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 AUTHOR
 billybonds
Joined: 8/8/2014
Msg: 78
whats the daftest thing you have done when drunkPage 3 of 20    (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20)
Like a ferret..


Oh dear so slow still group hug let's all track back to the centre circle....


Sir Trevor for me vvvv
 10ky
Joined: 11/15/2012
Msg: 79
whats the daftest thing you have done when drunk
Posted: 12/19/2017 7:24:29 AM
-chapo/roxster

What's this rubbish about folk? Goal? Like? La mano de Dios? :D

PS: I totally love Diego. Need to say that.



In order to maintain the highest quality forums you are restricted to having no more then 2 of the last 10 posts on a thread. Since 2 of the last 10 posts are yours you can not post to this thread.
 RoxyMoronic
Joined: 6/7/2016
Msg: 81
whats the daftest thing you have done when drunk
Posted: 12/19/2017 7:40:50 AM
Andy Gray for me.

Once when drunk I got into a crazy daft argument with a bunch of strangers on an internet forum.....

.....just kidding......how stupid do you think I am......doesn’t require an answer :)
 scareymush
Joined: 8/9/2011
Msg: 82
whats the daftest thing you have done when drunk
Posted: 12/19/2017 7:48:09 AM
Poilet, Why do you incessantly repeat yourself?

I'm not answering accusations I've already answered or responding to 'trumped up charges' by your weird little friend.

Have you heard the definition of insanity? It may not be true but it seems fitting to describe your carry-on:

"The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result."

It's not going to happen that I will bend to your narrative no matter how much you harangue me or how you and your beloved persist in using me as piggy-in-the-middle in your folie à deux .

Your madness is yours to own....there's been a couple of times I've almost waivered and thought of being kind to you so you'd quit yabbering on but you're so relentless, you don't read things properly and as can be seen in this thread very clearly, you're a horrible bully, quite evil and b1tchy in fact.
 Justanotherchap
Joined: 12/4/2013
Msg: 83
view profile
History
whats the daftest thing you have done when drunk
Posted: 12/19/2017 7:54:03 AM

What's this rubbish about folk?


No idea KY - I lost the plot a long time ago. Seems to be something to do with people calling each other a triangle?

Anyway - back to the footie. Aren't Everton doing well under Sam?
 rekirked
Joined: 11/7/2017
Msg: 85
whats the daftest thing you have done when drunk
Posted: 12/19/2017 8:03:34 AM
CHAPTER I

WELL, PRINCE, so Genoa and Lucca are now
just family estates of the Buonapartes. But I
warn you, if you don't tell me that this means
war, if you still try to defend the infamies and
horrors perpetrated by that Antichrist I real-
ly believe he is Antichrist I will have nothing
more to do with you and you are no longer my
friend, no longer my 'faithful slave,' as you
call yourself! But how do you do? I see I have
frightened you sit down and tell me all the
news."

It was in July, 1805, and the speaker was the
well-known Anna Pdvlovna Sch^rer, maid of
honor and favorite of the Empress Marya Fe-
dorovna. With these words she greeted Prince
Vasili Kurdgin, a man of high rank and impor-
tance, who was the first to arrive at her recep-
tion. Anna Pdvlovna had had a cough for some
days. She was, as she said, suffering from la
grippe; grippe being then a new word in St.
Petersburg, used only by the elite.

All her invitations without exception, writ-
ten in French, and delivered by a scarlet-liver-
ied footman that morning, ran as follows:

"If you have nothing better to do, Count [or
Prince], and if the prospect of spending an
evening with a poor invalid is not too terrible,
I shall be very charmed to see you tonight be-
tween 7 and 10 Annette Sch^rer."

"Heavens! what a virulent attack!" replied
the prince, not in the least disconcerted by this
reception. He had just entered, wearing an em-
broidered court uniform, knee breeches, and
shoes, and had stars on his breast and a serene
expression on his flat face. He spoke in that
refined French in which our grandfathers not
only spoke but thought, and with the gentle,
patronizing intonation natural to a man of
importance who had grown old in society and
at court. He went up to Anna Pavlovna, kissed
her hand, presenting to her his bald, scented,
and shining head, and complacently seated
himself on the sofa.

"First of all, dear friend, tell me how you



are. Set your friend's mind at rest," said he
without altering his tone, beneath the polite-
ness and affected sympathy of which indiffer-
ence and even irony could be discerned.

"Can one be well while suffering morally?
Can one be calm in tirrfes like these if one has
any feeling?" said Anna Pdvlovna. "You are
staying the whole evening, I hope?"

"And the fete at the English ambassador's?
Today is Wednesday. I must put in an appear-
ance there," said the prince. "My daughter is
coming for me to take me there."

"I thought today's fete had been canceled.
I confess all these festivities and fireworks are
becoming wearisome."

"If they had known that you wished it, the
entertainment would have been put off," said
the prince, who, like a wound-up clock, by
force of habit said things he did not even wish
to be believed.

"Don't tease! Well, and what has been de-
cided about Novosiltsev's dispatch? You know
everything."

"What can one say about it?" replied the
prince in a cold, listless tone. "What has been
decided? They have decided that Buonaparte
has burnt his boats, and I believe that we are
ready to burn ours."

Prince Vastti always spoke languidly, like
an actor repeating a stale part. Anna Pdvlovna
Scherer on the contrary, despite her forty years,
overflowed with animation and impulsiveness.
To be an enthusiast had become her social vo-
cation and, sometimes even when she did not
feel like it, she became enthusiastic in order
not to disappoint the expectations of those
who knew her. The subdued smile which,
though it did not suit her faded features, al-
ways played round her lips expressed, as in a
spoiled child, a continual consciousness of her
charming defect, which she neither wished, nor
could, nor considered it necessary, to correct.

In the midst of a conversation on political
matters Anna Pdvlovna burst out:

"Oh, don't speak to me of Austria. Perhaps



WAR AND PEACE



I don't understand things, but Austria never
has wished, and does not wish, for war. She is
betraying us! Russia alone must save Europe.
Our gracious sovereign recognizes his high vo-
cation and will be true to it. That is the one
thing I have faith in! Our good and wonder-
ful sovereign has to perfonn the noblest role
on earth, and he is so virtuous and noble that
God will not forsake him. He will fulfill his
vocation and crush the hydra of revolution,
which has become more terrible than ever in
the person of this murderer and villain! We
alone must avenge the blood of the just one.
. . . Whom, I ask you, can we rely on? . . . Eng-
land with her commercial spirit will not and
cannot understand the Emperor Alexander's
loftiness of soul. She tias refused to evacuate
Malta. She wanted to find, and still seeks, some
secret motive in our actions. What answer did
Novosiltsev get? None. The English have not
understood and cannot understand the self-
abnegation of our Emperor who wants noth-
ing for himself, but only desires the good of
mankind. And what have they promised? Noth-
ing! And what little they have promised they
will not perform! Prussia has always declared
that Buonaparte is invincible and that all
Europe is powerless before him. . . . And I
don't believe a word that Hardenburg says,
or Haugwitz either. This famous Prussian neu-
trality is just a trap. I have faith only in God
and the lofty destiny of our adored monarch.
He will save Europe!"

She suddenly paused, smiling at her own
impetuosity.

"I think," said the prince with a smile, "that
if you had been sent instead of our dear
Wintzingerode you would have captured the
King of Prussia's consent by assault. You are
so eloquent. Will you give me a cup of tea?"

"In a moment. X propos"she added, becom-
ing calm again, "I am expecting two very in-
teresting men tonight, le Vicomte de Morte-
mart, who is connected with the Montmoren-
cys through the Rohans,oneof the best French
families. He is one of the genuine dmigrh, the
good ones. And also the Abbe* Morio. Do you
know that profound thinker? He has been re-
ceived by the Emperor. Had you heard?"

"I shall be delighted to meet them," said the
prince. "But tell me," he added with studied
carelessness as if it had only just occurred to
him, though the question he was about to ask
was the chief motive of his visit, "is it true that
the Dowager Empress wants Baron Funke to be
appointed first secretary at Vienna? The baron



by all accounts is a poor creature."

Prince Vasfli wished to obtain this post for
his son, but others were trying through the
Dowager Empress Mdrya Fedorovna to secure
it for the baron.

Anna Pdvlovna almost closed her eyes to in-
dicate that neither she nor anyone else had a
right to criticize what the Empress desired or
was pleased with.

"Baron Funke has been recommended to the
Dowager Empress by her sister," was all she
said, in a dry and mournful tone.

As she named the Empress, Anna Pdvlovna's
face suddenly assumed an expression of pro-
found and sincere devotion and respect min-
gled with sadness, and thisoccurred every time
she mentioned her illustrious patroness. She
added that Her Majesty had deigned to show
Baron Funke beaucoup d'estime, and again
her face clouded over with sadness.

The prince was silent and looked indiffer-
ent. But, with the womanly and courtierlike
quickness and tact habitual to her, Anna Pdv-
lovna wished both to rebuke him (for daring
to speak as he had done of a man recommended
to the Empress) and at the same time to con-
sole him, so she said:

"Now about your family. Do you know that
since your daughter came out everyone has
been enraptured by her? They say she is amaz-
ingly beautiful."

The prince bowed to signify his respect and
gratitude.

"I often think," she continued after a short
pause, drawing nearer to the prince and smil-
ing amiably at him as if to show that political
and social topics were ended and the time had
come for intimate conversation "I often think
how unfairly sometimes the joys of life are dis-
tributed. Why has fate given you two such
splendid children? I don't speak of Anatole,
your youngest. I don't like him," she added in
a tone admitting of no rejoinder and raising
her eyebrows. "Two such charming children.
And really you appreciate them less than any-
one, and so you don't deserve to have them."

And she smiled her ecstatic smile.

"I can't help it," said the prince. "Lavater
would have said I lack the bump of paternity."

"Don't joke; I mean to have a serious talk
with you. Do you know I am dissatisfied with
your younger son? Between ourselves" (and
her face assumed its melancholy expression),
"he was mentioned at Her Majesty's and you
were pitied. . . ."

The prince answered nothing, but she



BOOK ONE



looked at him significantly, awaiting a reply.
He frowned.

"What would you have me do?" he said at
last. "You know I did all a father could for
their education, and they have both turned
out fools. Hippolyte is at least a quiet fool, but
Anatole is an active one. That is the only dif-
ference between them." He said this smiling
in a way more natural and animated than
usual, so that the wrinkles round his mouth
very clearly revealed something unexpectedly
coarse and unpleasant.

"And why are children born to such men as
you? If you were not a father there would be
nothing I could reproach you with," said Anna
Pdvlovna, looking up pensively.

"I am your faithful slave and to you alone I
can confess that my children are the bane of
my life. It is the cross I have to bear. That is
how I explain it to myself. It can't be helped!"

He said no more, but expressed his resigna-
tion to cruel fate by a gesture. Anna Pdvlovna
meditated.

"Have you never thought of marrying your
prodigal son Anatole?" she asked. "They say
old maids have a mania for matchmaking, and
though I don't feel that weakness in myself as
yet, I know a little person who is very unhappy
with her father. She is a relation of yours,
Princess Mary Bolk6nskaya."

Prince Vasili did not reply, though, with the
quickness of memory and perception befitting
a man of the world, he indicated by a move-
ment of the head that he was considering this
information.

"Do you know," he said at last, evidently
unable to check the sad current of his thoughts,
"that Anatole is costing me forty thousand
rubles a year? And," he went on after a pause,
"what will it be in five years, if he goes on like
this?" Presently he added: "That's what we

fathers have to put up with Is this princess

of yours rich?"

"Her father is very rich and stingy. He lives
in the country. He is the well-known Prince
Bolk6nski who had to retire from the army un-
der the late Emperor, and was nicknamed 'the
King of Prussia.' He is very clever but eccen-
tric, and a bore. The poor girl is very unhappy.
She has a brother; I think you know him, he
married Lise Meinen lately. He is an aide-de-
camp of Kutiizov's and will be here tonight."

"Listen, dear Annette," said the prince, sud-
denly taking Anna Pdvlovna's hand and for
some reason drawing it downwards. "Arrange
that affair for me and I shall always be your



most devoted slave slaje with an /, as a village
elder of mine writes in his reports. She is rich
and of good family and that's all I want."

And with the familiarity and easy grace
peculiar to him, he raised the maid of honor's
hand to his lips, kissed it, and swung it to and
fro as he lay back in his armchair, looking in
another direction.

"Attendee" said Anna Pdvlovna, reflecting,
"I'll speak to Lise, young Bolk6nski's wife, this
very evening, and perhaps the thing can be
arranged. It shall be on your family's behalf
that I'll start my apprenticeship as old maid."

CHAPTER II

ANNA PAVLOVNA'S drawing room was gradually
filling. The highest Petersburg society was as-
sembled there: people differing widely in age
and character but alike in the social circle to
which they belonged. Prince Vasili's daughter,
the beautiful Hlne, came to take her father
to the ambassador's entertainment; she wore a
ball dress and her badge as maid of honor. The
youthful little Princess Bolkonskaya, known
as la femme la plus sSduisante de Pfaersbourg?
was also there. She had been married during
the previous winter, and being pregnant did
not go to any large gatherings, but only to small
receptions. Prince Vasfli's son, Hippolyte, had
come with Mortemart, whom he introduced.
The Abb6 Morio and many others had also
come.

To each new arrival Anna Pdvlovna safcl,
"You have not yet seen my aunt," or "You do
not know my aunt?" and very gravely con-
ducted him or her to a little old lady, wearing
large bows of ribbon in her cap, who had come
sailing in from another room as soon as the
guests began to arrive; and slowly turning her
eyes from the visitor to her aunt, Anna Pdv-
lovna mentioned each one's name and then
left them.

Each visitor performed the ceremony of
greeting this old aunt whom not one of them
knew, not one of them wanted to know, and
not one of them cared about; Anna Pdvlovna
observed these greetings with mournful and sol-
emn interest and silent approval. The aunt
spoke to each of them in the same words, about
their health and her own, and the health of
Her Majesty, "who, thank God, was better to-
day." And each visitor, though politeness pre-
vented his showing impatience, left the old
woman with a sense of relief at having per-
formed a vexatious duty and did not return to

1 The most fascinating woman in Petersburg.



WAR AND PEACE



her the whole evening.

The young Princess Bolk6nskaya had
brought some work in a gold-embroidered vel-
vet bag. Her pretty little upper lip, on which
a delicate dark down was just perceptible, was
too short for her teeth, but it lifted all the more
sweetly, and was especially charming when she
occasionally drew it down to meet the lower
lip. As is always the case with a thoroughly at-
tractive woman, her defectthe shortness of
her upperlip and her half-open mouth seemed
to be her own special and peculiar form of
beauty. Everyone brightened at the sight of
this pretty young woman, so soon to become
a mother, so full of life and health, and carry-
ing her burden so lightly. Old men and dull
dispirited young ones who looked at her, after
being in her company and talking to her a
litttle while, felt as if they too were becoming,
like her, full of life and health. All who talked
to her, and at each word saw her bright smile
and the constant gleam of her white teeth,
thought that they were in a specially amiable
mood that day.

The little princess went round the table
with quick, short, swaying steps, her workbag
on her arm, and gaily spreading out her dress
sat down on a sofa near the silver samovar, as
if all she was doing was a pleasure to herself
and to all around her. "I have brought my
work," said she in French, displaying her bag
and addressing all present. "Mind, Annette,
I hope you have not played a wicked trick on
me," she added, turning to her hostess. "You
wrote that it was to be quite a small reception,
and just see how badly I am dressed." And she
spread out her arms to show her short-waisted,
lace-trimmed, dainty gray dress, girdled with
a broad ribbon just below the breast.

"Soyez tranquille, Lise, you will always be
prettier than anyone else," replied Anna Pdv-
lovna.

"You know/' said the princess in the same
tone of voice and still in French, turning to a
general, "my husband is deserting me? He is
going to get himself killed. Tell me what this
wretched war is for?" she added, addressing
Prince Vasfli, and without waiting for an an-
swer she turned to speak to his daughter, the
beautiful Hlne.

"What a delightful woman this little prin-
cess isl" said Prince Vasili to Anna Pdvlovna.

One of the next arrivals was a stout, heavily
built young man with close-cropped hair, spec-
tacles, the light-colored breeches fashionable
at that time, a very high ruffle, and a brown



dress coat. This stout young man was an illegit-
imate son^of Count Bezukhov, a well-known
grandee of Catherine's time who now lay dy-
ing in Moscow. The young man had not yet
entered either the military or civil service, as
he had only just returned from abroad where
he had been educated, and this was his first ap-
pearance in society. Anna Pdvlovna greeted
him with the nod she accorded to the lowest
hierarchy in her drawing room. But in spite of
this lowest-grade greeting, a look of anxiety
and fear, as at the sight of something too large
and unsuited to the place, came over her face
when she saw Pierre enter. Though he was cer-
tainly rather bigger than the other men in the
room, her anxiety could only have reference
to the clever though shy, but observant and
natural, expression which distinguished him
from everyone else in that drawing room.

"It is very good of you, Monsieur Pierre, to
come and visit a poor invalid," said Anna Pdv-
lovna, exchanging an alarmed glance with her
aunt as she conducted him to her.

Pierre murmured something unintelligible,
and continued to look round as if in search of
something. On his way to the aunt he bowed
to the little princess with a pleased smile, as to
an intimate acquaintance.

Anna Pdvlovna's alarm was justified, for
Pierre turned away from the aunt without wait-
ing to hear her speech about Her Majesty's
health. Anna Pdvlovna in dismay detained
him with the words: "Do you know the Abbe*
Morio? He is a most interesting man."

"Yes, I have heard of his scheme for perpet-
ual peace, and it is very interesting but hardly
feasible."

"You think so?" rejoined Anna Pdvlovna in
order to say something and get away to attend
to her duties as hostess. But Pierre now com-
mitted a reverse act of impoliteness. First he
had left a lady before she had finished speak-
ing to him, and now he continued to speak to
another who wished to getaway. With his head
bent, and his big feet spread apart, he began
explaining his reasons for thinking the abbess
plan chimerical.

"We will talk of it later," said Anna Pdv-
lovna with a smile.

And having got rid of this young man who
did not know how to behave, she resumed her
duties as hostess and continued to listen and
watch, ready to help at any point where the
conversation might happen to flag. As the fore-
man of a spinning mill, when he has set the
hands to work, goes round and notices here a



BOOK ONE



spindle that has stopped or there one that
creaks or makes more noise than it should, and
hastens to check the machine or set it in proper
motion, so Anna Pavlovna moved about her
drawing room, approaching now a silent, now
a too-noisy group, and by a word or slight re-
arrangement kept the conversational machine
in steady, proper, and regular motion. But
amid these cares her anxiety about Pierre was
evident. She kept an anxious watch on him
when he approached the group round Morte-
mart to listen to what was being said there, and
again when he passed to another group whose
center was the abbe*.

Pierre had been educated abroad, and this
reception at Anna Pavlovna's was the first he
had attended in Russia. He knew that all the
intellectual lights of Petersburg were gathered
there and, like a child in a toyshop, did not
know which way to look, afraid of missing any
clever conversation that was to be heard. See-
ing the self-confident and refined expression
on the faces of those present he was always ex-
pecting to hear something very profound. At
last he came up to Morio. Here the conversa-
tion seemed interesting and he stood waiting
for an opportunity to express his own views,
as young people are fond of doing.

CHAPTER III

ANNA PAVLOVNA'S reception was in full swing.
The spindles hummed steadily and ceaselessly
on all sides. With the exception of the aunt,
beside whom sat only one elderly lady, who
with her thin careworn face was rather out of
place in this brilliant society, the whole com-
pany had settled into three groups. One, chiefly
masculine, had formed round the abbe". An-
other, of young people, was grouped round
the beautiful Princess Hlne, Prince Vasfli's
daughter, and the little Princess Bolk6nskaya,
very pretty and rosy, though rather too plump
for her age. The third group was gathered
round Mortemart and Anna Pavlovna.

The vicomte was a nice-looking young man
with soft features and polished manners, who
evidently considered himself a celebrity but
out of politeness modestly placed himself at
the disposal of the circle in which he found
himself. Anna Pdvlovna was obviously serving
him up as a treat to her guests. As a clever
maitre d'hotel serves up as a specially choice
delicacy a piece of meat that no one who had
seen it in the kitchen would have cared to eat,
so Anna Pavlovna served up to her guests, first
the vicomte and then the abbe*, as peculiarly



choice morsels. The group about Mortemart
immediately began discussing the murder of the
Due d'Enghien. The vicomte said that the Due
d'Enghien had perished by his own magna-
nimity, and that there were particular reasons
for Buonaparte's hatred of him.

"Ah, yes! Do tell us all about it, Vicomte,"
said Anna Pdvlovna, with a pleasant feeling
that there was something a la Louis XV in the
sound of that sentence: "Contez nous gela,
Vicomte."

The vicomte bowed and smiled courteously
in token of his willingness to comply. Anna
Pavlovna arranged a group round him, invit-
ing everyone to listen to his tale.

"The vicomte knew the due personally,"
whispered Anna Pdvlovna to one of the guests.
"The vicomte is a wonderful raconteur," said
she to another. "How evidently he belongs to
the best society," said she to a third; and the
vicomte was served up to the company in the
choicest and most advantageous style, like a
well-garnished joint of roast beef on a hot
dish.

The vicomte wished to begin his story and
gave a subtle smile.

"Come over here, Hlne, dear," said Anna
Pvlovna to the beautiful young princess who
was sitting some way off, the center of another
group.

The princess smiled. She rose with the same
unchanging smile with which she had first en-
tered the room the smile of a perfectly beauti-
ful woman. With a slight rustle of her white
dress trimmed with moss and ivy, with a gleam
of white shoulders, glossy hair, and sparkling
diamonds, she passed between the men who
made way for her, not looking at any of them
but smiling on all, as if graciously allowing
each the privilege of admiring her beautiful
figure and shapely shoulders, back, and bosom
which in the fashion of those days were very
much exposed and she seemed to bring the
glamour of a ballroom with her as she moved
toward Anna Pavlovna. Hlene was so lovely
that not only did she not show any trace of
coquetry, but on the contrary she even appeared
shy of her unquestionable and all too victori-
ous beauty. She seemed to wish, but to be un-
able, to diminish its effect.

"How lovely!" said everyone who saw her;
and the vicomte lifted his shoulders and
dropped his eyes as if startled by something ex-
traordinary when she took her seat opposite and
beamed upon him also with her unchanging
smile.



6



WAR AND PEACE
 10ky
Joined: 11/15/2012
Msg: 86
whats the daftest thing you have done when drunk
Posted: 12/19/2017 8:03:44 AM
-chapo

It's madness, freaks and trolls, pal. It's sickening ... she one hell of a sack of shite... you mark me words. Bleh.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZC6Ot1MLP0

Madness, madness, they call it madness
Madness, madness, they call it madness
It's plain to see
That is what they mean to me
Madness, madness, they call it gladness, ha-ha

Madness, madness, they call it madness
Madness, madness, they call it madness
I'm about to explain
A-That someone is losing their brain
Hey, madness, madness, I call it gladness, yee-ha-ha-ha

Propaganda ministers
Propaganda ministers
I've a-got a heavy due
I'm gonna walk all over you
'Cause

Madness, madness, they call it madness
Well if this is madness
Then I know I'm filled with gladness
It's gonna be rougher
It's gonna be tougher, pa-da-da, pa-da-da
But I won't be the one who's gonna suffer
Oh no, I won't be the one who's gonna suffer
You are gonna be the one, a-you...


vvv
<3 <3

Here's an even better goal by el pibe de oro
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gK2z5-cceP4

(Argentina vs England - post Falklands :P )

xD xD xD xD
 rekirked
Joined: 11/7/2017
Msg: 88
whats the daftest thing you have done when drunk
Posted: 12/19/2017 8:06:36 AM
lovna's they listen to me. And that stupid set
without whom my wife cannot exist, an4 those
women ... If you only knew what those society
women are, and women in general I My father
is right. Selfish, vain, stupid, trivial in every-
thingthat's what women are when you see
them in their true colors! When you meet them
in society it seems as if there were something
in them, but there's nothing, nothing, noth-
ing! No, don't marry, my dear fellow; don't
marry!" concluded Prince Andrew.

"It seems funny to me," said Pierre, "that
you, you should consider yourself incapable
and your life a spoiled life. You have every-
thing before you, everything. And you . . ."

He did not finish his sentence, but his tone
showed how highly he thought of his friend
and how much he expected of him in the fu-
ture.

"How can he talk like that?" thought Pierre.
He considered his friend a model of perfec-
tion because Prince Andrew possessed in the
highest degree just the very qualities Pierre
lacked, and which might be best described as
strength of will. Pierre was always astonished
at Prince Andrew's calm manner of treating
everybody, his extraordinary memory, his ex-
tensive reading (he had read everything, knew
everything, and had an opinion about every-
thing), but above all at his capacity for work
and study. And if Pierre was often struck by
Andrew's lack of capacity for philosophical
meditation (to which he himself was particu-
larly addicted), he regarded even this not as a
defect but as a sign of strength.

Even in the best, most friendly and sim-
plest relations of life, praise and commenda-
tion are essential, just as grease is necessary to
wheels that they may run smoothly.

"My part is played out," said Prince An-
drew. "What's the use of talking about me?
Let us talk about you," he added after a si-
lence, smiling at his reassuring thoughts.

That smile was immediately reflected on
Pierre's face.

"But what is there to say about me?" said
Pierre, his face relaxing into a careless, merry
smile. "What am I? An illegitimate son!" He
suddenly blushed crimson, and it was plain that
he had made a great effort to say this. "With-
out a name and without means . . . And it
really . , ." But he did not say what "it really"
was. "For the present I am free and am all
right. Only I haven't the least idea what I am
to do; I wanted to consult you seriously."

Prince Andrew looked kindly at him, yet



his glance friendly and affectionate as it was
expressed a sense of his own superiority.

"I am fond of you, especially as you are the
one live man among our whole set. Yes, you're
all right! Choose what you will; it's all the
same. You'll be all right anywhere. But look
here: give up visiting those Kurdgins and lead-
ing that sort of life. It suits you so badly all
this debauchery, dissipation, and the rest of
it!"

"What would you have, my dear fellow?"
answered Pierre, shrugging his shoulders.
"Women, my dear fellow; women!"

"I don't understand it," replied Prince An-
drew. "Women who are comme il faut, that's
a different matter; but the Kuragins' set of
women, 'women and wine,' I -don't under-
stand!"

Pierre was staying at Prince Vasili Kurdgin's
and sharing the dissipated life of his son Ana-
tole, the son whom they were planning to re-
form by marrying him to Prince Andrew's
sister.

"Do you know?" said Pierre, as if suddenly
struck by a happy thought, "seriously, I have
long been thinking of it. ... Leading such a
life I can't decide or think properly about any-
thing. One's head aches, and one spends all
one's money. He asked me for tonight, but
1 won't go."

"You give me your word of honor not to
go?"

"On my honor!"
 rekirked
Joined: 11/7/2017
Msg: 89
whats the daftest thing you have done when drunk
Posted: 12/19/2017 8:07:13 AM
CHAPTER IX

1 r WAS past one o'clock when Pierre left his
friend. It was a cloudless, northern, summer
night. Pierre took an open cab intending to
drive straight home. But the nearer he drew to
the house the more he felt the impossibility of
going to sleep on such a night. It was light
enough to see a long way in the deserted street
and it seemed more like morning or evening
than night. On the way Pierre remembered
that Anatole Kuragin was expecting the usual
set for cards that evening, after which there
was generally a drinking bout, finishing with
visits of a kind Pierre was very fond of.

"I should like to go to Kuragin's," thought
he.

But he immediately recalled his promise to
Prince Andrew not to go there. Then, as hap-
pens to people of weak character, he desired
so passionately once more to enjoy that dissi-
pation he was so accustomed to that he de-
cided to go. The thought immediately occurred



i6



WAR AND PEACE



to him that his promise to Prince Andrew was
of no account, because before he gave it he
had already promised Prince Anatole to come
to his gathering; "besides," thought he, "all
such 'words of honor' are conventional things
with no definite meaning, especially if one
considers that by tomorrow one may be dead,
or something so extraordinary may happen to
one that honor and dishonor will be all the
samel" Pierre often indulged in reflections
of this sort, nullifying all his decisions and in-
tentions. He went to Kurdgin's.

Reaching the large house near the Horse
Guards' barracks, in which Anatole lived,
Pierre entered the lighted porch, ascended
the stairs, and went in at the open door. There
was no one in the anteroom; empty bottles,
cloaks, and overshoes were lying about; there
was a smell of alcohol, and sounds of voices
and shouting in the distance.

Cards and supper were over, but the visitors
had not yet dispersed. Pierre threw off his
cloak and entered the first room, in which were
the remains of supper. A footman, thinking
no one saw him, was drinking on the sly what
was left in the glasses. From the third room
came sounds of laughter, the shouting of famil-
iar voices, the growling of a bear, and general
commotion. Some eight or nine young men
were crowding anxiously round an open win-
dow. Three others were romping with a young
bear, one pulling him by the chain and trying
to set him at the others.

"I bet a hundred on Stevens!" shouted one.

"Mind, no holding on I" cried another.

"I bet on Dolokhovl" cried a third. "Kura-
gin, you part our hands."

"There, leave Bruin alone; here's a bet on."

"At one draught, or he loses!" shouted a
fourth.

"Jacob, bring a bottle!" shouted the host,
a tall, handsome fellow who stood in the midst
of the group, without a coat, and with his fine
linen shirt unfastened in front. "Wait a bit,
you fellows. . . . Here is Pdtya! Good man!"
cried he, addressing Pierre.

Another voice, from a man of medium
height with clear blue eyes, particularly strik-
ing among all these drunken voices by its sober
ring, criedfrom thewindow: "Comehere; part
the bets!" This was D61okhov, an officer of the
Semenov regiment, a notorious gambler and
duelist, who was living with Anatole. Pierre
smiled, looking about him merrily.

"I don't understand. What's it all about?"

"Wait a bit, he is not drunk yet! A bottle



here," said Anatole, and taking a glass from
the ta^le he went up to Pierre.

"First of all you must drink!"

Pierre drank one glass after another, look-
ing from under his brows at the tipsy guests
who were again crowding round the window,
and listening to their chatter. Anatole kept on
refilling Pierre's glass while explaining that
D61okhov was betting with Stevens, an Eng-
lish naval officer, that he would drink a bottle
of rum sitting on the outer ledge of the third-
floor window with his legs hanging out.

"Go on, you must drink it all," said Anatole,
giving Pierre the last glass, "or I won't let you
go!"

"No, I won't," said Pierre, pushing Anatole
aside, and he went up to the window.

D61okhov was holding the Englishman's
hand and clearly and distinctly repeating the
terms of the bet, addressing himself particu-
larly to Anatole and Pierre.

D61okhov was of medium height, with curly
hair and light-blue eyes. He was about twenty-
five. Like all infantry officers he wore no mus-
tache, so that his mouth, the most striking
feature of his face, was clearly seen. The lines
of that mouth were remarkably finely curved.
The middle of the upper lip formed a sharp
wedge and closed firmly on the firm lower one,
and something like two distinct smiles played
continually round the two corners of the
mouth; this, together with the resolute, inso-
lent intelligence of his eyes, produced an effect
which made it impossible not to notice his
face. D61okhov was a man of small means and
no connections. Yet, though Anatole spent
tens of thousands of rubles, D61okhov lived
with him and had placed himself on such a
footing that all who knew them, including Ana-
tole himself , respected him more than they did
Anatole. D61okhov could play all games and
nearly always won. However much he drank,
he never lost his clearheadedness. Both Kurdgin
and D61okhov were at that time notorious
among the rakes and scapegraces of Petersburg.

The bottle of rum was brought. The window
frame which prevented anyone from sitting
on the outer sill was being forced out by two
footmen, who were evidently flurried and in-
timidated by the directions and shouts of the
gentlemen around.

Anatole with his swaggering air strode up to
the window. He wanted to smash something.
Pushing away the footmen he tugged at the
frame, but could not move it. He smashed a
pane.



BOOK ONE



"You have a try, Hercules/' said he, Burning
to Pierre.

Pierre seized the crossbeam, tugged, and
wrenched the oak frame out with a crash.

"Take it right out, or they'll think I'm hold-
ing on," said D61okhov.

"Is the Englishman bragging? . . . Eh? Is it
all right?" said Anatole.

"First-rate," said Pierre, looking at D61ok-
hov, who with a bottle of rum in his hand was
approaching the window, from which the light
of the sky, the dawn merging with the after-
glow of sunset, was visible.

D61okhov,the bottle of rum still in his hand,
jumped onto the window sill. "Listen!" cried
he, standing there and addressing those in the
room. All were silent.

"I bet fifty imperials" he spoke French that
the Englishman might understand him, but he
did not speak it very well "I bet fifty im-
perials ... or do you wish to make it a hun-
dred?" added he, addressing the Englishman.

"No, fifty," replied the latter.

"All right. Fifty imperials . . . that I will
drink a whole bottle of rum without taking
it from my mouth, sitting outside the window
on this spot" (he stooped and pointed to the
sloping ledge outside the window) "and with-
out holding on to anything. Is that right?"

"Quite right," said the Englishman.

Anatole turned to the Englishman and tak-
ing him by one of the buttons of his coat and
looking down at him the Englishman was
short began repeating the terms of the wager
to him in English.

"Wait!" cried Dolokhov, hammering with
the bottle on the window sill to attract atten-
tion. "Wait a bit, Kuragin. Listen! If anyone
else does the same, I will pay him a hundred
imperials. Do you understand?"

The Englishman nodded, but gave no in-
dication whether he intended to accept this
challenge or not. Anatole did not release him,
and though he kept nodding to show that he
understood, Anatole went on translating D6-
lokhov's words into English. A thin young lad,
an hussar of the Life Guards, who had been
losing that evening, climbed on the window
sill, leaned over, and looked down.

"Ohl Ohl Oh!" he muttered, looking down
from the window at the stones of the pave-
ment.

"Shut up!" cried D61okhov, pushing him
away from the window. The lad jumped awk-
wardly back into the room, tripping over his
spurs.



Placing the bottle on the window sill where
he could reach it easily, D61okhov climbed
carefully and slowly through the window and
lowered his legs. Pressing against both sides
of the window, he adjusted himself on his seat,
lowered his hands, moved a little to the right
and then to the left, and took up the bottle.
Anatole brought two candles and placed them
on the window sill, though it was already quite
light. Dolokhov's back in his white shirt, and
his curly head, were lit up from both sides.
Everyone crowded to the window, the English-
man in front. Pierre stood smiling but silent.
One man, older than the others present, sud-
denly pushed forward with a scared and angry
look and wanted to seize hold of Dolokhov's
shirt.

"I say, this is folly! He'll be killed," said this
more sensible man.

Anatole stopped him.

"Don't touch him! You'll startle him and
then he'll be killed. Eh? ... What then? . . .
Eh?"

D61okhov turned round and, again holding
on with both hands, arranged himself on his
scat.

"If anyone comes meddling again," said he,
emitting the words separately through his thin
compressed lips, "I willthrowhim down there.
Now then!"

Saying this he again turned round, dropped
his hands, took the bottle and lifted it to his
lips, threw back his head, and raised his free
hand to balance himself. One of the footmen
who had stooped to pick up some broken glass
remained in that position without taking his
eyes from the window and from D61okhov's
back. Anatole stood erect with staring eyes.
The Englishman looked on sideways, pursing
up his lips. The man who had wished to stop
the affair ran to a corner of the room and
threw himself on a sofa with his face to the
wall. Pierre hid his face, from which a faint
smile forgot to fade though his features now
expressed horror and fear. All were still. Pierre
took his hands from his eyes. Dolokhov still
sat in the same position, only his head was
thrown further back till his curly hair touched
his shirt collar, and the hand holding the bot-
tle was lifted higher and higher and trembled
with the effort. The bottle was emptying per-
ceptibly and rising still higher and his head
tilting yet further back. "Why is it so long?"
thought Pierre. It seemed to him that more
than half an hour had elapsed. Suddenly D6-
lokhov made a backward movement with his



i8



WAR AND PEACE
 rekirked
Joined: 11/7/2017
Msg: 90
whats the daftest thing you have done when drunk
Posted: 12/19/2017 8:09:16 AM
Just thought i'd add to the MEANINGLESS FVCKING DRIVEL ON HERE !!!!!!!




order to maintain the highest quality forums you are restricted to having no more then 2 of the last 10 posts on a thread.
Since 2 of the last 10 posts are yours you can not post to this thread.
 imanorangetiger
Joined: 12/29/2011
Msg: 91
view profile
History
whats the daftest thing you have done when drunk
Posted: 12/19/2017 8:11:13 AM
Actually, I'd agree that Scarey has been harsh towards you, Pauline. I'd imagine you're feeling exactly the same as all the others have when your new friend does it. You got so fed up with his warped antics before, you left. Remember? After you told him how destructive he was? Nothing has changed there as far as others can see.

I imagine that Scarey is now treating you as an extension of him, and it's got worse from there. If he wasn't here, would she be laying into you? Probably not. As I've previously said, he's a malignant cancer.

Is her profile fake? Bold assumption on your part. Have you and 10ky met? Who knows? You certainly seem to have conversed although you and he have a difference of opinion as to whether he's as much of a pillock offline as on. Is his first language English? Who knows? I'd wager that his first language is Gibberish, since he's obviously fluent in it.

Why should I stick my neck out though for you though? I have done so in the past and got no thanks or recognition for it. You have never stuck up for me when 10ky has trolled me either.

You're on your own.
 10ky
Joined: 11/15/2012
Msg: 92
whats the daftest thing you have done when drunk
Posted: 12/19/2017 8:15:09 AM
-pauline

Check this out:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jOz2uGMTA2w

Orgasmic. A whole fu.cking team tackling him AND NOBODY COULD STOP HIM. Never has the world and never will the world see better or even close.... A shame they don't make them like him no more. Shame.
 RoxyMoronic
Joined: 6/7/2016
Msg: 93
whats the daftest thing you have done when drunk
Posted: 12/19/2017 8:19:41 AM
oh oh this is for real
Once when drunk I needed a wee reallllly badly, my gf beat me to the loo. I jumped on the sink, it came away from the wall and burst a pipe. Flooded would be over-doing it but there was plenty of water......not me, the pipe.

Kirky......what a fascinating read....all of it :/
 billybonds
Joined: 8/8/2014
Msg: 94
whats the daftest thing you have done when drunk
Posted: 12/19/2017 8:23:49 AM
Well I think they've met and are an item..


https://youtu.be/-ZzFtjgtMvU
 Justanotherchap
Joined: 12/4/2013
Msg: 95
view profile
History
whats the daftest thing you have done when drunk
Posted: 12/19/2017 8:31:32 AM
I agree with you.
 Justanotherchap
Joined: 12/4/2013
Msg: 97
view profile
History
whats the daftest thing you have done when drunk
Posted: 12/19/2017 9:07:12 AM
Did he drink the whole bottle? Did he fall or did the butler catch him?
 imanorangetiger
Joined: 12/29/2011
Msg: 98
view profile
History
whats the daftest thing you have done when drunk
Posted: 12/19/2017 9:15:53 AM

There are people on here who like Paul and who have never interacted with him in a negative way.


You and Roxy? I think that about covers it.


You've called me a few names yourself lately


Really? Show me, and I'll concede to that if I did. I very rarely name-call unless it's come my way first, and even then it's more often than not after a second shot's been fired.
 imanorangetiger
Joined: 12/29/2011
Msg: 100
view profile
History
whats the daftest thing you have done when drunk
Posted: 12/19/2017 10:43:42 AM
^ He was to me. Simply because I said that he'd do better with women if he didn't refer to them as bums and tits. I obviously struck a nerve asking him to imagine what it would be like to be referred to as simply short and bald. He's been trolling me ever since.
 10ky
Joined: 11/15/2012
Msg: 101
whats the daftest thing you have done when drunk
Posted: 12/19/2017 11:15:49 AM
-Jack
Thank you for your honesty. I appreciate that very much. Indeed, I do make it a point not to offend anyone and not to attack anyone unless I am attacked first. Thanks again.

-orange

I said that he'd do better with women if he didn't refer to them as bums and tits.

With all due respect but you are lying blatantly with that. You attacked me out of the blue calling me short probably because you are very insecure about your height. NO OTHER REASON AT ALL. THAT IS AN ATTACK In fact, as soon as I read your comment, I remember thinking to myself: "Wanna bet he is gonnae be a short unattractive guy?" I check you profile and bang! There you were. 60, fat and wee, so I simply let you know that people who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones. You've been haunting me since, foaming at the mouth and trying to bring me down in any way you can think of. Even when I ignore you, you still keep coming for more. What am I supposed to do with you?
 imanorangetiger
Joined: 12/29/2011
Msg: 102
view profile
History
whats the daftest thing you have done when drunk
Posted: 12/19/2017 11:21:34 AM
Later on, I'll post a link to it, and then we'll see who's being honest, and see you worm your way out of it.

On the other hand, you can always do it yourself. Since every time I've called you out on your blatant dishonesty, you've either slunk back into the shadows or projected some more of your insecurities, I doubt that will happen.
 10ky
Joined: 11/15/2012
Msg: 103
whats the daftest thing you have done when drunk
Posted: 12/19/2017 11:41:50 AM
-orange

Idiot. What are you going to proof with a link? Your true motive? Why would you go about calling **a total stranger who has never said a word to you** short and bald - especially given that you are defective down to the bone yourself? Your true motive was simply to be cruel to meso as to feel less inferior due to your short stature, weight, age, lack of education and sense of humour and conspicuous unpopularity with opposite sex.

PS: Don't forget to post the link.
 imanorangetiger
Joined: 12/29/2011
Msg: 105
view profile
History
whats the daftest thing you have done when drunk
Posted: 12/20/2017 3:06:49 AM
https://forums.plentyoffish.com/16602931datingPostpage3.aspx

My main modality is Gestalt. That process revolves around bringing someone's awareness to their behaviour in ways that they are more likely to understand. This thread revolved around you objectifying women and reducing them to their body parts. I used your own vernacular to demonstrate to you how it might feel for a woman not to be seen as a whole person. There was no deliberate cruelty involved, just a ploy to bring something important to your attention.

The fact that you immediately went on the defensive, making dishonest remarks regarding my age and appearance blatantly illustrated that you are deeply insecure about your own presentation.

I'm clearly not 60. However, on the other hand, you clearly worry about getting older and being stuck where you are. I'm not fat, though you clearly worry about appearing so yourself. I'm clearly not bald, though you measure your own lack of hair against other people's. I have no problems being 5'7". I have dated people who have been between 4'11 and 5'8. I see women who prefer taller men; I simply turn the page. I don't have a hissy fit about it. However, you do have an issue with your height and its restrictions. Understandable. It's probably how larger women feel when you refer to them as blubbery. I am longsighted. I am not blind. I am not squinty, nor do I wear thick lenses. I am clearly university educated, to diploma level, which is enough to enable me to practise. I have deferred my degree year because it enables me to train in other modalities in the meantime, and simply because I can. I enjoy my work immensely. I do not work in a convenience store. As an ex civil servant, I was able to take my pension early. I live quite comfortably, thanks. However, as you posted about it yourself, you are obviously unhappy with your life's progress. Lastly, I have no problems attracting women, because I see them as people in their own right. I don't have to play the white knight. Despite your vile remarks about my girlfriend's age and appearance, she's neither old or fat. I don't feel the need to brag about that, even though you feel the need to drag it up on a regular basis. You are constantly dishonest with your remarks and they amount to ad hominem attacks. Maybe if they were true, they might sting. As it is, they're merely perplexing.

I had you marked down as deeply insecure very early on and you haven't disappointed. I can understand why you'd feel the need to project so much and why you need to bring attention to yourself so frequently. I see people like you on a regular basis in my counselling room. Thing is though, they're middle teenagers. You're not. My Berne reference was to your prominent child ego state. I wonder why you behave in the way you do, yet Wrightbus doesn't.
 10ky
Joined: 11/15/2012
Msg: 106
whats the daftest thing you have done when drunk
Posted: 12/20/2017 5:06:28 AM
-orange

The link proves exactly what I have been saying all along and you accused me of lying. You've attacked me out of the blue on that thread. I had never said a word to you before then. I, of course, replied and you've been chasing me around, spewing hate and rubbish at me since then! Thankfully there are honest people on here as you've just seen.


My main modality is Gestalt.

Pa, your only modality is bullying. You are a bully. Anger, jealousy and a crushed self esteem is what drives you. You've been on here long enough to make that obvious. Another thing you are is a mangina (for lack of a better word). You bully men you perceive as "competition" to make yourself appear "big" or some sort of savour or knight to the ladies in the vain hope of a date. That would be acceptable behaviour for a teenager but at your age ... you must be emotionally stunted.


This thread revolved around you objectifying women and reducing them to their body parts. I used your own vernacular to demonstrate to you how it might feel for a woman not to be seen as a whole person.

Which female body parts was I discussing that would be the equivalent of "short and bald" and are "short and bald" even body parts? Tits and bum you said? You reckon those are the equivalent of "short and bald"? WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE GOING TO FOOL? you've just made this shite up now.


The fact that you immediately went on the defensive, making dishonest remarks regarding my age and appearance blatantly illustrated that you are deeply insecure about your own presentation.

Pointing out that you are rather challenged in matters of looks, and that therefore you shouldn't be attack people on their looks is not going on the defensive. I was only standing up to your bullying. I was teaching you what bullying feels like so that you may stop and start behaving properly for your age and these forums. Fighting fire with fire.


I'm clearly not 60. However, on the other hand, you clearly worry about getting older and being stuck where you are. I'm not fat, though you clearly worry about appearing so yourself. I'm clearly not bald, though you measure your own lack of hair against other people's. I have no problems being 5'7". I have dated people who have been between 4'11 and 5'8. I see women who prefer taller men; I simply turn the page. I don't have a hissy fit about it. However, you do have an issue with your height and its restrictions. Understandable. It's probably how larger women feel when you refer to them as blubbery. I am longsighted. I am not blind. I am not squinty, nor do I wear thick lenses.

60 and 56, is it not the same? Yeah, I worry about getting older. So what? Aye, you are fat and aye, I have to lose weight cause I am as fat as you at this point and I do not like it one bit. You don't have problems being a wee guy aye? LMAO!! By god you do! You have a running feud with me about it and with RenaissanceMan. I mean, the first thing you told me was essentially: "You're short." More proof than that, you won't get. You rarely get a tall dude call someone else short under normal circumstances. Listen here, your height is what it is. You cannot change it (except for an additional 4' at best and that's insignificant I say). Learn to live with it!


I am clearly university educated, to diploma level, which is enough to enable me to practise. I have deferred my degree year because it enables me to train in other modalities in the meantime, and simply because I can. I enjoy my work immensely. I do not work in a convenience store. As an ex civil servant, I was able to take my pension early. I live quite comfortably, thanks.

Why do you come here confessing to me? This is just like when you came here telling me that you have a gf and that I don't and etc. It's crazy! If this isn't insecurity, I don't know what is. Dude, I do not care. You are not competing with me. Keep your distance and I'll keep mine.


However, as you posted about it yourself, you are obviously unhappy with your life's progress. Lastly, I have no problems attracting women, because I see them as people in their own right. I don't have to play the white knight. Despite your vile remarks about my girlfriend's age and appearance, she's neither old or fat. I don't feel the need to brag about that, even though you feel the need to drag it up on a regular basis. You are constantly dishonest with your remarks and they amount to ad hominem attacks. Maybe if they were true, they might sting. As it is, they're merely perplexing.


Lol! You do not feel the need to brag about pulling a woman? I mean.. are you even serious with that? Go back and re-read what you wrote man. Liar. You don't play the white knight?!?! ARE YOU FKN KIDDING ME!? smh.
 imanorangetiger
Joined: 12/29/2011
Msg: 107
view profile
History
whats the daftest thing you have done when drunk
Posted: 12/20/2017 5:30:09 AM
No surprise that you're slipping into the child ego state and exhibiting the very behaviour and dishonesty I pointed out six months ago. You are one of the most insecure people I've come across. I could write a case study on it.

And if I've lied anywhere, feel free to link to it.
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