Plentyoffish dating forums are a place to meet singles and get dating advice or share dating experiences etc. Hopefully you will all have fun meeting singles and try out this online dating thing... Remember that we are the largest free online dating service, so you will never have to pay a dime to meet your soulmate.
     
Show ALL Forums  > Off Topic  > So You Took An Ancestry DNA Test, Now What?      Home login  
 AUTHOR
 NJgirl116
Joined: 7/3/2015
Msg: 51
So You Took An Ancestry DNA Test, Now What?Page 3 of 3    (1, 2, 3)
^^^My test is lame! No alien DNA found... :(
 dragonbytes
Joined: 9/15/2015
Msg: 52
view profile
History
So You Took An Ancestry DNA Test, Now What?
Posted: 3/1/2016 9:00:59 AM
Patent #8,543,339 grants 23andMe exclusive rights to genetic and computer technologies that would enable prospective parents to handpick a sperm or egg donor with whom they would be likely to produce a child born with certain traits that they desire.

Interesting application, so how do you want to design your next baby?
 HawkingJr
Joined: 4/16/2007
Msg: 53
view profile
History
So You Took An Ancestry DNA Test, Now What?
Posted: 3/1/2016 10:45:47 AM
“It would have been far more intriguing if it had been Will Smith or Denzel Washington to have had an ancestor who owned slaves.”

Nearly all African Americans have ancestors who owned slaves. In fact, they didn’t just own them – they raped them. Hence, how these slave owners became their ancestors.

My results were 60% sub-Saharan African (the plurality of it Nigerian – have I ever got an offer for you!), one-third English and the rest of it Native American and East European. I was only surprised by the relative lack of Native American ancestry because for generations the mother’s side of my family has passed down stories about our ancestors having fought Andrew Jackson at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend until the rivers ran red with blood. That was a War of 1812 battle in Alabama (pre-statehood) between American soldiers and Creek Indians. To the best of my knowledge, no blacks were involved so those stories would have to come from Creeks. Yet I have only traces of Native American ancestry. Weird. I’d also kind of assumed I was Irish, not English, but I guess the rapin’ was more of an actual owner thing than an overseer thing. Since my mother is photogenetically white, I'd really like to see her results, but she refuses to take the test for some reason.

My best friend, who is proudly half-Italian and half-Cuban, discovered 4% sub-Saharan African ancestry in her DNA, and now refers to me as her “brother,” as opposed to before when I was just A brother.
 2ufo
Joined: 2/28/2015
Msg: 54
So You Took An Ancestry DNA Test, Now What?
Posted: 3/1/2016 4:32:15 PM
Y'all do know that an ancestry-type DNA test only follows on one branch of your family tree?
For women it's the mDNA (tracing mother's mother's mother's mother's mothers... etc... mother)
while
For men it's the yDNA (tracing father's father's father's father's... etc... father).

It leaves out entire orchards of your past.
 deetristate
Joined: 12/4/2014
Msg: 55
So You Took An Ancestry DNA Test, Now What?
Posted: 3/2/2016 6:46:07 AM
This is always interesting to me that people do this.
I have two cousins who are siblings of the same parents. One could be Angelina Jolie twin ten pounds heavier with a beach tan. Her brother can't get a taxi, looks like the man on criminal minds.

DNA test results would be the same and not change their everyday lives.

It is probably interesting, though.
 gtomustang
Joined: 6/16/2007
Msg: 56
So You Took An Ancestry DNA Test, Now What?
Posted: 3/2/2016 7:36:09 AM
off the top of my head, I think Hitler's idea of racial purity came from a misreading of Nietzsche, thinking the blond haired lion was the ubermensche. American eugenics of the 1920's might have helped. Funny how much the Nazis copped from other cultures--Stalin's Gulag, Madison Avenue sales, etc. I don't think anyone mentioned the interesting ancestry story:

http://genealogy.about.com/od/famous_family_trees/p/al_sharpton.htm

people love what ancestry might say about their identity.
 dragonbytes
Joined: 9/15/2015
Msg: 57
view profile
History
So You Took An Ancestry DNA Test, Now What?
Posted: 3/2/2016 8:21:30 AM

Y'all do know that an ancestry-type DNA test only follows on one branch of your family tree?
For women it's the mDNA (tracing mother's mother's mother's mother's mothers... etc... mother)
while
For men it's the yDNA (tracing father's father's father's father's... etc... father).

It leaves out entire orchards of your past.


Not what is claimed in this blog post about 23andme.

At present, 23andMe customers can trace two branches of their genetic family tree – one that follows the all-female line on the maternal side (through mitochondrial DNA) and another the all-male line on the paternal side (through the Y chromosome).

Not all DNA is created equal, however: males have both mitochondrial DNA AND a Y chromosome, so they can trace both their maternal and paternal ancestry. Females, who have mitochondrial DNA but no Y chromosome, can trace only their maternal ancestry.

Read more at http://blog.23andme.com/23andme-and-you/whose-y-to-use-paternal-ancestry-for-ladies/#eul8eeCFdTik2mM8.99

=====================================
I think the whole idea is rad, but I would rather get whole genome sequencing, which is much more expensive and starts at around $1000.00.

For me, the ancestry would be a curiosity thing, but I would be more interested in my own genome and how it affects me personally. BUT I am not too sure about how useful even that would be, and soon I will be 64, whatever health habits I should have changed are likely now too late to do anything about.

So just not curious enough to spend over $1000, or in the case of 23andme, $200.
 Maleman999
Joined: 2/14/2010
Msg: 58
So You Took An Ancestry DNA Test, Now What?
Posted: 3/2/2016 10:26:02 AM
I would take any business that claims they can accurately trace your family tree hundreds of years back with a grain of salt. First of all, how do you verify the accuracy of the list of names given, versus a list of random names and birth dates that could be bogus? Are you sure they have the right John or Joan Smith that's listed in the tree? I would imagine the first thing that you would be asked when using the service is to give every detail that you know about your family tree. After that, you're relying strictly on what they tell you to be accurate.

Secondly, the list of names is based on the assumption that if a couple had kids, there was never any hanky panky and the kids were actually the bio kids of the couple listed. There was a time when having kids out of wedlock was a big no-no, and the names of the b*stard children from way back when might not be so readily available. Plus there's the assumption that nobody ever had a secret affair-or at least never had an affair that resulted in children being born. If an affair was kept hush-hush, it's unlikely that any children as a result of an affair would become public record-or at least without the real name of the bio dad. If a guy with multiple kids with multiple women was a big shot, chances are the names of the offspring might magically disappear from record-especially at a time when all records were hand written on paper or typed out on a typewriter and kept in binders, and pages could mysteriously go missing.
 2ufo
Joined: 2/28/2015
Msg: 59
So You Took An Ancestry DNA Test, Now What?
Posted: 3/2/2016 7:57:27 PM
NG -

Not all DNA is created equal, however: males have both mitochondrial DNA AND a Y chromosome, so they can trace both their maternal and paternal ancestry. Females, who have mitochondrial DNA but no Y chromosome, can trace only their maternal ancestry.


Ok, men get their own Y-DNA traced as well as their mDNA which comes from their mother. It gives them two branches to a woman's one which still leaves out a lot of 'family history'.
 bucsgirl
Joined: 5/13/2006
Msg: 60
view profile
History
So You Took An Ancestry DNA Test, Now What?
Posted: 3/3/2016 12:20:24 PM
Information that is obtained just for the sake of it is what I consider trivia. Facts/knowledge that is not for a purpose may just be to satisfy a curiosity. I don't see any harm in it, depending on how you use (or don't) the information.
 vlad dracul
Joined: 4/30/2009
Msg: 61
view profile
History
So You Took An Ancestry DNA Test, Now What?
Posted: 3/3/2016 1:14:31 PM
"While reading about the Holocaust, I read somewhere that in his book Mein Kampf, Hitler discusses the notion that people who were racially inferior had no right to live.
http://www.ushmm.org/outreach/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007679

"Hitler spread his beliefs in racial "purity" and in the superiority of the "Germanic race"—what he called an Aryan "master race." He pronounced that his race must remain pure in order to one day take over the world. For Hitler, the ideal "Aryan" was blond, blue-eyed, and tall.""


OP you should read about the fabian society and the adherents of darwinism and eugenics. The nazis just did not pluck their theory from thin air. The great and the good who followed darwins theory of evolution also believed in the euthanisation of the poor and infirm.

In fact george bernard shaw the playwrite called for chambers where the feeble minded could be humanely put to sleep to stop them from breeding.

"Eugenics had been the brainchild of Charles Darwin’s cousin Francis Galton, and was developed in response to Darwin’s theory of natural selection. It was taken up as a programme of political action by Darwin’s son Leonard. The eugenicists aimed to replace natural selection with a planned and deliberate selection. They were alarmed by the fact that the poorest in society bred faster than the middle class, forecasting that this trend would lead to a spiral of degeneration in the gene pool.

Even for George Bernard Shaw, ‘the only fundamental and possible Socialism’ was ‘the socialisation of the selective breeding of Man’.

In the years leading up to the first world war Leonard Darwin set about lobbying the government to act. He wanted to set up flying squads of scientists, armed with powers of arrest over the poor, to tour the country weeding out the ‘unfit’. Those who were found wanting by these tribunals were to be segregated in special colonies or sterilised. One politician who supported such draconian measures in parliament was the Labour MP Will Crooks, who described the targets of the eugenics campaign as ‘like human vermin’ who ‘crawl about doing absolutely nothing, except polluting and corrupting everything they touch’. Crooks was perhaps only outdone in his vehement contempt for what we now call the ‘underclass’ by Shaw, who believed that they had ‘no business to be alive’ and speculated at a meeting of the Eugenics Society about the need to use a ‘lethal chamber’ to solve the problem.

Another Fabian eugenicist, the writer H.G. Wells, vented his frustration and indignation in a direct address to the working class. ‘We cannot go on giving you health, freedom, enlargement, limitless wealth, if all our gifts to you are to be swamped by an indiscriminate torrent of progeny,’ he complained, ‘…and we cannot make the social life and the world-peace we are determined to make, with the ill-bred, ill-trained swarms of inferior citizens that you inflict upon us.’
http://www.spectator.co.uk/2009/11/how-eugenics-poisoned-the-welfare-state/
So You Took An Ancestry DNA Test, Now What?
Posted: 3/3/2016 4:39:23 PM
^

My initial impulse is to think that the poor don't necessarily correlate with inferior genes, and that you wouldn't have much of a positive effect on the general gene pool if you didn't let low IQ people reproduce. And that therefore it wouldn't make sense to think that we'd have a spiral of degeneration in the gene pool just because the poor reproduced. My initial impulse is to think that high-IQ people don't automatically have high-IQ children, and that low-IQ people don't automatically have low-IQ children...not solely as a result of the genes, that is. Being poor or wealthy, and being intelligent or not, have some influence upon each other indirectly, I'm sure, but I would point out that they are two different things and indicators/results of two different things. But upon second thought, I wonder if there've been any studies or any real evidence for what links and influences there are.

And then we must notice the inconsistency and vagueness of terms in the above...feeble minded, poor, infirm, unfit, inferior. Inconsistent as it relates to these flawed ideas about reproduction, intelligence, and social status/financial standing...and trying to identify who is and isn't feeble minded, poor, infirm, unfit, and inferior according to these indicators.

We must clarify whether we're talking about biologically dictated intelligence, or that which is the result of opportunity and education, respect and equality.

Looking down on the poor and wanting to rid the world of them, is only ascending that financial ladder and then wanting to delete everyone who didn't happen to get up that ladder. Nothing more. Not necessarily anything to do with intelligence. And we all should know by now that ascendance does not often indicate intelligence or good character (adding 'character' here, to contrast the vague use of the term 'inferior'), and is not often a result of. Or rather, to counter the extent to which it can and has...non-ascendance does not often indicate/be a result of non-intelligence nor lack of character. We also should all know by now that intelligence is greatly affected by education, and financial status by opportunity. I believe that genes/biology definitely influence one's intellectual potential, but I do suspect that there aren't very significant differences in different people's intellectual potentials, in a broad-stroke manner of speaking, and that the most effect is derived by opportunity and education. However, again, I also wonder if there are any real scientific elucidations on this matter - we've built a world wherein it's easy to function well and have the appearance of having a certain level of 'sense'...there may in fact be subtle nuances (not immediately obvious) to a person's behavioral disposition which are genetically derived that could indicate consequential differences between one person's intelligence and another's.

Otherwise, on topic, I'd be less interested in finding out about my ancestry, and more interested in having my own personal DNA deciphered and translated, and learn more about my own unique physiology that way. Physiological trends in my ancestral history would lend a hand to that, but my interest lies in that versus just knowing who my great great grand-folks were.
Show ALL Forums  > Off Topic  > So You Took An Ancestry DNA Test, Now What?