Plentyoffish dating forums are a place to meet singles and get dating advice or share dating experiences etc. Hopefully you will all have fun meeting singles and try out this online dating thing... Remember that we are the largest free online dating service, so you will never have to pay a dime to meet your soulmate.
     
Show ALL Forums  > UK forums  > Brexit? A coup de grace?      Home login  
 AUTHOR
 UKBunny
Joined: 8/10/2018
Msg: 702
view profile
History
Brexit? A coup de grace?Page 29 of 30    (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30)
Oh how we laughed.......

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-46714984

No, you reallly couldn't make it up..........

 vlad dracul
Joined: 4/30/2009
Msg: 703
view profile
History
Brexit? A coup de grace?
Posted: 1/3/2019 10:35:00 AM
Brexit. Dontcha just love it? Hysterical snowflakes crying. Our corrupt politicians showing they only care about what THEY want. The lying press, especially the grauniad going back on suicide watch.

And all because of little old us. I felt no end of a feeling of schadenfreude when i read this below.

Now if only we had someone with the balls who would tell the gulag they are getting NO 40 billion £'s that would be a fitting end..............



"The Government will seek hundreds of millions of euro in special aid from Brussels if the UK crashes out of the EU without a deal.

Dublin has already alerted the EU Commission that it will be lobbying for emergency aid to cope with the fallout to Irish trade, particularly for the beef, dairy and fishing sectors.

With Westminster deadlocked, fears are growing that Britain will exit the EU in just 12 weeks’ time without a deal.

However, it also comes at a time when Ireland is under increasing pressure from key EU member states, such as France and Germany, to increase taxes on multinational high-tech companies in Ireland."

https://www.independent.ie/business/farming/news/farming-news/emergency-eu-aid-for-farmers-to-be-sought-for-brexit-fallout-37677649.html
 Justanotherchap
Joined: 12/4/2013
Msg: 704
view profile
History
Brexit? A coup de grace?
Posted: 1/4/2019 2:37:36 AM
Vlad, yes we could do as that arse Boris Johnson said and tell them t go whistle for the money. However, they are trading partners and they can retaliate pretty easily by simply delaying imports for 48 hours or so. The reality is that we are in an interlocked world with rules. if we simply crash out then yes, we can start to import cheaper beef from South America as it says in the article but that comes with lower standards to (remember Mad Cow Disease?).

I agree though that much of this is just alarmist hogwash. But I would remind you that this was just an internal Tory party problem made into something much worse. You may have voted for a crash out of the EU scenario but talking to other people who voted out, this was not the deal they wanted nor voted for.
 Theydidnotfixit
Joined: 8/19/2018
Msg: 705
view profile
History
Brexit? A coup de grace?
Posted: 1/4/2019 6:02:40 AM
We didn't vote for a deal we voted for a decisive break from a globalist stab at the fourth Reich. We also run a trade deficit with this "club" (asylum) Which subtracts from our growth not adds to it.
Thanks.
 vlad dracul
Joined: 4/30/2009
Msg: 706
view profile
History
Brexit? A coup de grace?
Posted: 1/4/2019 6:27:39 AM
Chapster

"But I would remind you that this was just an internal Tory party problem made into something much worse. You may have voted for a crash out of the EU scenario but talking to other people who voted out, this was not the deal they wanted nor voted for."

Well the way the result came in i think it was more than just internal tory fighting. Looking at the areas in englandshire that were heavy brexit areas i think tories were rather rare.

We voted to leave the eu. All that nonsense about 'peoples vote' is galling. They never gave a toss about us before.

Citizens never voted to allow millions of cheap exploitable labour. They never voted to see the industries in their areas destroyed by globalism. They never voted for unelected commissars ruling over them from the gulag.

Yep call me dave cameron and his entitled dafties thought they would never lose the vote. They panicked about ukip. Yet ukip done more damage to london labour than they did to the tories.

Nobody knows what the outcome will be. You know my view on it.

But the gulag needed a bloody nose. Yet what was the vile merkels crimbo message? More globalism. Citizens sitting in some rat hole infested housings schemes around the nation HAVE nothing to lose. Life couldn't get any worse.

That odious wee twat sadiq khan in londonistan. "London voted remain, so we must do what london wants". More citizens voted brexit in londonistan than voted for that div.

And another thing the wailing remainers forget. The sheer joy and schadenfreude the rest of the nation is getting because poor lononistan is not getting it's own way.

Well london remain dafties. Welcome to the world the rest of us live in.
 UKBunny
Joined: 8/10/2018
Msg: 707
view profile
History
Brexit? A coup de grace?
Posted: 1/4/2019 12:23:45 PM
(remember Mad Cow Disease?)

I seem to recall that, at the time, this mess was blamed on our Estrn Ero-bretheren?

In the fullness of time, the UK will survive

(we beat the Bosch y'now and the bluddy Luftwafer - Johnny Foreigners all)

Colonel vice-chair Fitzmourice
Basingtoke UDI.

 Chastirin
Joined: 10/3/2018
Msg: 708
view profile
History
Brexit? A coup de grace?
Posted: 1/4/2019 3:13:54 PM
Mad cow disease - we were feeding our herbivorous cattle infected meat by-products. Wherever the feed came from, it was asking for trouble really.
 Justanotherchap
Joined: 12/4/2013
Msg: 709
view profile
History
Brexit? A coup de grace?
Posted: 1/5/2019 3:13:37 AM
Indeed, but tht was my point. We can get trade deals with all sorts of countries but it may mean lowering standards I know there's a lot of propaganda about but in the US they do wash chickens in chlorine which allows them to use meat which we would condemn. I am trying to point out that this process is far from simple. I did not want to join the EU, EC yes, EU no. But we have to recognise that we have some almost 50 years of intertwining and regulation to undo much of which most of us are not aware of.

The Irish are panicking becuase they've just discovered that one third of the catch by Irish boats is in UK waters. They are also finding that the EU countries are not happy with the very low almost non existent tax they are charging large international companies. I'm not sure why that is confined to the Irish when Luxembourg is surely the biggest aider and abetter of tax dodgers?
 vlad dracul
Joined: 4/30/2009
Msg: 710
view profile
History
Brexit? A coup de grace?
Posted: 1/5/2019 7:12:45 AM
There once was a great big huge nail on the brexit thread. Then our very own Chapster hit it right on the head with a bloody big hammer...............

"I did not want to join the EU, EC yes, EU no."

And then............

"But we have to recognise that we have some almost 50 years of intertwining and regulation to undo much of which most of us are not aware of."

That be true. But why does it need to change after brexit? Same with the european arrest warrant. And the funny people who monitor would be terrorists (but not very well) around the gulag nations.

The checks are in place. Why do they need to change? If you have a local boozer you use all the time. They have the house rules. If you then get a change of owner the same house rules apply. What makes it so difficult then?

As for luxembourg. Is that no where jean claude balls comes from? Says it all.

Imagine malta slapping us about like dafties and having a say on our lives.

I have siberian death flu. Woe is me.
 Justanotherchap
Joined: 12/4/2013
Msg: 711
view profile
History
Brexit? A coup de grace?
Posted: 1/5/2019 8:42:50 AM
Simplistic again I know but who took us into the EEC without asking the proletariat? Heath.

Who took us into the EU without asking the proletariat (despite saying he would)? Major.

Who finally had the balls to ask us about Europe despite wanting a different outcome? Cameron.

Who has screwed up the negotiations in the worst possible way? May.

Anyone got the connection yet?
 woz1968
Joined: 10/31/2018
Msg: 712
view profile
History
Brexit? A coup de grace?
Posted: 1/5/2019 2:03:06 PM
I’ve said countless times on here we joined a trade club that turned into a quasi state. Can you imagine signing up for Costco and it turned out it wanted to rule us?
 try1more
Joined: 12/16/2007
Msg: 713
view profile
History
Brexit? A coup de grace?
Posted: 1/5/2019 5:48:52 PM
who the hell cares what anyone says/claims.
brexit served it's purpose. the eu is dead.
the un, world bank and who all have their cards marked.
not sure about nato not really looked that hard time will tell.
interesting times!
 Theydidnotfixit
Joined: 8/19/2018
Msg: 714
view profile
History
Brexit? A coup de grace?
Posted: 1/6/2019 6:26:24 AM
The Tories ??....


"Europe's nations should be guided towards the superstate without the people understanding what is happening. This is to be accomplished by successive steps each disguised as having an economic purpose but which eventually will Irreversibly lead to federation". 

Jean Monet 1952

It was always about one state , come on keep up. A centralised workers paradise, it's what the CIA and Barrack wanted if not Donald Trump .

Some remainers think surrendering British democracy for the European straitjacket is a way to keep Britain influential in the world. But for me, at best, it will be run in the interests of Germany and because it's a terrible idea (empire within empire) unhappiness will ensue and self described people of good sense and great reason will wonder why is this splendid idea not working. Consent lovelies.

Leaving doesn't involve a deal . What we need are people less concerned with a deal and more concerned with our nation's problems. And a "fully and comprehensive" ****ing deal is trivia.

The Dow Jones was up 750 points on Friday. Jay Powell in Atlanta with Ben and Janet made all the
right enabling noises and with a slew of good news, that he knew was coming, the market went whoosh.

So what Jay said in simple speak was some sort of assurance that he would turn the bath tap on if need be and replace the plug better if that's not quite in the plug hole, that is if the bathwater level began to drop ( which it is ). Not quite what he was saying a few weeks ago but we will let that go because at least he acknowledges that the taps are not on and there are potentially leakage issues.

And what I'm saying is that he can't draw a bath. It's riddled with an increasing amount of 6mm holes and water gushing out through both taps (in the form of say QE and UBI ~universal basic income ) is what is really needed so that your monetary scheme, Jay, can continue with less haste on its stately slow descent into penury, war and the gates of hell.

Any questions ?

Yeah, I love x factor , take no interest in the machinations of our great statesmen and women but I am now really worried that Angela or Theresa Will leave me without a hot bath ? Sharon x.Really simple answer bill please.

Answer. .
Au and Ag equals hot baths.
 Theydidnotfixit
Joined: 8/19/2018
Msg: 715
view profile
History
Brexit? A coup de grace?
Posted: 1/6/2019 7:42:11 AM
No brexit stuff in France but it sure seems troubled. I'm wondering how, when they have this great remaining deal, they seem so unhappy. They have no Tory party either. President Moron only has an approval rating of 25%. For god's sake he's changed his policies, what more can the granny grabbing, investment banker do. He's going to go into the red a little bit more. Don't know yet what Germany or Italy will say about that.

And still every weekend Paris keeps getting sacked. All classes hate him. Apparently he suggests it's the fault of a country with a yearly income smaller than Spain's. Yeah Russia. I don't know about that.

I personally think we haven't as much money as we would all wish for in our lovely global world. Wealth creation has been sidelined by fantasy. And to make it look to remainers or servile governmental loving toadies that we do, we assure people through derivatives that we do. And hope that not too many people show up at once. Unfortunarely as we get deeper and deeper into this way of life the chances get higher and higher that they will and then people
will get very angry. Then we'll all say, remember the old days when we were led to believe by our betters a trade deal was of huge import.

God, how were we led to think in such binary terms. Surely not by our bankers' newspapers and politicians, for don't they heed our cries first.
 Justanotherchap
Joined: 12/4/2013
Msg: 716
view profile
History
Brexit? A coup de grace?
Posted: 1/8/2019 5:18:04 AM
I wish I could write this well..................

Finally we have a confirmed use for Chris Grayling. He is the government’s secret weapon to make even the most incompetent and second-rate of ministers feel good about themselves. Not content with having wasted the best part of £14m on the government’s first-ever roll-on, roll-off pizza delivery service – all toppings guaranteed to be ferry free, the transport secretary has now spent more than £50K on failing to organise a lorry jam in Kent.

If the aim has been to make clear to the EU that the country is willing to spend any amount of money to prove we are totally unprepared for a no-deal Brexit, it is job done. Failing Grayling wears his hopelessness as a badge of honour. A man who lives and breathes the Samuel Beckett maxim: “Try again. Fail again. Fail better.” An inspiration to the mediocre that complete catatonia is within their grasp. Even without the use of performance decreasing drugs.

The Brexit secretary certainly appeared immensely grateful to Grayling, as he was called to the dispatch box to answer an urgent question on what progress the government had made in its renegotiation of the withdrawal agreement since it pulled the vote several weeks before Christmas. Stephen Barclay had previously never dared to dream of being anything more than the nonentities’ nonentity and finding himself in the cabinet has prompted an identity crisis. He now affects the swagger of a somebody but has the personality and intelligence of a nobody.

Still, knowing next to nothing about anything is no real disadvantage when it comes to the Brexit negotiations as no one else in government has a clue either, so Barclay was free to make things up as he went along. There had been some progress and there again there hadn’t been some progress, he said gnomically, while repeatedly reassuring himself under his breath that at least he wasn’t Failing Grayling. There might be some news by Wednesday and if there wasn’t, then there might be by a following Wednesday. “I’m not Chris Grayling, I’m not Chris Grayling,” he mumbled, dying on his feet.

Jeremy Corbyn was more relaxed about Barclay not being Grayling. His fury was directed at Barclay not being Theresa May. The Labour leader had directed his question at the prime minister and it was a dereliction of duty she had sent a stand-in instead. It’s a sign of the general levels of Brexit madness that Corbyn believed he had lost out by not getting May’s version of events. No one has ever come away better informed about anything after 90 minutes in the company of the prime minister.

Apart from being angry about May’s absence, Corbyn wasn’t quite sure what he was actually angry about. All he knew for certain was that he was definitely angry. He shouted a bit, stumbled over his script – it was his first day back since Christmas so a little rustiness was to be expected – and generally demanded levels of clarity that were well beyond anything he could offer himself. The Labour leader might even have been taking lessons off Grayling.


What followed was an exercise in futility. Sensibly, no members of the DUP even bothered to turn up. With just 81 days till Brexit, parliament is still quite happy to waste its own and the country’s time. Barclay managed to both confirm that the prime minister would and wouldn’t present her new legal agreement before the debate restarted on Wednesday and that the vote would and wouldn’t definitely go ahead next week.

Not that anyone was listening. Or cared. Everyone who had always promised to vote against the deal anyway, merely confirmed they would do so regardless of what May said or did. “We have no plan,” wailed Labour’s Barry Sheerman. “We have no purpose.” He wailed for all of us. Though quite why it has taken him so long to realise this is a mystery.
 UKBunny
Joined: 8/10/2018
Msg: 717
view profile
History
Brexit? A coup de grace?
Posted: 1/8/2019 10:33:31 AM
At last, having spent the weekend at her personal five-star hotel in the Chilterns,
St Tereasa the Maybot emerges triumphant, clutching (wait for it) A FIVE YEAR PLAN (for the NHS)
This was the same sort of shite that Labour used to trot out in the Sixties.
Corbyn will love it.
Anyone else this side of Westminster can be heard sobbing gently, head in hands.

HOW MUCH DO WE PAY THESE LIARS & FANTASISTS? ? ?

 vlad dracul
Joined: 4/30/2009
Msg: 718
view profile
History
Brexit? A coup de grace?
Posted: 1/8/2019 11:53:42 AM
No deal brexit. It has to be.

Anyway. This wailing about the traitor soubray being shouted at. It can't be pleasant being insulted and shouted at. But why is it just now and the traitor soubray being shouted at is such a big deal?

I seem to remember nigel farage being constantly harassed and his family being abused and westmonster was fairly quiet. As were the tame press.

I mind after the murder of jo cox. The vast majority of normal people were appalled. I also mind asking big jo spart if he condemned the brighton bomb. The sound of silence.

Brexit has just been the catalyst to the anger that has been bubbling away. I also think soubray being such a vile liar deserves the abuse she gets.

The same mugs who delighted in saying brexiteers were thick, stupid, racist, xenophobic add insults as required are now trying to get us onside with a 'peoples vote'.

Now the insults are coming the other way and they do not like it at all. These twats unleashed the hatred and bile right from when the referendum was announced.

I notice in germany an AfD mep or mp has been savagely beaten and hospitalised. Ill bet a penny to a pound the remain arseholes will not be to concerned though. Depends who's politician gets attacked eh?
 RoxyMoronic
Joined: 6/7/2016
Msg: 719
Brexit? A coup de grace?
Posted: 1/8/2019 1:13:55 PM
To be fair....posting a tweet or writing a letter/tv interview doesn’t take much concern either.
It’s very easy to fake revulsion with just minimal effort.

Looking forward to coming out the other side of brexit....are we gonna make it!
 Justanotherchap
Joined: 12/4/2013
Msg: 720
view profile
History
Brexit? A coup de grace?
Posted: 1/10/2019 1:47:58 AM
I see that Theresa is now asking for help from Labour MPs and is prepared to listen to John Mann's plan to strengthen workers rights.

Meanwhile Corbyn is saying the only way to resolve this is a general election. When we don't know what your plans would be Jeremy I really don't see what you think could be resolved, it would be just like rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic.

Over in other news. Jaguar Land Rover are planning to lose 5000 jobs in the UK apparently it is all Brexit's fault.

It has nothing to do with the fact that 90% of their cars are diesel and that subject was and is being supremely badly handled by this government meaning that everyone is running scared of buying a new diesel car.

Nor is it the fault of the Chinese where JLR's sales have fallen by 50%.

Nor is it the fault of JLR (and the EU) opening a new factory in Slovakia (where labour is cheaper) with 4000 new jobs there.

Nope - just Brexit.
 vlad dracul
Joined: 4/30/2009
Msg: 721
view profile
History
Brexit? A coup de grace?
Posted: 1/11/2019 2:22:14 PM
There really is no end to the greed enjoyed by the gulag commissars..................


"European Parliament is failing on transparency
Voters have to be reassured MEPs are being held accountable.

By Heidi Hautala

When it comes to transparency, the European Parliament’s motto has become: Do as I say, not as I do.

As a relatively new member of the European Parliament Bureau — where decisions regarding the Parliament’s administration and budget are made — I have experienced first hand how its members are quietly burying essential transparency reforms behind closed doors.

The result is bad for European democracy and puts our future at risk.

Europe’s democracies rely on open and transparent decision-making as much as they rely on the rule of law and the respect of core values.

If we want to maintain our slipping credibility with voters ahead of the parliamentary election in May, we have to reassure them that politicians are being held to account — and that we are respecting our own rules.

With European democratic values already under assault in various parts of the bloc, the Parliament urgently needs to set a better example.

The Parliament Bureau, for example, has blocked reforms that would ensure MEPs must report on how they spend their so-called General Expenditure Allowance of around €4,400 a month — public money that is intended to cover office management costs and other expenses, and which MEPs receive as a lump sum every month, with no obligation to track how it is put to use.

Bureau members justify their position by insisting, again and again, that a member of the European Parliament is entitled to a “free mandate” — meaning he or she is able to act independently from outside pressure. They claim extra checks on their activities and spending would hamper their ability to perform their duties.

The message Parliament is sending EU citizens is clear: We expect transparency and accountability from everyone else, but refuse to be bound by the same rules.

Under pressure from heightened media scrutiny, Parliament President Antonio Tajani vowed to push for clearer rules. But when it came time to vote on the new measures, the Bureau’s majority, eight vice presidents, acting with Tajani’s blessing, voted them down. Once again, they cited the freedom of MEPs’ mandate.

The Bureau’s reluctance to change the rules goes against the will of most MEPs, a majority of whom have voted on several occasions for greater transparency when it comes to the allowance they receive.

The only real step the Bureau took was to stipulate the allowance be paid into a separate bank account. Other proposed changes — such as requiring MEPs to keep receipts and publishing annual overviews of spending — were voted down. The majority of Bureau members claimed voluntary transparency measures are enough.

Headlines around the EU summed up the disbelief and disappointment over this decision. MEPs refuse transparency, French newspapers wrote. Austrian media described the vote as a gift to EU-haters. Buy yourself a mirror, the Belgians advised.

The Parliament is also failing to make headway on its proposal for a mandatory transparency register for lobbyists.

The proposed lobby register would be a simple way to keep track of MEPs’ meetings with lobbyists. The principle is straightforward, and hard to dispute: No registration, no meeting. And yet here too, the Parliament Bureau resists any meaningful changes and continues to either postpone a decision on the proposal or propose voluntary measures instead.

If MEPs’ free mandate guarantees that they can vote and speak independently from any outside instructions, whether from their voters or their parties, wouldn’t the principle be reinforced, rather than impaired, by a mandatory lobby register? Several legal experts have made a convincing case as to why it would.

The Parliament’s resistance to transparency has also affected the #MeToo movement that briefly saw a flurry of claims of sexual harassment in the institution. On paper, the Parliament follows a zero-tolerance approach toward any form of harassment.

But here too, the Bureau has undermined efforts to introduce greater accountability.

A majority of MEPs voted for compulsory training for all staff and for members of Parliament. And yet, the Bureau made training for MEPs voluntary, rather than mandatory. The result? Out of a total of 751 MEPs, only 19 reportedly showed up to the first sessions.

The message Parliament is sending EU citizens is clear: We expect transparency and accountability from everyone else, but refuse to be bound by the same rules.

With European democratic values already under assault in various parts of the bloc, the Parliament urgently needs to set a better example — not least of all to maintain its credibility in the eyes of EU citizens.

This eighth Parliament will not be remembered as the one that improved transparency. Let’s hope the next one does a better job.

Heidi Hautala is a Finnish MEP and a vice president of the European Parliament."

https://www.politico.eu/article/eu-parliament-is-failing-on-transparency-public-spending-rules/
 Justanotherchap
Joined: 12/4/2013
Msg: 722
view profile
History
Brexit? A coup de grace?
Posted: 1/16/2019 1:52:18 AM
Now what?

That is historically the largest defeat by a sitting government by a long margin. Essentially two thirds of the parliament voted against May. (202 for - 432 against) I think the previous largest one was by 100 votes and that was wy back in the 1920s.

Corbyn is pushing for a general election but as a supporter of anyone getting rid of May, what bloody difference would it make? The EU are not about to be pushed around and Corbyn's only idea seems to be to try to do that.

So the options are that May survives a confidence vote, in which case she is going to do precisely what? The EU will extend the article 50 but only for a political process and not to reopen negotiations.

So effectively we are right back to where we always were, IMHO as JV would have said, 1) stay in the EU 2) accept the current deal 3) crash out on WTO terms
 woz1968
Joined: 10/31/2018
Msg: 723
view profile
History
Brexit? A coup de grace?
Posted: 1/16/2019 6:50:47 AM
I had four salmon fillets for dinner last night, that was historically the most salmon fillets i've eaten in one sitting.

My point is none of it matters. The sun will still come up in the morning, there will be work to do, food on the shelves and cold beers in the summer.

If i had any opinion on this shyte it would be fcuk the EU and leave without a deal. We'll live.


Goal!
 vlad dracul
Joined: 4/30/2009
Msg: 724
view profile
History
Brexit? A coup de grace?
Posted: 1/20/2019 10:27:00 PM
I know most of the posters on here are brexiteers and are aware that the mass influx of cheap exploitable labour drives down wages. But just for any lurkers who still deny that foreign labour is exploited this might just make you think that we have a point...........


"Why freedom of movement is causing divisions – across Europe

Freedom of movement for EU workers has been front and centre in the Brexit debate. Fear of foreign workers undercutting the wages and working conditions of locals helped to fuel the leave campaign.

But while attitudes to migrant workers in Brexit Britain are often seen as a case apart, free movement of people evokes hostility in other EU countries too.

Especially troubling is the exploitation of “posted workers”, employees from one EU state who are temporarily seconded by their employer (sometimes based in a third EU country) to carry out a service elsewhere in the EU, while remaining tied to the social security system of their country of origin.

Out-of-date EU regulation has allowed the consistent undercutting of wages and working conditions, and the exploitation of these foreign nationals.

EU rules on posted workers were originally intended to strengthen the rights of EU citizens moving from one member state to another. The assumption was that highly skilled workers would provide short-term expertise where it was needed.

But European labour markets today look radically different from when this legislation emerged in the 1990s. Large parts of the population are in temporary, short-term and insecure employment contracts. Moreover, the 28 member states now have radically different welfare states and wage levels.

It is in this context that “posting” turned into a mechanism that subcontractors based in the lower-wage countries began exploiting to offer cheaper services abroad.

Setting up scaffolding or laying the floor at a construction site, for example, are services that can be offered more cheaply if subcontractors pay the national insurance contributions of workers in their country of origin.

Employers can then make further savings by keeping the wages and bonuses of posted workers lower than those of local workers.

For example, at the Severn power plant construction site in Uskmouth, the GMB trade union exposed how posted workers from Poland received incorrect overtime payments, were not granted due annual leave, and faced illegal deductions for lodging.

As I have detailed in my recent book, Workers Without Borders, there are several reasons why it is easier for employers to exploit posted workers than even temporary agency workers. For a start they are sent abroad for a limited period and are not automatically entitled to equal treatment with nationals.

They feel detached from the country and the trade unions where the job is carried out, and will seek to claim their rights only in the most dire cases. Because of the temporary nature of the work, they often endure mistreatment in order to earn a target wage before moving on to another employment opportunity.

Third, labour inspection in the UK, as in other EU countries, cannot adequately enforce the rights of posted workers because subcontractors posting workers abroad can easily de- and re-register from one country to the next.

Though these workers are performing vital tasks in fields such as construction, nursing and transport, they do not enjoy the same rights and benefits as others doing the same jobs.

At the same time, they face hostility owing to their willingness to work for lower wages and with fewer social rights, primarily along east-west and south-north axes, since wages are higher in northern and western Europe.
One of the biggest receiving countries is Germany, where foreign workers are especially in demand in the construction industry.

For instance, a posted Polish construction worker on a German building site does not enjoy the same rights as German or even Polish colleagues working for a German subcontractor, because the employment relationship is partially regulated from Poland.

Thus, popular, derogatory stereotypes of the “Polish plumber” might well have emerged not because of individual tradespeople offering cheaper services; but because EU regulation does not adequately protect EU citizens who move for work to another country.

My research shows that, in today’s economy, many posted workers are forced to accept just about any job, with no permanent employment; do not get their minimum rights enforced in the host state; and are afraid to voice their rights in fear of employer retaliation and unemployment.

This is a particularly distressing paradox in the modern European welfare states: how can a country like Germany, with such powerful employers’ associations and trade unions, allow for a precarious labour market segment composed of EU migrants?

An overlooked piece of the puzzle is the re-regulatory politics at the workplace level. The debate around Brexit and the rise of nationalism in the EU is closely connected to populist discourse about, unsurprisingly, broad movements and vague numbers of workers.

Political divisions among EU states over posted workers break along the aforementioned east-west axis. Eastern European states lobby for deregulation, while western states support stricter regulations. Proposed new EU rules aim to promote de facto equal treatment between local and posted workers.

A new directive would ensure that posted workers receive the same pay and conditions as local staff. But Hungary and Poland are challenging the reform in the European court of justice and trying to get the new directive annulled.

These actions have again opened up intense political debate, and threaten to curtail the rights of more than 2 million EU workers posted abroad.

Countries such as France, Germany and the Netherlands favour the new directive because they are under the impression that these new rules will stop service companies from employing foreign EU workers below the local minimum wage. Hungary and Poland want to preserve their competitive advantage in the EU labour market

While Hungary and Poland still argue for the right of their workers to move freely within the EU, increasingly hostile anti-immigrant sentiment can be found in both countries. Support for freedom of movement may well wane if it is not as profitable to Hungarian or Polish citizens.

Brexit will certainly complicate how freedom of movement of workers and services will be regulated and practised in the EU. Regardless, the issue of posted work has already revealed significant tensions.

• Ines Wagner is senior researcher at the Norwegian Institute for Social Research, and the author of Workers Without Borders: Posted Work and Precarity in the EU

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/jan/16/freedom-movement-euroep-foreign-posted-workers-eu

Still i suppose remainers can always claim the grauniad is a purveyor of fake news.
 vlad dracul
Joined: 4/30/2009
Msg: 725
view profile
History
Brexit? A coup de grace?
Posted: 1/21/2019 10:40:15 AM
Ah good old brexit. Watching the remanic state trying every trick in the book to try and thwart democracy.

But wail the remanic state. Scotland and Northern Ireland voted remain. And for that i feel sorrow.

So brexit won by 1,269,501 votes.


But i seen someone making the point that in Scotland 1,018,322 Scots voted brexit. And in Northern Ireland 349,442 voters voted to escape the gulag.

1,018,322
+ 349,442

= 1,367,764

So basically, heroic Scottish brexiteers and our Norn Irish cousins delivered brexit.

What a great feeling having played a part in westmonster meltdown, suicide watch at the grauniad and bbc and london labour eating themselves in a civil war.

Woo hoo

So how about THAT remanic state?
 gavs321
Joined: 1/15/2019
Msg: 726
Brexit? A coup de grace?
Posted: 1/24/2019 10:31:53 AM
UK needs to worry about its native birth rates before their economy... why are the native white English people not having kids?
Show ALL Forums  > UK forums  > Brexit? A coup de grace?