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 AceOfSpace
Joined: 5/28/2007
Msg: 70
Cast Iron, Aluminum, Stainless Steel, Teflon..Page 3 of 4    (1, 2, 3, 4)
Copper w/ stainless lining? Awesome!!!!!!!!

If you don't want 'em, let me know! Dibs!!!!!!!
 fixitfred
Joined: 11/10/2007
Msg: 71
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History
Cast Iron, Aluminum, Stainless Steel, Teflon..
Posted: 3/5/2008 7:14:07 PM
I don't get the stainless steel thing the first time I tried to fry an egg using oil it stuck to the damn pan and took lots of scrubbing. I love teflon easy to use and clean but it doesn't last and when it flakes off you can't help but ingest it and it can't be good for you. Never heard it caused cancer or came across any hard evidence that it is harmful but still worry.
 AceOfSpace
Joined: 5/28/2007
Msg: 72
Cast Iron, Aluminum, Stainless Steel, Teflon..
Posted: 3/6/2008 4:34:51 AM
The trick to stainless is to lower the heat a little.

The trick to frying eggs is to use butter. Oil gets too hot for 'em, and you want the water to form a vapor cushion between the sticky proteins and the metal. Proteins are heavier than oil, so without the vapor barrier, you'll always get stuck eggs--even with Teflon. They just won't stick quite as badly as with other materials.

The trick to cleaning stainless is to let it soak a while. But if worse comes to worst, break out the brillo!

Teflon at too high a heat (over 450F) does release carcinogens that can be absorbed by the food or breathed in. Not good, and not just when it's chipped.
 kscowboy32
Joined: 8/19/2007
Msg: 73
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Cast Iron, Aluminum, Stainless Steel, Teflon..
Posted: 3/6/2008 9:19:33 AM
all i have is cast iron. ive fixed about everything in one of my dutch ovens from cobblers brownies to chicken fried steaks. cant beat the taste that you get from cast iron.
 NarcissusTemple
Joined: 4/23/2009
Msg: 74
Cast Iron, Aluminum, Stainless Steel, Teflon..
Posted: 2/9/2011 10:07:56 PM
draggin up this ol' thread to insert this warning:

I just killed my two parakeets by accidentally leaving a Circulon (non-stick) pan on my electric stove on high for about an hour.
I discovered the pan, removed it, turned the burner off, then about a half hour later I heard one of my bird's last distress chirp.
Went in to check and he was dead. While holding the dead bird, the other one started staggering around and died about 5 minutes later.
I didn't smell any chemical fumes. I live in an apartment, have no fire place or connected garages, so it wasn't CO or CO2 (some people have asked, "How do you know it was the pan?")

I'd read about the dangers of Teflon in a bird book about 15 years ago, but didn't take it too seriously.
Thought it was written by an over-zealous lot.
It's a high price to pay for reform, and it doesn't seem to be common knowledge.
Here are a few links:

This one is specifically related to birds and non-stick fumes:
http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=15+1829&aid=2874

This page is from Environmental Work Group. It has comprehensive information about the toxins released by non-stick cookware. See the right column of headings for more information as this is only one of many pages of info.
http://www.ewg.org/node/8302

So I'll be ridding myself of my non-sticks, and sticking with my cast iron and stainless. Aluminum--ick!
 dontlikemennomore
Joined: 1/24/2011
Msg: 75
Cast Iron, Aluminum, Stainless Steel, Teflon..
Posted: 2/10/2011 8:25:56 AM
i'm so sorry about your birds...that is so sad...but i prefer cast iron over all pots & pans...going out today picking me up another cast iron pan...there is a different taste a better taste with food i believe using cast iron...& thank you for sharing those links...i'll give them to a friend who has many birds...
 Molly Maude
Joined: 9/11/2008
Msg: 76
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Cast Iron, Aluminum, Stainless Steel, Teflon..
Posted: 2/10/2011 3:19:28 PM
sorry to hear about your birds ... yes, Teflon coated pans can create hazardous fumes ... probably to more than just the birds ... birds are very sensitive to air-borne pathogens ...

I fell asleep one night and burnt an egg to a crisp in a copper-bottomed stainless steel pot ... the house was full of God-knows what, along with the smoke ... the smoke alarm came on which roused me from my deep slumber ... I staggered around, turned OFF the stove, turned ON the fans, opened doors ...

I noticed that my parrot had been huddled at the bottom of his cage ... the cokatiel (deliberately misspelled ... dirty word, you know) ... was at the top of his cage and staggering ... it took him another day ... he stopped talking, started shaking and just died ... I stood there and helplessly watched ... so sad ...

that's been 6 months ago and the parrot is still fine ... so it's not JUST burnt Teflon fumes that kills birds ... I'm wondering on the long-term effects of any kind of smoke on all living things ...


as for the original question! I can no longer LIFT my cast iron pots and skillets ... so have gone solely to the stainless steel ... and the pretty enameled ones!!
 NarcissusTemple
Joined: 4/23/2009
Msg: 77
Cast Iron, Aluminum, Stainless Steel, Teflon..
Posted: 2/14/2011 11:46:03 AM
Thanks for the condolences, afitness and molly.

Sorry to hear about your c0ckatiel. They're such nice birds. Glad your parrot is OK.
 arwen52
Joined: 3/13/2008
Msg: 78
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Cast Iron, Aluminum, Stainless Steel, Teflon..
Posted: 2/14/2011 2:39:21 PM
Aluminum, well too many studies that say it's not good.

If you look through credible scientific research, you will find that concerns about aluminum cookware and a possible link to Alzheimer's has been discredited. If you look on the internet, you'll still find a lot of unfounded scare stories, as you will undoubtedly find here.

I mostly cook with cast iron, glass, Corning ware, stainless steel, and enamel coated cast aluminum. The only aluminum I have at home is some baking pans. However, most of the cookware used in restaurants is aluminum. It can be very good.

I do not like Teflon. You have to be careful about scratching it and it wears off over time.

Cast iron and stainless steel need to be cleaned and handled in particular ways. You do *not* want to scratch stainless steel and cast iron does not want to stay wet or have the seasoning rubbed off. If you want ease of use and don't want to fuss with it, plus want something less expensive, aluminum is actually very good.

There is no one answer. A lot is personal preference and style.


I believe that teflon is very dangerous such as causing cancer. Just my opinion.

Whether something causes cancer or not is not a matter of opinion. It's a matter of fact. If you're going to make a statement that is a matter of fact, please supply some reliable data to back it up.

If you have the opinion that you like or dislike Teflon, you are entitled to it.

I don't like Teflon either and that's purely a matter of opinion.
 viper1j
Joined: 11/30/2005
Msg: 79
Cast Iron, Aluminum, Stainless Steel, Teflon..
Posted: 2/19/2011 5:10:03 PM
Non stick for omelettes.

Having said that, you need cast iron for this..

Pan Seared Rib Eye
1 boneless rib eye steak, 1 1/2-inch thick
Canola oil to coat
Kosher salt and ground black pepper

Place 10 to 12-inch cast iron skillet in oven and heat oven to 500 degrees. Bring steak(s) to room temperature.

When oven reaches temperature, remove pan and place on range over high heat. Coat steak lightly with oil and season both sides with a generous pinch of salt. Grind on black pepper to taste.

Immediately place steak in the middle of hot, dry pan. Cook 30 seconds without moving. Turn with tongs and cook another 30 seconds, then put the pan straight into the oven for 2 minutes. Flip steak and cook for another 2 minutes. (This time is for medium rare steaks. If you prefer medium, add a minute to both of the oven turns.)

Remove steak from pan, cover loosely with foil, and rest for 2 minutes. Serve whole or slice thin and fan onto plate.
 Bronxtaino9
Joined: 6/14/2010
Msg: 82
Cast Iron, Aluminum, Stainless Steel, Teflon..
Posted: 3/28/2011 2:34:59 AM
Stainless steel without a doubt. Got a wolfgang puck set, all that aluminum and teflon stuff is no good for your health.
 shakeitupbaby2012
Joined: 8/12/2010
Msg: 83
Cast Iron, Aluminum, Stainless Steel, Teflon..
Posted: 4/18/2011 9:45:05 AM

I mostly use high grade stainless steal with copper clad cooking cores and stainless steel or tephlon cooking surfaces for most of my cooking.


I grab whatever's on sale ^^^- Jamie Oliver, All Clad, etc

I have one teflon pan and I replace it often so that I don't get teflon residue- I don't use it often

I have SS Spaghetti pots, etc- everything else is SS and glass- glass storage as well for leftovers

I have an indoor grill that I like- hmmm...probably a teflon surface- need to look into that
 writercookmt
Joined: 5/28/2011
Msg: 84
Cast Iron, Aluminum, Stainless Steel, Teflon..
Posted: 6/23/2011 8:45:27 PM
cast iron is the best. Not only does it add iron to your food but you can get higher temps especially for cajun or any blackened meats.

I like stainless for everything else bec there is never any residue from the last thing you cooked. Make sure it is oiled up and never let your food sit long - you will not have much problem cleaning.

If you want to make french pudding the right way - copper
 BlueTeaPot
Joined: 6/25/2011
Msg: 85
Cast Iron, Aluminum, Stainless Steel, Teflon..
Posted: 7/1/2011 11:14:48 PM
cast iron is terrific....

BUT I love my Paderno cookware made in PEI, Canada.

I even shipped it to New Zealand! where I now live.
 SapporoArtois
Joined: 6/9/2011
Msg: 86
Cast Iron, Aluminum, Stainless Steel, Teflon..
Posted: 7/6/2011 4:53:32 AM
Cast Iron is my favorite.
You're right about Aluminum, but it offers even cooking temperatures, and the most used throughout kitchens in the industry.
I use stainless steel for home use. Pain to clean, and takes forever to heat up evenly, but it's a safe choice.
 RichenLosAngeles
Joined: 11/14/2010
Msg: 87
Cast Iron, Aluminum, Stainless Steel, Teflon..
Posted: 7/7/2011 1:23:37 PM
I have some outstanding anodized aluminum Magnalite GHC pieces, I've owned them for almost 20 years and they're wonderful. The skillets are well seasoned, and the biggest pot makes the crispest popcorn anybody has ever tried.
To cook acidic stuff then it needs to come out of the aluminum after cooking.
If you have any of these and you feel they are unsafe, please send them to me!! Thanks, , ,
 Bodhicycle
Joined: 6/8/2011
Msg: 88
Cast Iron, Aluminum, Stainless Steel, Teflon..
Posted: 7/16/2011 6:47:12 AM
Anodized aluminum is probably safe UNTIL you cook acidic food in it too often and the chemical resistance that anodizing provides begins to break down. Then you probably begin to get leeching. I use anodized mostly for boiling pasta and the like because it is easier to care for than my cast iron.

Cast iron is the best of all cookware in that it has the best heat transfer profile. You don't get food sticking because areas over electric burner rings or the hottest point of a propane flame. Cast iron dutch ovens carry heat all the way up the side and into a cast iron lid so you get more even cooking for stews, chili etc. Well cured cast iron even resist acids like tomatoes if you don't leave it in them too long.

Most modern cast iron, like Lodge, is textured. You don't get the real non-stick properties that cast iron has provided before teflon was heard of. Unless you are going to get enameled cast iron or spend a fortune, get old cast iron that is not textured. Rusty garage sale or flee market stuff, as long as it is not pitted, can be scrubbed with steel wool to remove rust and recured with a nice long hightemp back on your grill filled close to the top with a mixture of cooking oil and salt. Don't try to handle it until it is cool and keep a fire extinguisher handy just in case.

Stainless transfers heat worse than aluminum of equal thickness. Stainless doesn't "cure" it just gets stained.

Teflon is for eggs. Buy cheap, never use over more than medium heat. never put any metal, not even a fork in them, and throw them away when they get the first scratch or discolored. Or keep a cast iron egg pan that shines like a black mirror. I sometimes see my Grandmother's face in mine.
 Bossenova
Joined: 7/9/2011
Msg: 89
Cast Iron, Aluminum, Stainless Steel, Teflon..
Posted: 7/16/2011 10:56:30 AM
I use them all. Cast Iron for broiling steaks chicken and only sausage gravy for biscuits and gravy. Teflon for eggs, pancakes,fritters and such and steel for sauces, gravys and what have you.
I guess I dont use much aluminum, unless Im in a pinch or camping but even then cast iron.
 Bodhicycle
Joined: 6/8/2011
Msg: 90
Cast Iron, Aluminum, Stainless Steel, Teflon..
Posted: 7/16/2011 11:34:12 AM
Steak Au poivre: Same as pan cooked steak above, but first, crush black peppercorns with the side of your cast iron dutch oven(let me see you that with stainless or aluminum, you'll bend and scratch them) then simmer them in safflower or some light oil, even non-virgin olive. Pour off the oil and drain in cheesecloth. Coat both sides with the crushed peppercorns then procees as the pan fried steak from Viper1.

While the steak sets(tented in foil for 10 minutes, let the pan cool to about 25o, just a little too hot to touch the handle comfortable, then deglaze with cognac. turn off heat and add about 3 tblsp butter. let the pan cool as the butter melts about three minutes then stir in heavy cream. Top off with a couple of tblsp of cognac before server over your steak and a bumper hitch for guest if you run out of steak. They won't mind.
 FrankNStein902
Joined: 12/26/2009
Msg: 91
Cast Iron, Aluminum, Stainless Steel, Teflon..
Posted: 7/16/2011 4:35:26 PM

...BUT I love my Paderno cookware made in PEI, Canada.

My Paderno's are going on 10 years and still look like new, with a few of them getting used one average 4 times a week.

IMO
Spend the money on quality cookware then take care of it and you will only have to do it once.





then simmer them in safflower or some light oil, even non-virgin olive. Pour off the oil and drain in cheesecloth. Coat both sides with the crushed peppercorns then procees as the pan fried steak from Viper1.

The only problem I see there is the smoke point of the olive oil being too low and that burnt oil taste transferring to the meat.

I would use clarified butter instead of the oil.
 Bodhicycle
Joined: 6/8/2011
Msg: 92
Cast Iron, Aluminum, Stainless Steel, Teflon..
Posted: 7/17/2011 3:54:38 AM
If its virgin olive oil that has a low smoke point then general pupose olive oil with a higher smoke point must be.....ho oil? trollop oil?

Seriously doesn't clarified butter have a lower smoke point than general purpose olive oil or safflower? The peppercorn treatment was from Alton Brown. I think i have tried it with Canola oil and gen purpose olive oil with no problem. You drain it long enough the oil is't much of an issue. The point is to make the crushed pepper low enough octane you can coat it on thick without adding too much heat.
 FrankNStein902
Joined: 12/26/2009
Msg: 93
Cast Iron, Aluminum, Stainless Steel, Teflon..
Posted: 7/17/2011 10:35:36 AM
Seriously doesn't clarified butter have a lower smoke point than general purpose olive oil or safflower?

With respect to butters it is similar to how it makes a difference if the oils are refined or not.

Safflower oil Unrefined - 225°F
Safflower oil Semirefined - 320°F
Safflower oil Refined - 510°F

Olive oil Extra virgin - 375°F
Olive oil Virgin - 391°F
Olive oil Pomace -460°F
Olive oil Extra light -468°F
Olive oil, high quality (low acidity) Extra virgin - 405°F

Butter - 350°F
Ghee (Indian Clarified Butter) - 485°F
 BlueTeaPot
Joined: 6/25/2011
Msg: 94
Cast Iron, Aluminum, Stainless Steel, Teflon..
Posted: 7/31/2011 10:45:51 PM
Cast iron and stainless steel.

When I moved to NZ I brought my Panderno Cookware from home (Canada) and when I was home in 2010 - I bought more and shipped it back.

Cast iron for other jobs.

I cant remember why I dislike aluminum....
 mrdirty
Joined: 11/24/2007
Msg: 96
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Cast Iron, Aluminum, Stainless Steel, Teflon..
Posted: 4/19/2012 10:26:51 AM
Yeah, I know, this thread is long ago wound up... but for the fun of it I'll answer. Lots of restaurants use cast iron. Order a fajita sometime or a gourmet burger.

Cast iron is the most useful of all, but stainless, enamel or non-stick has their function. and one or more is in my kitchen.
 cajuncooker
Joined: 4/11/2012
Msg: 97
Cast Iron, Aluminum, Stainless Steel, Teflon..
Posted: 4/21/2012 9:07:54 AM
Ok being from the south Hands down Cast Iron. It gives food a different flavor and when i cook things like freid chicken, jambalya and other things it so dosent have the same flavor.
advice on cast iron:
* do not wash it hot
* do not use soap and water or put in the dishwasher.
* to clean cast iron let it cool completely, scrub it out with a scratcher pad or bottle brush type deal ( do not use scowering or sos pads). Put it on the stove with just a little dampness in , turn the burner on low and let it dry. (too damp or wet will crack the pan.) then about once a month or every two week use seasoned peanut oil just a bit coat the cast iron with it, turn it on low, let it dry and take to the cast iron and presto you have a clean seasoned cast iron pot or pan.

For all of those who use cast iron i hope the cleaning advice helped.
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