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 NewYorker58
Joined: 6/11/2013
Msg: 25
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DIFFERENT Languages and CulturesPage 2 of 2    (1, 2)
Some Asians dislike dark skin, because those people are considered lowly field workers. It's one reason why they protect their skin from tanning.
 vlad dracul
Joined: 4/30/2009
Msg: 26
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History
DIFFERENT Languages and Cultures
Posted: 7/3/2018 12:10:32 AM
We had a telly show here one time about Scottish accents in Hollywood. Michael Cains was err how shall we say em 'different'

This below though brought howls of laughter. Ginger Rodgers and Fred Astair.............

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=fLI0zBVyOIE



And this again from Auchtermuchty/Edinburgh's favourite twins..........

"Throw The 'R' Away"

I've been so sad
Since you said my accent was bad
He's worn a frown
This Caledonian clown

I'm just going to have to learn to hesitate
To make sure my words
On your Saxon ears don't grate
But I wouldn't know a single word to say
If I flattened all the vowels
And threw the 'R' away

Some days I stand
On your green and pleasant land
How dare I show face
When my diction is such a disgrace

I'm just going to have to learn to hesitate
To make sure my words
On your Saxon ears don't grate
But I wouldn't know a single word to say
If I flattened all the vowels
And threw the 'R' away

You say that if I want to get ahead
The language I use should be left for dead
It doesn't please your ear
And though you tell it like a leg-pull
It seems your still full of John Bull
You just refuse to hear

Oh what can I do
To be understood by you
Perhaps for some money
I could talk like a bee dripping honey.

I'm just going to have to learn to hesitate
To make sure my words
On your Saxon ears don't grate
But I wouldn't know a single word to say
If I flattened all the vowels
And threw the 'R' away

You say that if I want to get ahead
The language I use should be left for dead
It doesn't please your ear
And though you tell it like a leg-pull
I think your still full of John Bull
You just refuse to hear

He's been so sad
Since you said his accent was bad
He's worn a frown
This Caledonian clown

I'm just going to have to learn to hesitate
To make sure my words
On your Saxon ears don't grate
But I wouldn't know a single word to say
If I flattened all the vowels
And threw the 'R' away
Flattened all the vowels
And threw the 'R' away
If I flattened all the vowels
And threw the 'R' away

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=066oSmDRKPA


And here be some linguistics gadgie manging Scots.........

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/scotland/11749608/Scottish-accents-Why-Rs-are-rolling-off-native-tongue.html
 BLONDE_ANGEL_1
Joined: 4/27/2018
Msg: 27
DIFFERENT Languages and Cultures
Posted: 7/3/2018 5:40:39 AM
Love the Proclaimers & their big hit "I'm gonna Be"

BUT

this version is pretty good too

https://youtu.be/ggu0ZqqBq4k






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 NotGorshkovAgain
Joined: 4/29/2009
Msg: 28
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History
DIFFERENT Languages and Cultures
Posted: 7/3/2018 11:56:29 AM
Highliner Fish Products had a commercial years ago. It featured a stereotypical Newfoundland fisherman. He was standing on the shore at the bottom of a cliff, waves crashing all around him, and wearing a Sou'wester. He spoke on and on about the pride Highliner took in the selection of its fish, the cleaning, the packaging, and the energy and effort they expended trying to ensure that their fish got from the ocean to your table as quickly, cheaply, and freshly as possible.

Now since this fisherman was the real thing - from as deep in the bay as possible - there was only one problem; nobody who wasn't from the rock would have had the slightest clue wtf he was saying, because he was speaking so fast, with such a strong accent, and a vocabulary not heard outside Newfoundland for 200 years. Which is probably why the commercial came complete with English subtitles :)
 2ufo
Joined: 12/25/2017
Msg: 29
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History
DIFFERENT Languages and Cultures
Posted: 7/3/2018 12:58:52 PM

WTF were you doing in Tunisia?

Working.

Mmm, I love The Proclaimers also.


I've heard JAPAN is extremely YELLOW(?) and hate white people, but had a love for all things American (past tense).

I found the Japanese to be very gracious but 'konichiway ohio goziemass' and the appropriate bow got me through a lot.
 LGL1975
Joined: 6/7/2015
Msg: 30
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History
DIFFERENT Languages and Cultures
Posted: 7/3/2018 2:52:09 PM

Seriously? What part of Canada did you live in?
My best friend at 4 years-old had way darker skin than I did. That was back in the 50's.
You lived a sheltered life?


Whatever. I was five years old when I came here. Didn't even speak a word of English. And now I speak three languages. How's that for a sheltered life.

I'm not going to pay any mind to the ramblings of a bigot.
DIFFERENT Languages and Cultures
Posted: 7/3/2018 4:42:07 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5JfFJ7R8pDs
 427cammer
Joined: 3/1/2008
Msg: 32
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History
DIFFERENT Languages and Cultures
Posted: 7/3/2018 10:02:19 PM
drinkthesunwithmyface:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5JfFJ7R8pDs

.... so do you agree with Steven Pinker?... I see on his Wikipedia page that he is considered as a linguist (...someone who uses language?), but when Bono said "Fvcking Brilliant" is the word "fvcking" to be considered as an adjective or an adverb?

For myself, I have trouble categorising "brilliant" as either a noun or a verb, usually "brilliant" would be considered an adjective.... "brilliantly" is usually an adverb.... "brilliance" would be considered a noun, no? If pressed, in this instance I would lean towards calling it a noun... in which case "fvcking" is an adjective.
DIFFERENT Languages and Cultures
Posted: 7/3/2018 11:01:04 PM
Brilliant is an adjective. Whatever modifies an adjective is an adverb. Was that your question? And no, brilliant isn't a noun nor verb.

On topic - I love the existence of different languages and accents. I love differences in intonations. And I think that it's very interesting how the brain works a little differently when speaking a different language, and even when just using different emphasis and intonation. Human spoken language is a deep hole of awesomeness and magic and great consequence. Steven Pinker has had a lot to say about language which is quite insightful.
 427cammer
Joined: 3/1/2008
Msg: 34
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DIFFERENT Languages and Cultures
Posted: 7/3/2018 11:45:34 PM
Thanks, that was my question. I'd thought that adverbs were used to describe verbs and that was all. Either I was never taught differently or I just wasn't paying attention... breaking down sentence structure was never the most interesting thing for me.
 vlad dracul
Joined: 4/30/2009
Msg: 35
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History
DIFFERENT Languages and Cultures
Posted: 7/4/2018 1:32:01 AM
As a speaker of the East Lowland Scots language here in Edinburgh we also have lots of gypsy expressions we use.

Maging the cant. Travellers have their own lingo. The Cant.

So this post MAY be of interest to lingo lovers because if you ever visit Edinburgh you will hear words like barry, gadgie, mort, chavvie, choory, chore, screeve, joogle, shan etc etc...............


He then goes on to trace much of the language spoken by European Gypsies back to ‘Hindustan’.4

The less well-known author Walter Simson was a collector of Scottish Gypsy Language in the early nineteenth century and was in correspondence with Sir Walter Scott.

His findings were published and edited by his son James Simson in 1865 under the title A History of the Gipsies with specimens of the Gipsy Language.

My interest in the language of the Travelling Community began in childhood when I became friends with a Gypsy girl at primary school, and was exposed to words from her language. In this way quite a number of Gypsy words were borrowed into the vocabulary of Scottish school children. These words often survive in Scots (where they have been lost elsewhere).

A typical example would be nash, a Romany loan word meaning ‘to leave, quit, flee’, which is defined in the latest edition of the Oxford English Dictionary (2003) as ‘obsolete Cant’ with the final attestation dating from 1832.

The word survives in modern Scots, where the meaning has evolved into ‘rush, to hurry’, with enough evidence collected to warrant a new entry in the 2005 Supplement to the Scottish National Dictionary.

nash v leave, go away, with implication of hurrying: “Is that the time? I’ve goat tae [got to] nash!” 19-. n, also nasher a deserter 19. [from Romany naš –’to flee’ from Sanskrit nas– ‘to be lost, perish, disappear, run away’]

NOTE: Grose and Egan (1823) define as ‘To go away from, or quit, any place or company’. The verb has passed into use in Edinburgh and the surrounding areas. It appears to be used especially by schoolchildren […].

Grellmann (1787) collected the forms Naſch ‘to flow’ and Nazh ‘to hunt’ from Continental gypsies.7

There are many other words of Romany or Cant origin which have passed into Scots, which are not found in English.

For example the noun peev or peeve, meaning an alcoholic drink or more specifically whisky; the verb peevan to drink alcohol; the adjective peevie meaning drunk intoxicated: “I’d be trash to fek okrie off her for she’s a peevie old manishi.” [I’d be afraid to take anything from her because she’s a drunken old woman.]; and peever, a drunkard.

A further example of a Romany word which has passed into Scots is hirie, which now means ‘money’, but originally meant a half penny or penny, from hira, hirae, hirie.

It is interesting to note that hiries is used in modern Edinburgh Scots to mean money in general. Its use was popularised by the Edinburgh author Irvine Welsh in his 1993 novel Trainspotting.


There are however, examples of words for people who took to the travelling life by marrying a Traveller or Gypsy, for example buck, a non-traveller man married to a traveller woman, a person who decides to become a traveller more generall, or someone with only one traveller parent: “Sandy learned the mouth organ from a wee buck gadgie [man].”

Travellers also had their own names for towns, sometimes specific or sometimes more general, e.g. Beenvile for Glasgow (Compare this to been ‘fine, good, costly rich, gentle’), and baurie forest a large town (Compare to barry ‘big, great’ + forest which is possibly a development of Romany foros or vauros ‘a city’).

Historically, although there was sometimes friction between the two groups, very often they got along reasonably well. In former times Travellers and Gypsies were a very good labour force for seasonal work, for example working at ‘the berries’ alongside their Scottish neighbours:

berries; the berries n phrase the time of soft fruit gathering which takes place around the Perthshire town of Blairgowrie during the summer months: “[…]we had to go to the berries[…]” 20-. [Scots; specificially the Berry Fields of Blair[gowrie]]

Although there are still some people who continue with the travelling lifestyle, as a community they are much reduced. Fortunately, in the 21st century people are more tolerant of alternative lifestyles, and despite some continuing conflicts, by and large there is less of a divide between the two communities.

https://www.thebottleimp.org.uk/2013/05/a-dictionary-of-the-languages-of-scottish-travellers/
 DDSearle
Joined: 5/20/2017
Msg: 36
Accents, Dialects, Language And Culture
Posted: 7/4/2018 12:17:02 PM
Some accents, such as British English in Received Pronunciation (which is not the Oxford Accent), are pleasant to listen to. But others, such as the Yorskshire accent, are less-than-good to hear. And, in the U K, there are many to be heard; but there are not as many dialects as in, say, Germany. The latter can make it remarkably hard for those in one region of the country to communicate with those in another part. Some dialects, such as Hanoverian Hochdeutsch, are held to be nobler or posher than others; others, such as Bairisch are taken to be common as muck; and one or two, such as Schwiizertüütsch are celebrated for their quaintness
Some folks will get snobbish about accents. For instance, in viewing a French Canadian film on a French TV channel, I noticed that the entire soundtrack was subtitled – as though those Canadians are incapable of using that language properly. And, on Greek T V, I saw a Greek Cypriot movie treated similarly
And in my travels, I've noticed that some speakers of English – especially young Northern Irish or Scottish women, will, when overseas, feign an American accent – presumably because their home accent lends itself easily to the US one, which they take to be more glamorous. This type can often be found in the media
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