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 nocalsingledad
Joined: 11/27/2007
Msg: 26
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borderline personality disorder-any info?Page 2 of 16    (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16)
Chasesmom, that list of attributes is simply NOT true. Did you just make that up?

Yes, they CAN be compassionate and empathetic AT TIMES. They can ALSO be abusive 5 seconds later. They tend to whipsaw back and forth. The thing is that most people don't like having a wonderfully compassionate and empathetic partner for most of the day and then dealing with a completely different person at other random times for random periods of time. You never know when what you might say or how they perceive some body language on your part might set one off in a rage (leading one to always "walk on eggshells" around them). Hell, ever wake up at 3am with someone pulling your hair out for something you did in HER DREAM? And because her "intuition is usually pretty good about those things" she decides to start beating on me in my sleep. Yeah, that's really compassionate and empathetic.

They can be silly but that is generally to attract attention. Silly comments made in order to be the center of attention when around people so they dont feel "invisible" in the crowd.

Loyalty as long as you are standing right there with them and as long as they have you "spit good". Once you leave the room or they split you "bad" any loyalty goes right out the window. Again, this is something I LIVED, not something I read in a book. AND I decided to stay ... through five years of therapy.

Your list of attributes are all TEMPORARY attributes that they tend to display in extreme measure just like all the other attributes that they will also display in extreme measure. That is the nature of the disorder. The emotions knob is turned up to 11. The experience a full range of emotions and attributes and they will all manifest with much more intensity than the average persons would.
 nocalsingledad
Joined: 11/27/2007
Msg: 27
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borderline personality disorder-any info?
Posted: 1/1/2008 12:25:50 PM
"high functioning" BPD is "rare" because it is often not diagnosed or is mis-diagnosed. Most often BPD is misdiagnosed as bi-polar disorder as the rages can often mimic mania and there is associated depression. So they are put on medication which can make it easier to manage the extremes and make one more stable but it does not fix the problem. I have never seen a single piece of work ever that even hinted that borderline was biological. But I admit to not having read much on the subject in the last two years. Bi polar disorder, yes, but not borderline. Borderline is suspected of being caused by an early trauma in one's life or growing up in an "invalidating" environment where what one is told and what one experiences are two different things. It tends to happen in families because a borderline parent can cause borderline children or the same trauma impacts all the children similarly. It isnt biological so much as it is "traditional". Children tend to become what they live and they parent how they themselves were parented.
 blue_princess
Joined: 12/24/2007
Msg: 28
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borderline personality disorder-any info?
Posted: 1/1/2008 1:07:09 PM

"high functioning" BPD is "rare" because it is often not diagnosed or is mis-diagnosed.


That is true, but I thought that high-functioning BPD's are the ones that people are most likely to encounter in relationships because if they are functioning well are able to hold down jobs, go to school and things like that. I have heard it referred to as something like "Selective competency" and so these are the people that will do things to you that nobody else would believe because they don't show that side to anyone they are not really close to.



So they are put on medication which can make it easier to manage the extremes and make one more stable but it does not fix the problem. I have never seen a single piece of work ever that even hinted that borderline was biological.


You are partly right, especially since a lot of people with BPD also have co-morbid psychological disorders that the medication can help with, and the medication can't change the way somebody thinks or acts. The environment you grow up in or even one or two extremely stressful events can trigger it in somebody with the predisposition but I have read some things that say that there are differences in the brains of people with BPD and that is why they have such a hard time regulating their emotions. What I have heard about the families is that it usually ends up giving the children some traits of BPD but not necessarily full-blown. I was raised by someone who has many BPD symptoms, and an alcoholic but fortunately I did not develop full-blown BPD. I wound up with major depression, PTSD, and "Personality Disorder NOS".
 nocalsingledad
Joined: 11/27/2007
Msg: 29
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borderline personality disorder-any info?
Posted: 1/1/2008 1:53:33 PM

Psychotherapy is the best treatment for BPD which includes Dialectical behavior therapy which is conducted through individual , group ,and phone counseling , and consists of a skills based approach to teach people how to regulate their emotions , tolerate distress and improve relationships. Medication can't cure BPD , but they can help control problems associated with it.




I absolutely agree 100% with that and will add that it is possible in some cases for drugs to actually get in the way of therapy. The borderline in my life was constantly undergoing changes in her meds both in the medications being prescribed and their dosages. It was nearly impossible for her to keep her emotions regulated when she was constantly hit with changes caused by changing meds. The person prescribing the medications was not the person taking her through DBT. She finally went to a different doctor who took her off all the meds but one. She made more progress in the following three months than she had made in the past 5 years, though coming off the meds did require hospitalization.
 Argentum Crinis Philogus
Joined: 4/3/2007
Msg: 30
borderline personality disorder-any info?
Posted: 1/1/2008 2:09:02 PM
According to the most recent summary publications from the National Institute of Health:
Borderline personality disorder (BPD)

Alternative Names
Personality disorder - borderline

Definition Return to top

Borderline personality disorder is a condition characterized by impulsive actions, mood instability, and chaotic relationships.

Causes Return to top

Personality disorders are chronic patterns of behavior that impair relationships and work. The cause of borderline personality disorder (BPD) is unknown. People with BPD are impulsive in areas that have a potential for self-harm, such as drug use, drinking, and other risk-taking behaviors.

Risk factors for BPD include abandonment issues in childhood or adolescence, sexual abuse, disrupted family life, and poor communication within the family. This personality disorder tends to occur more often in women and among hospitalized psychiatric patients.

Symptoms Return to top

Relationships with others are intense and unstable, swinging wildly from love to hate and back again. People with BPD will engage in frantic efforts to avoid real or imagined abandonment.

BPD patients may also have uncertainties about their identity or self-image. They tend to see things in terms of extremes, either all good or all bad. Such people also typically view themselves as victims of circumstance and take little responsibility for themselves or their problems.

Other symptoms include:

* Frequent displays of inappropriate anger
* Recurrent acts of crisis such as wrist cutting, overdosing, or self-mutilation
* Feelings of emptiness and boredom
* Intolerance of being alone
* Impulsiveness with money, substance abuse, sexual relationships, binge eating, or shoplifting

Exams and Tests Return to top

Personality disorders are diagnosed based on psychological evaluation and the history and severity of the symptoms.

Treatment Return to top

Self-destructive behavior can be changed in social and therapeutic environments such as group therapy. Peer reinforcement of appropriate behavior may be more successful than one-on-one counseling because difficulties with authority figures often prevent learning in such situations. Group therapy can also be helpful in modifying specific impulsive behaviors.

Medications can help to level mood swings and to treat depression or other disorders which may accompany this condition.

Outlook (Prognosis) Return to top

Borderline personality disorder has a poor outlook because noncompliance with treatment is common.

Possible Complications Return to top

* Drug abuse
* Suicide attempts
* Eating disorders
* Depression

When to Contact a Medical Professional Return to top

Call your health care provider if you or your child is has symptoms suggestive of borderline personality disorder.

Update Date: 11/15/2006

Updated by: Paul Ballas, D.O.,

As a therapist with experience in the field, this is one of the most difficult disorders with which to work. Since health insurance seldom cover Axis II disorders, there is usually some co-morbidity at Axis I so BPD treatment can be incorporated. There are also similarities in the different personality disorders that can be confusing and may result in moving through different diagnoses as more data is gleaned from the client and the client's circle of family, friends, and associates.

I have had some very uncomfortable experiences with some clients with this disorder and have in the past terminated clients and referred them to other clinicians due to their violations of agreed upon boundaries.

Maintaining a healthy relationship with an someone with BPD that is untreated is at best, miserble and at worst, dangerous, physically and mentally. Even a relationship with someone who has this disorder and is compliant with treatment will be a an ongoing challenge. Walking into such a relationship is a poor odds bet under the best of circumstances and only someone who can afford the loss should roll the dice.

All humans deserve love and at the same time, not at the expense of someone else's happiness.

Best of luck.

ACP
 Ravenstar66
Joined: 8/27/2007
Msg: 31
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borderline personality disorder-any info?
Posted: 1/1/2008 2:46:45 PM
I feel for people who HAVE BPD. It must be very painful. However.. it is NOT biological. It is a disorder of the PERSONALITY and there is no cure, only treatment of the symptoms. Although in some instances antidepressants can help. It is treated by LONG TERM therapy with the very few psychotherapists who are willing to take on the personality disordered. Not many are familiar, nor have the proper training. The others are not willing to take on BPD, for many reasons..it doesn't respond well to treatment...mainly because one of the hallmark symptoms is an inability to take responsibility.. projection and denial make it very tough to treat.. there are cognitive distortions and disocciation also. Also many medical plans will not pay for treatment... not the long term that is required, unless the BPD in question is so low functioning as to be hospitalized. Many BPD's are high functioning... and would sooner commit suicide than accept that anything is wrong with them.. that's part of the disorder. Also if NPD is also part of the disorder they frequently will not see a need for treatment.

BPD has many faces...some are so messed up they can not function in society, and cause great damage to all they come in contact with...at the other end are those who seem "normal" to everyone but those very close to them. All in all the very first thing is a problem with relationships. It is THE hallmark of the disorder.

Some people on the Nook (it has a different name now) stay with their BPD spouses if the spouse commits to long term therapy... but frequently a relationship can not survive the stress BPD puts on it...and unfortunately children suffer the worse. I have heard too many horror stories from those who grew up with a parent with BPD. Children are just not capable of defending themselves from the emotional turmoil of BPD's.

There is a site also for those with BPD, who wish to be, or are in recovery. It's a great site. And a couple more I found.

http://pub69.ezboard.com/bashrisen40890
http://p207.ezboard.com/bwithoutborders5000
http://www.middle-path.org/

No one DESERVES a relationship...a relationship is one of those "perks". It's a bonus, not a right.

I wish all, Non's and Bpd's, happiness, health and love for the New Year!
 nocalsingledad
Joined: 11/27/2007
Msg: 32
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borderline personality disorder-any info?
Posted: 1/1/2008 5:19:15 PM

Are those woman suffering with borderline personality disorders more inclined to be affected or more dramatic pms which may be viewed as PMDD?


My ex had horrible PMS to the extent that I used to dread her periods. The week before her period would just be terrible to live through sometimes. They were a time of nearly constant rages and strife of some sort and then as soon as she started to bleed, it would all melt away and she would be fine again. Those were the times that objects would be thrown through windows, furniture thrown around, I would be kicked out of the house or chased around with a knife. Believe me, it can be quite frightening. But yeah, I can see how bpd could be misdiagnosed as pmdd (or vice versa) in some cases or a person could suffer from both.

When she went on the Mirena IUD the PMS raging dropped considerably but she still had the other traits.
 blue_princess
Joined: 12/24/2007
Msg: 33
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Posted: 1/1/2008 7:37:00 PM
I think having BPD or any other personality disorder/mental illness can worsen PMS symptoms. Nocalsingledad, I think that is WAYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY beyond PMDD but the hormonal changes probably greatly increased her rage.

Sheesh, I thought I was bad. I don't take tricyclic birth control so that the ranging hormone levels don't worsen my depression, but even so a little while before my period and the first couple of days into it I cry or get angry over smaller things than I normally would and have a very hard time calming myself down, and sometimes even have suicidal thoughts. But at least that's all inward stuff that I have to deal with and am not doing to anybody else!
 dontmakecookies
Joined: 11/1/2006
Msg: 34
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borderline personality disorder-any info?
Posted: 1/2/2008 9:06:05 AM
princess leigh... there's not such thing as "personality disorder" you lost a word in there somewhere.

OP... run

fast


unfortunately it is one of the most difficult and troubling problems in all of psychiatry.


Take this seriously. BPD is perhaps even more troubling than psychopathy. The BPD, in general, does not see that they have a problem. They are untreatable because primarily they don't want to be (at least not on a consistent basis and not for their entire symptom set). In fact, BPD has been called a feminine manifestation of psychopathy.

again... run.

unless of course, you want to live like post 8 describes.
 cncgandolf
Joined: 7/29/2007
Msg: 35
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Posted: 1/2/2008 9:15:38 AM
From prior post
I don't recall speaking of a "total recovery". I'm saying the person can be treated....and live a life. I'm very sorry that your special person was so sick that treatment wasn't enough. And you are correct - the person who is sick has to do most of the work, not the spouse.


From ACP post:
Borderline personality disorder has a poor outlook because noncompliance with treatment is common.


Since I run a sober living home I live with this issue on a daily basis. I often talk to people who have gone in for detox and are leaving treatment centers on a c0ktale (misspelled to prevent ***) of mood altering drugs. I was discussing with one woman yesterday how the anti-anxiety medicines in her list of drugs were needed to get her mind to get quiet enough to hear anything that could lead to recovery.

As ACP points out, the issue is with the person who now feels well continuiing to take the drugs or other needed treatments. Not realizing that part of the recovery lies in the mood stabilization from drugs and/or support. Another issue I have faced is p0eople released from centers prior to the coktale being stabilized and so they are not yet stable.

The OPs original question was what can she do about it. One post had a reverse listing ... a joking list saying what to do which was actually the list of what not to do. One hopes everyone who read it realized that. The real answer is that there are support groups for those who choose to stay in relationships with people with various behavioral disorders. All of the -anon groups (Al-Anon being the original, but there are many many more now) are for the friends and families of people with behavioral disorders of many different kinds to learn to live with the effects on you of their behavioral problems.

Recovery is possible. The original Big Book does promise recovery. Step 12 does say "having recovered." However, it also promises relapse for those who do not continue to do the things that lead to recovery. Recovery is also possible for the friends and family of the person who needs help whether the person who needs help seeks help or not; and they can relapse too.

Gandi
 fancynanci
Joined: 8/21/2007
Msg: 36
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borderline personality disorder-any info?
Posted: 1/2/2008 11:24:14 AM
My advice is run. Run fast. I was married to one of those.
 Leigh AKA PL
Joined: 4/20/2006
Msg: 37
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borderline personality disorder-any info?
Posted: 1/2/2008 12:52:30 PM

Thank you for the well-written and thought out post. The sweeping generalizations ("always" and "never") and the bullying of Princess Leia were what I disagreed with


hey chasesmom.... forget it... I am used to it REALLY.... you have to get used to insults and people thinking your worthless..... but I am still here.. to prove SOME people they are wrong and we are worth it.... my fiance has been reading this and is just as upset as I am .... but hey.... some people will never understand the true meaning of love and compassion and till death do us part.... as long as they are happy that is all that matters.... they are perfect and deserve better than someone with a mental illness..... Dave my darling... your right.... forget this thread... it is not worth it.... we are happy and know the truth....... we are INDIVIDUALS.... we are not all that hideous that we can't be loved.... if we were we would be put down like animals.... oh wait... I get the feeling some feel we should.... Tough.... I am not letting my past rule my life... YES I HAVE A LIFE
 sportymatt
Joined: 11/30/2007
Msg: 38
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Posted: 1/2/2008 12:55:52 PM
Hi there,

What does borderline personality disorder consist of - does this guy have severemood swings, or prone to violence?
 dontmakecookies
Joined: 11/1/2006
Msg: 39
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Posted: 1/2/2008 2:58:14 PM
This response is about some general contention on whether borderline personality is medical or mental.

But first I want to say that I didn't read thoroughly enough the thread in my earlier post. I would recommend to anyone I knew to avoid someone who even appeared to have a borderline personality disorder whether diagnosed or not. I don't think anyone said borderlines were unlovable. But, if you were just entering into a relationship with one and discovered this you might be wise to explore options elsewhere for your own health and safety.

That said, if two people are happy and especially if one recognizes their problem perhaps they can have a sustainable relationship. I've seen older borderlines who made great strides over time with their disorder. I wouldn't wish what they were like on their way there on anyone though. And it's very rare. Maybe sometimes one personality type can mesh with a borderline (boderline loving disorder?) and the needs feed each other such that they're happy. And if they're happy that's all that counts because many borderlines only harm their immediately closest companions. So good luck to those who are happy. But please, there is a wealth of information out there that clearly states that borderlines in stable relationships are rare. Arguing that, because your case is wonderful, that the bulk of the evidence is wrong is myopic. In fact, you should know better than anyone the difficulties of being in such a relationship and should caution people about embarking on that path.

Back to the original purpose... There is no such thing as a distinction between a mental condition and a medical one. They are all medical. Some mental conditions may not have a physiological cause (most) but that does not make them any less medical.

Furthermore, ALL mental conditions will have physiological manifestations. It's likely we could find signature brain chemistries for most. But, if brain chemistry is not the root cause then doing things to balance the brain chemistry will not find a cure. Too many people mistake finding a physiological correlate of a medical condition is the cause of the medical condition. If I came in with a broken leg from a skiing accident my Dr. would advice me not to do whatever led to the problem. He would not tell me that the cause of my broken bone was a broken bone.

Depression is the classic case. All types of major depression have a signature brain chemistry. Some forms of depression, most notably post-partum, also likely have a physiological cause. But not all have such a cause. Many depression sufferers are not cured by drug therapy. Nevertheless, they are given it anyway because it relieves their symptoms and allows them to get into a state of mind where therapy can be more effective. That's the most common form of depression. There is a high relapse rate for those cured with drug therapy and who did not get mental therapy unless there is a known antecedent physically traumatic event such as difficult child birth or amputation (or puberty).

Just because it does not have a physiological cause that we can easily see does not make it any less of an illness outside the control of the victim. Look at phobias for a very simple example. Someone doesn't just decide to not be afraid of spiders (or to be afraid in the first place). It is governed by fundamental learning principles that have a physiological basis. Nevetherless, it isn't a drug that cures it but careful therapy and work. The sight of the spider generates real physiological neurochemical responses in the body. Now try to stretch from that example and imagine trying to deal with a maladaptive thought pattern that by nature is designed to prevent you from dealing with it (such as BPD or psychopathy). It's not simple to understand your own freedom of choice in that case. It's certainly not easy to take advantage of it. So I certainly have sympathy with anyone in such a situation.

Drawing these medical and mental distinctions is wrong. Drawing physiological and mental ones is pointless because for every thought you have there is a physiological correlate in your body. If you have a lot of the same thoughts all the time and they deviate from thoughts of the normal population then you are going to have chronic neurochemical differences in your brain that are abnormal. That doesn't mean either one is causal to the chronic problem. But just because the cause may be mental, or the manifestation mental, does not make it any less medical.

(and to the person who said psychiatrists were a joke because they didn't catch patients who lied... I suppose all of medicine is a joke then because a large number of diseases and disorders don't have symptoms easily observable in the doctor's office. A similar study to that one cited could have fooled an orthopedic specialist about back pain, or a gastroenterologist could be fooled about ileitis. All of medicine relies on honest patients for proper diagnoses. I guess those professions are jokes too.)
 cncgandolf
Joined: 7/29/2007
Msg: 40
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Posted: 1/2/2008 6:02:22 PM

Gandi, are you forgetting from "How it works"


Nope, didn't forget it. Very familiar with it. However, you did not include the part in my post about relapsing. Those who are consititutionally capable of being honest with themselves and who have thoroughly worked the program do upon reaching step 12 "having recovered" ... not in recovery. Those who say "in recovery" are misrepresenting and misquoting the Big Book.

On the other hand, I know people who have been in AA for many years, one comes to mind who has over 28 years, who have repeated year 1 over and over and never "thorougly worked" the program. The one I am thinking of has been dry all 28 years, but is still very dysfunctional. I think of them as being like a heart by-pass patient who has recovered from the surgery but who is not thoroughly following the program the person's doctor has set out for them.

Congratulations on your long-term sobriety. May you have many more one-days-at-a-time without a relapse.
 Leigh AKA PL
Joined: 4/20/2006
Msg: 41
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borderline personality disorder-any info?
Posted: 1/3/2008 11:42:07 AM

Princess: As I've already stated , reading some of the comments on this thread confirm my belief that most people don't understand or know enough about BPD or Mental Disorders in general. They seem to have the run away fast mentality or believe that people that suffer from Mental Illness cannot love , be loved, lead normal lives, or be involved in relationships. The fact is , people that suffer from BPD can have successful lives in every aspect as long as they are with someone who understands their illness and is willing to support them in their healing process. Good luck to you and let no-one sway you away from your beliefs and you healing. Peace


well said and thankyou....

look... I have never said it is easy living with someone like me.... but not impossible... I am very loyal and loving.... hate liars and betrayers..... we all have faults.... ALL OF US.... some just admit to it.... some will never... no matter what their faults.
 junipermoon
Joined: 3/1/2006
Msg: 42
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Posted: 2/25/2008 2:25:15 PM
does anyone know if a person with bpd would experience delusional thinking ~ imagining theirself as capable of performing all manner of heroic feats? and bragging endlessly about it?

i do wonder about this disorder. and suppose someone presents major symptoms of it, but refuses to acknowledge any problem at all, let alone one so serious?
 junipermoon
Joined: 3/1/2006
Msg: 43
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borderline personality disorder-any info?
Posted: 3/9/2008 2:13:02 PM
but couldn't the tendency of the emotions to override cognitive thinking lead to a belief in the grandiosity of self? (if they feel it acutely enough, it must be true).

and the identity disturbance, if pronounced enough, couldn't that lead to delusional thinking?

and suppose, that, in addition, the individual heard voices and had difficulty distinguishing between dream and waking states. that doesn't really fit the bpd model, but, it could happen concurrently, yes?
 junipermoon
Joined: 3/1/2006
Msg: 44
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Posted: 3/9/2008 4:55:29 PM
prairie, i hope you get to feeling better. i appreciate you taking the time and energy to respond.

well, i noticed first the instability in relationships. then the other stuff emerged: the frantic reaction at the thought of abandonment, a continually readjusting of the self-image, heavy drinking, suicidal thoughts, extreme reactivity and rage and alternately idolizing and villianizing of others. this, along with the delusions, hearing voices and confusion about dream and waking states, really gave me pause. in my work, i meet a lot of people with serious issues, but i'd never encountered anyone quite so disturbed.

while it no longer has a place in my life, i'd like to recognize it if i come across it again in someone else. and i'd like to understand it in order to help clients in the future.


My ex only served a few months of non-combat military duty, but lied about being an officer in combat with very convincing stories, until a veteran's group he joined ratted him out, thank God.


did he honestly believe this? or did he consciously lie? how did he react when the truth came out?
 junipermoon
Joined: 3/1/2006
Msg: 45
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Posted: 3/11/2008 6:53:54 AM

If you get the unconscious kind, watch out. Make sure you set limits with this person.


exactly what i mentioned earlier. if the borderline refused to acknowledge that they have a problem, they will never get the help they need. and setting your own limits and boundaries results in rage and abuse thrown at you. throw in a drinking problem and you have a person who will never heal. sad, really.


Energetically, the borderline person will feel a knot of energy in their gut that is there at all times.


so, do you suggest chakra work? yoga?

please elaborate. thanx.
 junipermoon
Joined: 3/1/2006
Msg: 46
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Posted: 3/11/2008 7:26:21 PM

I am a diagnosed bi-polar AND borderline personality disorder. It is no walk in the park. I won't lie to you and tell you that I haven't put just a few men through hell and back in relationships. However, there is hope.


what do you think has to happen before the bpd will admit they have a problem and seek help?
 junipermoon
Joined: 3/1/2006
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Posted: 3/12/2008 7:24:11 PM

I myself have a daughter that has mood disorder which has been to be said as bi-polar.Contrary to belief with the medication can be treated.


you can treat bipolar disorder with meds and i understand it can have a truly beneficial effect.

but when you talk about borderline, apparently the same doesn't apply. the behavioral therapies mentioned earlier may help. but ~ bottom line ~ the person with bpd has to admit to the problem and seek help. that seems like the sticking point with a lot of these people.
 junipermoon
Joined: 3/1/2006
Msg: 48
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Posted: 3/13/2008 6:08:10 PM

Juniper, that bottom line applies to anyone with any problem, not just the BPD.


i agree 100%. i phrased it the way i did because this thread concerns bpd. but, yes, alcohol addiction, bipolar and anything else along those lines will only improve if the individual admits the problem and seeks to manage it.
 nocalsingledad
Joined: 11/27/2007
Msg: 49
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Posted: 3/14/2008 8:24:58 PM
My partner of 11 years was BPD, mis-diagnosed bi-polar and major depression before finally being diagnosed BPD after her second involuntary commit. It was the most difficult experience of my life.

When I first read about it after her diagnosis it was actually a great relief because then suddenly a lot of things that made absolutely no sense suddenly gained some context. She underwent DBT for several years but she had a psychiatrist who was convinced he could fix it chemically and he kept adjusting her medications and dosages which prevented her from ever having a stable foundation. As soon as she would get used to some new medication regime, he would change it and things would be off-kilter again for a while.

I really hate to say this because it sounds cruel but if I had it all to do over again, I would take the kids and run. I couldn't, though, because we were unmarried and an unmarried father has practically no rights unless she is a direct physical danger to the kids. But I would have taken the kids and run and let the court sort it out. My lawyer at the time advised that but I decided to try to stay. It can be done if one has an infinite amount of patience and training in how to handle the situation. Otherwise, I wonder if my staying really made things worse.
 nocalsingledad
Joined: 11/27/2007
Msg: 50
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Posted: 3/15/2008 10:07:21 AM
It really frustrates me that people are still injecting bi-polar into the discussion because bi-polar disorder has absolutely nothing whatsoever to do with BPD, it is a completely different problem that is treated in a completely different way.

And I can't count the number of times I have gotten into a conversation about BPD and someone pipes up about bi-polar disorder. It is like talking about the measles and someone pipes up that their kid had the mumps once.

Folks, borderline and bi-polar are not related in any way, they are completly different issues.
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