined: 11/20/2012
Msg: 51
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Posted: 3/3/2013 10:53:16 PM
I don't believe that serious meditation has much to do with relaxation. From what I understand a lot comes crashing down in the process of 'cleaning'. I've lost a lot of friends, am letting go of a lot of things that while I never really identified with, I was attached to. Eventually, I imagine, everything must go including the person that I think is me. But then again I really don't have many worldly responsibilities at the moment. ;-) So in the spirit of art, curiosity and the chance for something real I give myself to the process.

Even this whole dating thing... seem really foreign... like it's a waste of time. So yeah huge upsets. What's the purpose of life if there is no me, you or anything, if everything is one and none and all that jazz? From what I have read and heard from others there are usually a few hurdles to clear before the work becomes a little easier. Problem with me is that I'll do the work consistently for a few months and then just when things are 'happening' I'll fall off the proverbial Vipassana Wagon.

Best to be equanimous regarding our lack of equaniminity. ;-) hehe

One observation. Almost after every retreat I would get into arguments with my friend. Then I realized that after a Vipassana (and as long as I continued to meditate) I behaved differently, I didn't take any sh*t from anyone and I pretty much said whatever was one my mind to be honest.

I've heard is said from fellow mediators. "Better not to start meditating but if you do (start the practice) better finish." There comes a point when, due to personal experiences, there is no more stopping not without feeling that something was left unfinished.
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