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 c_deacon
Joined: 3/13/2005
Msg: 26
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Over 60, what do you men think about marriage?Page 2 of 24    (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24)
The statistics concerning marriage and divorce rates differ, depending on the study one researches and believes. It is common to consider 50% as the norm, but overall the rate for first time marriages has declined over the last 20 years or so, but for what reasons?

If one looks closer at the research, there are some reasons for this, such as taking longer now to marry the first time, not leaving your parents home until older, and those that choose to never marry at all, which has risen over the last 50 years. With this in mind, using the 50% rate is still the norm, and if you are one of those, which most of us are, the rate for a second marriage and divorce is over 60%, and a third over 70%.

I am including one link that shows some of this and it will lead you to other links for your own research, and for me, I will stand by my initial statement about marriage past 50. Unless children are involved, I see no pressing reason to try a second time, when the statistics show a failure rate much higher than a success rate. Just as many play the lottery and hope to win, someone has to sooner or later, but if one looked at the chances, one would be better served investing their money in other ways. I also think that of marriage when over 50 and the reasons for it!

http://www.divorcepad.com/rate/

cd
 BeckyHT
Joined: 1/1/2013
Msg: 27
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Over 60, what do you men think about marriage?
Posted: 6/20/2014 1:56:25 PM

I see no pressing reason to try a second time,

You're the type of guy I will avoid.

I do realize everyone has their own opinions.

Some people may think "living together" can be built on the same trust. And then some of those can give stories of how easy it is to break a "living together". My question, what exactly do you get out of "living together"?

I've a family member who thought things were going good, she moved into his condo. 5 months later, with no warning, he said he didn't love her. She had nothing protecting her, no help from him in moving back to the town of her original home. This is exactly the point I will make. Many women don't accumulate the assets/equity a man does, and often women will be the one to move in with the man (because the men think it just should be that way, and won't do the reverse or help towards a new solution.) Whatever choices a woman makes her whole life, it's in her best interest to protect herself and her assets, and have a fall-back plan. I always do.

Men who only want what they can get in bed, and no true consideration of a real relationship where both look out for each other, can keep on traveling down the road as far as I'm concerned.

The woman family member I mentioned, was hurt really bad... thank goodness for family to be there for her. She's finally moved on, learned her lesson, and has a much better boyfriend.. and we're happy too!
 daynadaze
Joined: 2/11/2008
Msg: 28
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Over 60, what do you men think about marriage?
Posted: 6/20/2014 2:22:15 PM
You get the same thing out of living together as you get out of getting married, except you don't go through a ceremony. There are states with laws that make it pretty much the same, and other states where you can just walk away, but if children are involved, nobody is walking away entanglement free. Your chances of getting hurt something awful are able to happen whether you marry or not.

Personally I'd rather be married if I'm going to live with someone, but that's just a personal preference probably brought on by living during a time when a lot of people get married. I've lived with one man one time and I am glad I didn't ever marry him, but that's a poor choice of a man on my part, if I found a man I loved and wanted to live with at this stage of my life, I'd want to marry him. Mostly I don't want either.

How would the women dumped after 5 months have been helped by being married? Not a lot of court/judge is going to give you when you've only been married 5 months, don't have children together, and you are certainly not going to get alimony for such a short marriage. You wouldn't be entitled to his assets yet. I don't see what she would have gained by marrying him but she would have lost the cost of divorcing him. Marriage is basically to protect the rights and family name of the children, or a business transaction for women when women weren't as likely to be able to support themselves. With DNA testing you can prove or disprove the child's parents, and women are just as able to work and own property, etc., so really being married or living together is more a personal choice than some sort of protection. Even insurance is beginning to not be a need to be married and have access to the other's spousal insurance.
 Maleman999
Joined: 2/14/2010
Msg: 29
Over 60, what do you men think about marriage?
Posted: 6/20/2014 2:59:09 PM

My question, what exactly do you get out of "living together"?


The same thing you get when living together in a marriage that has that piece of paper. That piece of paper doesn't make a relationship any better or worse.


5 months later, with no warning, he said he didn't love her. She had nothing protecting her...


Protecting her from what? How does a marriage license protect her, and make the guy change his mind about loving her? Who is at fault if the woman is totally helpless and never learned how to take care of herself?

{quote] Many women don't accumulate the assets/equity a man does.....it's in her best interest to protect herself and her assets, and have a fall-back plan.

That pretty much answers my previous question. It sounds like the "protection" and back-up plan is the ability to take a guy to divorce court and try to clean him out of his assets-or at least take a minimum of half of the assets. It's the revenge factor.
One case of a family member that didn't have a fairy tale happily-ever-after ending does not mean every common-law relationship will end badly. Some are very successful at making it work without any superficial ceremony. How many cases of marriages end badly?
 BeckyHT
Joined: 1/1/2013
Msg: 30
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Over 60, what do you men think about marriage?
Posted: 6/20/2014 3:44:15 PM
Protecting her from what? How does a marriage license protect her, and make the guy change his mind about loving her? Who is at fault if the woman is totally helpless and never learned how to take care of herself?

We're both generalizing here. What's this "totally helpless"? What if she was the primary raiser of children and didn't work or held limited jobs for 30 years or so? That is usually the case. Doesn't she deserve half the equity buildup? Yes, she does. And I've known men to be the at-home caregiver. Same for him.
And why do you say "clean him out of his assets"? In a marriage, anything earned or equity buildup is shared, it shouldn't be 'hers' and 'his'. Assets coming into a marriage can be protected by a pre-nup.

I just love this "revenge factor" directed at women. And the one sided "clean him out". Not. It's a bit one sided.
Try working in the courts, and see both sides of the story.

People keep repeating the same mistakes. My family member made a mistake. She trusted. It was wine and dine and expensive gifts, until he changed his mind. Sure taught me something. Who do you trust?
 LAgoodguy
Joined: 8/21/2008
Msg: 31
Over 60, what do you men think about marriage?
Posted: 6/20/2014 5:45:23 PM
BeckyHT I got a question to you why didn't your family member had any money saved???
You see I noticed that women tend to spend more money on them selves be it buying shoes or going out with there girlfriends which is the reason why many women do not accumulate money in the bank.
Did your friend help pay rent??? As it tends to happen men tend to pay more in a relationship. why cant some women save the money and not relay on the men to support them and help them pay the bills
From what you posted I get the feeling that marriage is what women would use to protect there future and the ability to buy more shoes and go out with there girlfriends. I guess it all does comes down to money.
 Blue-Eyes-Shine
Joined: 11/26/2008
Msg: 32
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Over 60, what do you men think about marriage?
Posted: 6/20/2014 11:02:02 PM
My 4 years younger brother who never married, is getting married next weekend. :-) I thought he was against marriage, evidently not, now that he's found the right one. I say it depends on the individual, timing and love.
 c_deacon
Joined: 3/13/2005
Msg: 33
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Over 60, what do you men think about marriage?
Posted: 6/21/2014 10:31:50 AM
I am sorry Becky that you feel the need to pigeon hole me as one to avoid, but that is all part of life and dating, and even though I may not agree with your thought process on dating leading to marriage, I would not throw you out with the bath water because of that one factor.....;)

My thoughts are that of finding an equal, and once found, share experiences together, adventures, vacations, and enjoyment, not combining assets, and forcing a contract that one may use over the other if failure happens at a later date, or the relationship has run its course. How hard can this be? You have yours, and I have mine, we share equally but not force either of us to have to pay for the other in any fashion.

I would never expect or tell you to sell your home and move in with me, nor would I expect you to let me be on your bank accounts and take charge of your finances. I would not want you to expect that of me moving in with you and selling my place, or letting you be in charge of my assets. Why not just enjoy and share as one feels comfortable with and let the other decide if that equation works for them too? We can still stay with each other and share home locations, take mutual trips or take turns planning and paying for them, along with dates and adventures.

Why can we not cook and clean together, or better yet, pay to have someone clean for us while we play? Is that not the goal of being totally independent? The ability to enjoy what you have, and use it the way you want to, and with whomever you want to share with, is just one more example of equality on all levels. Far to many might want to start out that way, but once they see more is available if they do this and do that, they change from being relationship partners, to being business partners, and I for one did that and been there, and will not do that again.

Do not give up anything when with another that enjoys you, and if you need to combine something, make it your happiness, not your wallet for your own protection. So, avoid me if you will, but know this, I am a complicated man that seeks equality in life, love, and participation, and I bring to the table what I am looking for.......do you??

cd
 Maleman999
Joined: 2/14/2010
Msg: 34
Over 60, what do you men think about marriage?
Posted: 6/21/2014 3:18:46 PM
A question for BeckyHT and the others who want marriage to be the ultimate goal: If you find someone who might have potential, how long of a courtship are you expecting? Being 60+, you're no longer a spring chicken who can date indefinitely-possibly for years-like young people can before deciding if this is the One. But with that being said, would you advise your kids to take their time in the dating scene to make sure they found the right One for life-no matter how long that takes-even if it's years? If you preach that to your kids, would you follow your own advice, which means it could take dating a lot of people to finally find someone who passes the check list, and when you narrow it down, it could take a lot of dating and time to make sure you found the right one? Or do you feel Father Time is breathing down your neck, making you lower your standards and rushing the mate hunting process, hoping to find someone you can at least tolerate, even if the person doesn't look like the latest Hollywood sex symbol? When you get older, time is not on your side and everyone ends up looking their age.
 bucsgirl
Joined: 5/13/2006
Msg: 35
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Over 60, what do you men think about marriage?
Posted: 6/21/2014 5:33:53 PM
I get lots of emails from men over 60 and even over 7o, as I'm sure many others do too. I was widowed young (34) raised all 4 of my kids by myself, put myself not only through college, but graduate school (with honors). Bit whoop, thing is I'm a self made woman, accomplished. That's my professional life, personally, I not only would have to be with someone who understood that, but celebrated that.
It sounds simple, but it's ohhh...so not. Men 60 plus, retired and not only have no direction or purpose, but usually want to bore you to death with who they were and what they did. Living in the past....who would be interested in someone who is living in their past which is gone, and doesn't have anything they're interested or invested it?

THAT is what makes older men uninteresting....to me...marrying them? Pfft..it takes a lot of patience to sit for 15 minutes over a cup of coffee. When someone can only converse about what they've done....then I can't imagine sharing a life with someone revistiting their history day in day out.
 daynadaze
Joined: 2/11/2008
Msg: 36
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Over 60, what do you men think about marriage?
Posted: 6/21/2014 5:58:58 PM
Personally, if I were to find someone I'd want to marry, it would be a long time before it got to that point. I've been married twice, way back in my 20s and all that get a guy/get married/repent later is not for me. Ugh. I would never marry again without knowing the man inside and out, his friends, his family his habits, he values, etc. And it's not just for me either, I don't want him marrying me without knowing all my flaws and habits. Father time, well if I die I die, not like rushing around is going to keep that from happening. If I die without another husband in my life, which I'm 100% sure I will, that's how it goes.
 DragonBits
Joined: 1/6/2012
Msg: 37
Over 60, what do you men think about marriage?
Posted: 6/22/2014 7:02:46 AM

I get lots of emails from men over 60 and even over 7o, as I'm sure many others do too. I was widowed young (34) raised all 4 of my kids by myself, put myself not only through college, but graduate school (with honors). Bit whoop, thing is I'm a self made woman, accomplished. That's my professional life, personally, I not only would have to be with someone who understood that, but celebrated that.
It sounds simple, but it's ohhh...so not. Men 60 plus, retired and not only have no direction or purpose, but usually want to bore you to death with who they were and what they did. Living in the past....who would be interested in someone who is living in their past which is gone, and doesn't have anything they're interested or invested it?

THAT is what makes older men uninteresting....to me...marrying them? Pfft..it takes a lot of patience to sit for 15 minutes over a cup of coffee. When someone can only converse about what they've done....then I can't imagine sharing a life with someone revistiting their history day in day out.


Not really sure I understand the difference between you and what you don't like in most older men.

You talk about your past, your accomplishments, and want someone that celebrates your past. (First a trivial question, how someone celebrates this? Not like we celebrate a birthday or anniversary?)

But resent older men that celebrate their past, their accomplishments.

You both seem to be living in the past.

I am sure you must see a difference, but it isn't obvious from your post what the difference is between you and the men you can't tolerate for long?
 DragonBits
Joined: 1/6/2012
Msg: 38
Over 60, what do you men think about marriage?
Posted: 6/22/2014 7:44:16 AM

A question for BeckyHT and the others who want marriage to be the ultimate goal: If you find someone who might have potential, how long of a courtship are you expecting? Being 60+, you're no longer a spring chicken who can date indefinitely-possibly for years-like young people can before deciding if this is the One. But with that being said, would you advise your kids to take their time in the dating scene to make sure they found the right One for life-no matter how long that takes-even if it's years? If you preach that to your kids, would you follow your own advice, which means it could take dating a lot of people to finally find someone who passes the check list, and when you narrow it down, it could take a lot of dating and time to make sure you found the right one? Or do you feel Father Time is breathing down your neck, making you lower your standards and rushing the mate hunting process, hoping to find someone you can at least tolerate, even if the person doesn't look like the latest Hollywood sex symbol? When you get older, time is not on your side and everyone ends up looking their age.


Since I am the only married person on the thread, I will take a stab.

My goal dating was to have fun with interesting women in exotic locations and to have a stimulating sex life. It was never a courtship. My wife's goal was more about a long term live in relationship, marriage wasn't necessary if I moved to her country.

I don't have children, so I avoid the whole crazy idea why my adult children should in any way dictate my life. Stuff like would I want my daughter to marry an older man, take drugs like many of us did in the 70s, or expect that she would follow my advice about dating.

Is anyone wise enough that they can make a rule about how long one should date when you don't even know who the adult kids will be dating? Crazy to me, they could be dating the ideal mate, or a future serial killer. The ideal mate you should marry soon, the other you should never marry as long as you live no matter how long you date. So the rule depends on who you are dating, not how long. But I would say give it at least a year after becoming intimate, and I personally don't become monogamous till marriage or at least a formal engagement. (I think it gives me a different perspective on how inflated I really am. I am one of those people you should never assume anything and should have that talk with. )

But I spent 42 years dating various women from all walks of life, that seems like a lot of time to me.

I don't have very high standards for dating, but for marriage my standards have risen the older I get. I am always attracted to a sexy woman, but she doesn't have to be a Hollywood sex symbol. But I have noticed, my standard for a really hot women is a lot higher than most men, maybe 1 out of 1000 would make me turn my head, maybe happens once every 5 years.

Time is sometimes on our side, but is often the enemy, it depends on the situation. I think some people look older or younger than their chronological age, they usually continue to look younger or older than their chronological age, it doesn't change. For instance, BeckyHT looks more like 50 than 61, at 71 she will likely look more like 61.

However, really not sure about what you are getting at when you say everyone eventually looks like their age? Does that mean my wife will eventually look old to me, or that I will get older looking as time goes on? And why should we care about that?
 BeckyHT
Joined: 1/1/2013
Msg: 39
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Over 60, what do you men think about marriage?
Posted: 6/22/2014 11:15:02 AM


My thoughts are that of finding an equal, and once found, share experiences together, adventures, vacations, and enjoyment, not combining assets, and forcing a contract that one may use over the other if failure happens at a later date, or the relationship has run its course. How hard can this be? You have yours, and I have mine, we share equally but not force either of us to have to pay for the other in any fashion.

I would never expect or tell you to sell your home and move in with me, nor would I expect you to let me be on your bank accounts and take charge of your finances. I would not want you to expect that of me moving in with you and selling my place, or letting you be in charge of my assets. Why not just enjoy and share as one feels comfortable with and let the other decide if that equation works for them too? We can still stay with each other and share home locations, take mutual trips or take turns planning and paying for them, along with dates and adventures.

Why can we not cook and clean together, or better yet, pay to have someone clean for us while we play? Is that not the goal of being totally independent? The ability to enjoy what you have, and use it the way you want to, and with whomever you want to share with, is just one more example of equality on all levels. Far to many might want to start out that way, but once they see more is available if they do this and do that, they change from being relationship partners, to being business partners, and I for one did that and been there, and will not do that again.

,snip>, I am a complicated man that seeks equality in life, love, and participation, and I bring to the table what I am looking for.......do you??

cd

I’m not sure you’re any more complicated than other men.

What you describe, is a part-time relationship. How is it that you’ve “shared equally”? You’ve been on these forums for some time. You’re a good looking man, you’re still young enough (8 years younger then me) so surely you’ve had relationships. Has there been a woman in these years you thought you were in love with, and she with you? Have you stayed together (that would mean through today, yes?)

For me, a part-time relationship is not a real relationship. It’s just dabbling for fun. And lonely lots of the time.
 NoBuddies_Fool
Joined: 6/10/2014
Msg: 40
Over 60, what do you men think about marriage?
Posted: 6/22/2014 11:50:31 AM

THAT is what makes older men uninteresting....to me...marrying them? Pfft..it takes a lot of patience to sit for 15 minutes over a cup of coffee. When someone can only converse about what they've done....then I can't imagine sharing a life with someone revistiting their history day in day out.

Aaahh but yes!! The old..."I was...I use to"....as my eyes are glazing over!

My thoughts are that of finding an equal, and once found, share experiences together, adventures, vacations, and enjoyment, not combining assets, and forcing a contract that one may use over the other if failure happens at a later date, or the relationship has run its course. How hard can this be? You have yours, and I have mine, we share equally but not force either of us to have to pay for the other in any fashion.

Sounds perfect to me!!!
I know a lot of my friends male/female find nothing wrong with this outlook on life.
Trick is....as in anything,is to find someone on the same page as you are and don't be "stupid"....
 the_regency
Joined: 12/20/2013
Msg: 41
Over 60, what do you men think about marriage?
Posted: 6/22/2014 1:10:18 PM
^^^Not unless he talks about himself incessantly. Here in the over 45 section, this gripe is legit and still applicable, a hold over from the male privilege chauvinism era. The guys think it's all about them because it was all about them, sanctioned by our society for a very long long time. Viva la revolution!
 c_deacon
Joined: 3/13/2005
Msg: 42
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Over 60, what do you men think about marriage?
Posted: 6/22/2014 3:46:50 PM
So Becky........You feel that anything short of marriage in a relationship is just part time and dabbling.....or not real? I am truly sorry that you feel this way, and whatever has driven you to this conclusion is sad, and in my eyes....just wrong.

I have some friends and family members that have never married and have been living together for 10 to 20 years, very happy, and very in love, as they describe that. They share what they care to for themselves and how they have worked it out, and set the ground rules that are agreeable to both. If they have children from a previous relationship, they have dealt with those issues, assets, and consequences for the time that they may not be continuing, or one passes on. Some have used their other home(s) as rentals and make sure that the bills are paid equally, and yet each has their own assets and bank accounts.

I do not call this "part-time", nor do I say that they are just dabbling for fun, and lonely much of the time. I say just the opposite, and I am happy for them, even helped some, set up their finances to work in such a way, that neither would have any surprises or be hurt at a later date if something changed in their relationship......and I do call it a relationship. I have other friends that have been married for many years and stay just for the assets, the convenience, the kids, on and on, but truly they are the ones that are lonely much of the time, dabbling in fun as they can find it and not in a real relationship at all.

As for me, relationships can come and go, along with caring and concern for one another, but I do not and will not subscribe to the concept that one set of rules, and one format must be the same for all, or it is not a relationship, and not full time. Just as I will not be willing to have more children, which does not mean that I do not enjoy my child and others that I have been with, but more that my time procreating is over, and my time for marriage is as well........not for relationships. This does not make me a part-time Dad, or not committed to my son and his life, and I believe that just because I do not want to marry again, does not make me a part-time relationship.

cd
 mjinict
Joined: 8/13/2008
Msg: 43
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Over 60, what do you men think about marriage?
Posted: 6/22/2014 6:14:22 PM
So...cd, (and those like him). Are you saying you would not get involved with anyone that didn't have the same income as you even if they are self supporting, living paycheck to measly paycheck? If they lived within their means? I understand not wanting to financially support anyone, but I don't think that's the issue here. You keep talking about 'equals' ...just curious.
 c_deacon
Joined: 3/13/2005
Msg: 44
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Over 60, what do you men think about marriage?
Posted: 6/22/2014 7:51:01 PM
Ah mjinict........Very good question, and one that deserves hopefully an intelligent answer.

Being an equal does not mean just paychecks or education, but they can be a part of the mix of the whole. Being an equal is the total of all the parts put together in such a way, that they end up being the same in many ways, even if they are put together differently. It is very much like how a personality can make up for some other factors that one might be interested in, and how it fits with all the remaining parts.

Making the same amount of money as I do is not the issue, but more so your expectations of what I should do about that if it is the case. Having the same amount of education as I do is not the issue, but rather how one used their education to better their overall life, no matter the level. Owning your own home is not the issue, just as long as you do not feel then that you should have some privileges because I own mine. The list can go on and on and on.......and is not how much you have but much more about how it has made you who and what you are........past, present, and future.

It is more like what I see when a profile of someone I may be interested in, and it states the they prefer men over six feet tall, because they like to wear heels and look up to the one they are with. I can not dictate how tall I am, and some may enjoy me no matter my height, but in total, they are still looking for an equal for them, and that is someone that they can still look up to when in heels. Some women state that they want a full head of hair, and that is a deal breaker if some man is bald or has little hair, and maybe uses a pull-over. It is all a matter of preferences that they find appealing to them, therefore part of the equality equation.

Equality is in the eye of the beholder, just like looks, personality, and style, and just like all of them, they must fit in the puzzle in such a way, as to make it complete. It is not how much money you make, but rather how your money makes you, how your education makes you, and how it all has developed your personality and style.

cd
 DragonBits
Joined: 1/6/2012
Msg: 45
Over 60, what do you men think about marriage?
Posted: 6/23/2014 6:00:37 AM

c_deacon As for me, relationships can come and go


Deacon, how often does a woman in one of your relationships want to make the relationship more permanent, such as getting married or moving in together?
 seafoodandeatit
Joined: 12/23/2011
Msg: 46
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Over 60, what do you men think about marriage?
Posted: 6/23/2014 6:20:03 AM
No I would not marry again ever!
"if" I was to set up house with a woman she would be the major part of my life and very much
a part of my extended family.
I have been married once and lived with a woman (17 years) and with or with out a bit of paper
it was 100% commitment from me.
(and in Australia after about 3 months the woman has the same legal rights as if they were married.)
 Maleman999
Joined: 2/14/2010
Msg: 47
Over 60, what do you men think about marriage?
Posted: 6/23/2014 8:14:06 AM

(and in Australia after about 3 months the woman has the same legal rights as if they were married.)


After 3 months? That's absurd. So by day 89, there's pressure on guys to decide if they're with the right woman for the long haul, And if there's any doubt, it's best to end it before the government decides to marry you and your current partner without your consent. Isn't it wonderful living in a free country?



I've a family member who thought things were going good, she moved into his condo. 5 months later, with no warning, he said he didn't love her. She had nothing protecting her...


There's got to be more to the story than a guy having a woman move into his place, then waking up one day and telling her he doesn't love her and wants her out. Maybe there was some bad habit he couldn't tolerate or maybe she showed some craziness behavior which made him think twice about the living arrangement. In which case, this would be more of an endorsement for living together to truly find out who you're really with, instead of finding out after marriage that you made a mistake and have to go through the crap and expense of divorce. It's easier to move on in life if two people can make a clean split and part ways without anything tying them to each other, and no legal issues.
 Eric_Summit
Joined: 11/3/2009
Msg: 48
Over 60, what do you men think about marriage?
Posted: 6/23/2014 8:40:23 AM

Posted by seafoodandeatit:
"(and in Australia after about 3 months the woman has the same legal rights as if they were married.)"

If this is true precisely as it is written...it would be a HUGE detriment to stable long-term relationships.
A nation operating in this manner would observe their society bailing on relationships on a quarterly basis.
There is probably lots more detail to this law than what we are seeing here in this thread.

Posted by maleman999:
"After 3 months? That's absurd. So by day 89, there's pressure on guys to decide if they're with the right woman for the long haul. And if there's any doubt, it's best to end it before the government decides to marry you and your current partner without your consent. Isn't it wonderful living in a free country?"

You are 100% absolutely correct.
I believe much of this stuff about "Australian Marriage Law" is likely internet fantasy.
 DragonBits
Joined: 1/6/2012
Msg: 49
Over 60, what do you men think about marriage?
Posted: 6/23/2014 9:02:06 AM

I've a family member who thought things were going good, she moved into his condo. 5 months later, with no warning, he said he didn't love her. She had nothing protecting her, no help from him in moving back to the town of her original home. This is exactly the point I will make.


This seems quite reasonable, you don't get a money back guarantee with relationships.

I could just as well complain after 5 months of dating a woman, paying for some vacation together, spending a lot of money, she tells me she doesn't want anything more to do with me. Can I get 50% of the money I spent refunded?

Five months isn't much of a relationship no matter how much money is spent, and I have no idea about Australian law any more that Saudi law concerning assets. Every country has a different set of laws.
 FullMoonGuy
Joined: 3/7/2014
Msg: 50
Over 60, what do you men think about marriage?
Posted: 6/23/2014 12:14:24 PM

Whatever choices a woman makes her whole life, it's in her best interest to protect herself and her assets, and have a fall-back plan. I always do.


Yes, when both prior have the talk..... when thinking about living together or married, you both interested are first & for most !
And it must be mutually agreed, anything less, is wish full thinking hoping this is as good as it gets... & only will bite u on the butt later....


Maybe everyone should recite the Orange Lantern oath (from DC Comics Green Lantern) at the start of every "relationship":

"in Green Lantern #20 Larfleeze revealed his oath and his ring charged to 100% and it is as follows:"

"What's mine is mine
and mine and mine
And mine, and mine, and mine!
Not yours!"
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