Plentyoffish dating forums are a place to meet singles and get dating advice or share dating experiences etc. Hopefully you will all have fun meeting singles and try out this online dating thing... Remember that we are the largest free online dating service, so you will never have to pay a dime to meet your soulmate.
     
Show ALL Forums  > British Columbia  > Do you eat farm salmon?      Home login  
 AUTHOR
 livnitup
Joined: 12/13/2006
Msg: 26
Do you eat farm salmon?Page 2 of 5    (1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
Yes it's inferior, blander, paler ( There is dye in the food to give the otherwise pale Atlantic Salmon flesh some 'pink', harvest stage, not hatchery.)


See this is the kind of propaganda I'm talking about. It's not dye at all, it's called astaxanthin or canthaxanthin and it is given to the fish at every stage because it is a vital nutrient for sustaining the fish's health. It is a carotenoid similar to carotene (what makes you turn orange if you eat too many carrots) This nutrient is naturally occuring in lots of food that wild fish feed on which gives them their pigment. The variation in colour of wild salmon most may find from the farmed has nothing to do with how the fish was reared or fed but has plenty to do with the species of fish you are eating. Ie: sockeye salmon is the most red in colour. It's a genetic thing, this fish uptakes this nutrient better than others. "White" Chinook which are prized and rare have a genetic defect where they do not uptake the pigment.
It is given during the brood stage (note that the broodstock are not even harvested for consumption) and during the hatchery stage as well even though the fish's complexion does not change colour with it. If that was just a dye I would say that's a waste of money!

Do your homework people - propaganda! Need I say it again?
 bcboy72
Joined: 3/16/2005
Msg: 27
view profile
History
Do you eat farm salmon?
Posted: 5/1/2007 8:50:35 PM

what? am I not allowed now to have a preference as to 'wild' or 'farmed'?


Lol Fluffy...what I was meaning was that those very reasons..pinker, meatier, and fishier taste...would probably propel me to eat that very type..as I eat fish, because I want it to taste like fish...if I wanted it to taste like chicken...well...that is another thread.

*dinner is on the stove*
 Quadly
Joined: 8/5/2005
Msg: 28
Do you eat farm salmon?
Posted: 5/1/2007 9:11:55 PM
Just my opinion(s) I'm not a scientist. I've just worked from the water, to the table and made some observations along the way.

I've been out of the whole fishing gig for years, except as a DFO observer.

I was told that (in layman's terms) Atlantic salmon have a paler flesh than the Pacific they are competing with at market. Therefore there were more of these carotenoids administered in the feed than absolutly necessary for life. This is (if true) not damming at all, just .. interesting.
As fishermen, we just called it Redfeed. Albacore tuna oil content/flesh pigmentation change slightly according to diet also.

White springs were always the lowest price paid to the fisherman, compared to red ones. If they are prized now, it's a very recent devolopment and/or some creative value added marketing.

Wild salmon are an incredibly valuable resource.
To me an Atlantic is a McFish.
I just choose not to eat it.

I'll refrain from going post al and stay away from lice and Atlantics in the rivers...That's not propaganda, I was there.
I don't eat lice either.
Friends?

Edit, if I'm wrong, someone will always let me know..lol
 vancouver40
Joined: 8/13/2005
Msg: 29
Do you eat farm salmon?
Posted: 5/1/2007 9:34:28 PM
"White" Chinook which are prized and rare

i guess "rare" might depend on where a person lives and what season they happen to be fishing.
i have no idea what of the numbers of white chinooks are in the rest of the province but i do know they're abundant in the fraser river system. in fact what i've found is that the red chinook are much rarer than the whites in that area. the reds generally come up the fraser and vedder from june to august while the whites are usually in the system during september to november (give or take a month for each). i've found the reds to be a smaller run, as well as a smaller fish, on average ranging around 20-25 lbs, while the whites are more plentiful and have a higher average weight.

the average size of the whites might be what makes them more prized but in my experience they're definitely not more rare than the reds.... i'm not sure what other people's experiences have been as to the rarity of the white chinook..

as a side note, i personally prefer the taste of a red chinook over a white, but i'd willingly eat a sloppy old chum salmon, that has come to the end of it's wild life, before i'd stick a fork into a farmed salmon.
 whodeletedme
Joined: 11/26/2005
Msg: 30
Do you eat farm salmon?
Posted: 5/1/2007 9:49:59 PM
Never thought about it before but always wondered WHY sometimes the sushi I ordered was too soft and almost mushy,... NOW I'll ask.

Knowledge is power.
 BRIANiac
Joined: 3/21/2006
Msg: 31
Do you eat farm salmon?
Posted: 5/1/2007 10:00:50 PM
Don't care. My question is "does it taste good?"
 livnitup
Joined: 12/13/2006
Msg: 32
Do you eat farm salmon?
Posted: 5/1/2007 11:19:34 PM

I'll refrain from going post al and stay away from lice and Atlantics in the rivers...That's not propaganda, I was there.
I don't eat lice either.
Friends?


Yes of course, don't take anything to heart..it was just one good example of how the media totally contorts things.
But since you mentioned it, there are some interesting stories about sea lice infestations on the BC Ministry (of whatever they are this week) website that are from pre-aquaculture days. The media and the environmentalists aren't chomping at the bit to tell you all about that either. Or that the Broughton Pink Run was an artificially introduced run into that area in the mid 1900's and the population never actually amounted to anything much until the 90's which is after salmon farming began in the area. Not to mention the Atlantics that were purposefully introduced several times into the Pacific ecosystem, though never took. I wonder how a farmed fish would survive to spawn (with a same species partner) when it has never had to actually hunt for it's food, especially when less than 3% of wild fish actually make it to spawning grounds (I can't remember what the odds are but they are almost nil). They are actually farming a whole lot more Chinook and Coho these days to combat the issue of possible escapes mating, which in theory sounds like a good idea but I actually think it's worse. The probability of those fish finding eggs of the same species to fertilize increases (or becomes scientifically probable at least) and you have a degradation of the species.

There's lot's of info out there, but like everything else, if you want all the facts you have to search them out instead of just taking other people's word for it that's all. I'm more anti media than anti wild salmon - really!
 Rizladude
Joined: 6/7/2006
Msg: 33
Do you eat farm salmon?
Posted: 5/2/2007 4:06:35 AM
I don't really care, what really matters to me if the damn fish is fresh.
 ÐÎLLÏGÃF™
Joined: 12/24/2006
Msg: 34
Do you eat farm salmon?
Posted: 5/2/2007 12:15:51 PM
I worked in the fishing industry for a number of years...fishing and in the canner..
I also live in a fishing village....Steveston village..


nope I do not buy or promote Farm raised fishing...
 dook
Joined: 12/8/2005
Msg: 35
Do you eat farm salmon?
Posted: 5/2/2007 12:44:25 PM
I always ask before ordering any salmon if it is wild. I will not eat farmed, nor do I support sea based farming of it. My buddy used to tend net anchors on the sunshine coast "Hey Simon" And he told me just what was piled underneath the nets. Also, how there wouldn't be much living around the nets because of scavengers.
If it were land/tank based I wouldn't have a problem with it per se. You can eat all you want....not me.
 Walts
Joined: 5/7/2005
Msg: 36
view profile
History
Do you eat farm salmon?
Posted: 5/2/2007 6:35:34 PM
If it were land/tank based I wouldn't have a problem with it per se


And this is my biggest beef with the whole fish farming industry and the agencies that are in control of it. The DFO is in charge of our fisheries(not saying they do a great job at it either), but they are federal. The provincial goverment has given these business' the right to use our ocean, estuaries, etc for the use of mass producing a food product, because they are in charge of the farming end.Their reasoning is that the tides "flush" out all the "bad" remnants of their farming and there is nothing left behind to worry about. Uh huh Think pig or chicken farms here for a moment and what has to be cleaned out of these buildings daily. NOW, tell me they are not doing any harm to our enviroment and the ecosystem.
And the examples of what hatcheries feed their fish(in tanks, on ground or away from the natural source of their water supply I might add) has very little to do with feeding a two or three old fish in pens situated in a bay of an ocean.Hatcheries RELEASE their fish within a year of hatching back into the natal river systems, so that they can learn to feed, survive, go out to the ocean, grow, and then come back to their rivers. The fish that are being fed in farms are NOT being fed the same PELLETS as those fry in the hatcheries. Farm fish are fed to GROW fast and as cheaply as possible so they can be bonked and sent to the stores. Again, think pig and chicken farms here and how they are fed and kept confined so they don't waste energy, and body mass. They have food thrown in front of them constantly, as are the farmed fish. And every missed pellet goes a floating to the bottem of our OCEAN, not a tank. Therein lies one of my biggest problems.
I'm sure in some period of time we will have found out what these farms are doing to our enviroment, kinda like what we are witnessing with the global warning that all the naysayers said was'nt happening in the last 25 years. I just don't think it takes a rocket scientist to figure out that these farms are just playing with something that we can't fix later on.
Oh, to livinitup, I have personally caught 2 (that would be TWO) atlantics in our BC rivers. Of course, they could NEVER survive in the wild here nor spawn with any of our natives. I could give you some names of a couple Island rivers that people actually witnessed more than one pair of escapees doing their thing on their reds. Who knows if they were succesful??? But they sure were trying.
Our enviroment is going thru enough changes because of humans and their greed. I just think we should really start doing a little more before letting industries and business' keep adding to the fire all because of $$$$$$$$$$$$$$.
 Carrie127
Joined: 10/12/2004
Msg: 37
Do you eat farm salmon?
Posted: 5/2/2007 8:07:34 PM
Interesting topic......I've been working in the fish farming industry for 10 yrs now and I think when it all comes down to it most people r uneducated about the whole industry of farmed salmon. This issue has been going on for yrs and probably will for many more, Like Walts said time to start leeting industriesand business keep adding to the fire because there is money to be made.
 livnitup
Joined: 12/13/2006
Msg: 38
Do you eat farm salmon?
Posted: 5/2/2007 8:38:32 PM

I have personally caught 2 (that would be TWO) atlantics in our BC rivers. Of course, they could NEVER survive in the wild here nor spawn with any of our natives. I could give you some names of a couple Island rivers that people actually witnessed more than one pair of escapees doing their thing on their reds. Who knows if they were succesful??? But they sure were trying.


Refer to the above point I made about the DFO purposefully rearing Atlantic salmon and releasing them into the wild in hopes of establishing runs here. Were they really escapees or some of the few that actually made it? It is also been scientifically proven by NOAA that Atlantics can't cross-breed with different species.

The only difference between the feed on the farms and the feed in the hatcheries is the size of the food and variations in the amount of the ingredients. Also the same feed used in the Alaskan hatcheries whereby they rear them in freshwater until they are smolts then transfer them to saltwater pens much like the fish farms we are all familiar with and then release them for the fisheries to catch them. I have a harder time with this practice too, again degredation of the species AND same ecological footprint.

And BTW I'm in no way disputing that fish farming leaves an ecological footprint just as the car I drive etc, etc. I just marvel that the environmentalists see it fit to LIE about the rearing practices in order to get their money from the public and other organizations. If the salmon farming community was to LIE about their practices, you can bet it would be smeared all over the media and not in a 2 line retraction on page A16 of the Vancouver Sun. It's really just a matter of principle.

And I'll continue to eat farmed salmon just as I continue to eat farmed everything else.
 who_the_fox
Joined: 1/19/2007
Msg: 39
Do you eat farm salmon?
Posted: 5/2/2007 8:42:51 PM
I don't eat it because I don't like the texture. If I am going to eat salmon it is wild Sockeye.
 Quadly
Joined: 8/5/2005
Msg: 40
Do you eat farm salmon?
Posted: 5/2/2007 10:50:35 PM
Feeling a little Quadly...

Really I'm not fighting here, just throwing out some food for thought...

Sockeye can't be farmed (yet)as far as I know. They don't like the net.


They tried to introduce atlantics here:

From 1905-35 over 8.6 million Atlantics were intentionally introduced to more than 60 Bc lakes and streams.



They are in the rivers, Andy Thompson with the atlantic salmon watch program had a mandate years ago to train first nations and others to swim select rivers with laser sighted spearguns to pull out any atlantics.

They got 2, it was mostly a feel good/make work program.

My buddy Ian, an avid sportsfisherman, caught over 80 Atlantics in one year.. there were 235 caught in the salmon river in 1999. On Hooks, not with nets.
That's where Andy got his fish to disect and come up with his 'otolith mitrostructural analysis'. A test to determine if the fish was farmed/escape or feral..(born in the wild)
The numbers stop at 2002 on the website

I like this one from a salmon farming industry rebuttal to an environmentalist report:


Farmed salmon was never meant to take pressure off wild stocks—wild salmon stocks are not under pressure because the fisheries are well managed. Farmed salmon is meant to supply consumers with a healthy food at a moderate price. If it were not for farmed salmon fewer consumers would have access to this healthy food because the wild catch cannot be increased.


David Suzuki:


One area that has received a great deal of study, is the increase in antibiotic-resistant bacteria in sediment under fish farms


I am not so worried about them colonizing rivers, or the fact that the raw effluent from the 80+ open net pens is about 1 1/2 times more than the city of Victoria dumps into the chuck..365 days a year. At least they are spread out. No big deal, collateral damage.

I wonder though about things like..
Natural diseases occuring sporadically in the low density wild population becoming stronger in the high density, highly medicated and stressed population. These .. superbugs could then wreak havoc among the indiginous, less medicated populations.
Of course ther'll besome report saying it couldn't happen..and yet we hear about avian flu and other weird things?
Fish, to fish, and back to fish isn't so far fetched.. is it?
There is so much more.. but I personally just prefer wild.
edit..ugh edit
 livnitup
Joined: 12/13/2006
Msg: 41
Do you eat farm salmon?
Posted: 5/2/2007 11:16:08 PM

Fish, to fish, and back to fish isn't so far fetched.. is it?


nope it certainly is not.

IMHO I think that there are lot of way as human beings we can stop the threat of antibiotic resistant superbugs, take for example this cold I have. Spread through my family and a couple of friends, I have had this cold for 4 days, same symptoms as the rest - swallowing razorblades, swollen glands, stuffy head etc. I suck it up with some Advil and continue life working, raising two children, dealing with moving, divorce etc. They to go to the clinic and get prescriptions because the doctor tells them they have mono-bronchial-strep-tonsilitis or some alarmist thing like that. Chances are, I will be over this cold just as quickly as they are. It happens about 3 times a year and every time it's the same crap. And it goes in their poop drawer and comes out in the wastewater which eventually ends up in the ocean. Take something, wait 5-7 days and quit running to the doctor for antibiotics every time you have a sore throat.

The good news is, relative to fish farming, that the amount of antibiotics used is far more minute than in conventional terrestrial farming. A licensed veteranarian has to actually write a prescription for administering these meds, as opposed to being fed uncontrolled amounts of meds their entire lifetime as antibiotics are also used as a growth enhancer in other forms of farming. Chances are, the farmed fish you are eating, never even had any at all.
 Cuddly Dudley
Joined: 10/18/2005
Msg: 42
Do you eat farm salmon?
Posted: 5/3/2007 5:38:00 AM
I'm not for or against farmed salmon, and eat both (intentionly if you buy any canned salmon!). I prefer sockeye for fresh though, and don't care if it's smoked salmon.

If you really want to see the difference of farmed fish versus wild, go the trout route. The differences are blatant. That is one farmed fish I will never eat!

BTW, most of the farmed salmon finds it's way into foreign markets, very little finds it's way to our tables in BC from my understanding.
 OOR WILLIE
Joined: 3/10/2007
Msg: 43
Do you eat farm salmon?
Posted: 5/3/2007 6:33:57 AM
Those that eat Farmed Salmon are probably the same wankers that voted for and will vote again the drunk driver who got away scott free !

 Cuddly Dudley
Joined: 10/18/2005
Msg: 44
Do you eat farm salmon?
Posted: 5/3/2007 9:11:12 AM
what has eating farmed salmon got to do with how one votes? Tell me, who allowed them in the first place? Surely you haven't forgotten the other party, have you?

Farmed, wild, it all depends on personal preferences, and also if you buy canned salmon. Mind you, never thought of asking when having sushi...probably cause i rarely have salmon when having sushi
 FluffyPinkCuffs
Joined: 3/18/2005
Msg: 45
Do you eat farm salmon?
Posted: 5/3/2007 9:41:45 AM

Those that eat Farmed Salmon are probably the same wankers that voted for and will vote again the drunk driver who got away scott free !

Im sorry, but thats an ignorant statement without much thought behind it.

Quadly, great thread subject!

With all the input from those in the 'business' and not, there is some very educational information. I know Im grateful for it... maybe it will educate most of us (personally, it has for me) ... and it makes no difference to what your personal preference is... just some food for thought as they say.
 Mountain Lion 1
Joined: 10/25/2006
Msg: 46
view profile
History
Do you eat farm salmon?
Posted: 5/3/2007 1:17:38 PM
don't eat most fish exept for sushy and smoked. Will not have any farm fish knowingly, too many additives in their food, heavy metal in particular.
Same reasons I don't eat much if at all, chicken or turky and get my beef from the open range.
Gooosh, not much wild stuff left to eat.
 OOR WILLIE
Joined: 3/10/2007
Msg: 47
Do you eat farm salmon?
Posted: 5/3/2007 8:23:03 PM

but thats an ignorant statement


Heh Heh ! Guess who voted for that Wannabe Y'All Campbell !

 Pucks
Joined: 10/14/2006
Msg: 48
Do you eat farm salmon?
Posted: 5/3/2007 9:55:16 PM
I have heard the farmed salmon is bad news. I buy the wild salmon in stores but come to think of it i dont ask in a restaurant...Yiikes i should.
 *Dolores*
Joined: 2/28/2006
Msg: 49
Do you eat farm salmon?
Posted: 5/3/2007 10:50:13 PM

Anybody asking what those penned fish eat????

What do you think they are eating besides fish meal/oils, cereals, canola oil, legumes, corn gluten, poultry meal, soybean protein, krill meal? Yes, they do receive some pigment as stated above to provide the pink colour that wild salmon obtain by eating organisms that naturally contain those pigments in the wild - canthaxanthin and astaxanthin, carotenoid pigments.


too many additives in their food, heavy metal in particular.

Fish feed does not contain malachite green or melamine, and imported ingredients such as some raw feed products (ie: fish oils) all need to be under the acceptable concentrations determined by federal regulations regarding metals or organochlorine contaminants (ppm) before they are imported into this country. (This is because they may have been obtained from the waters of countries with poor environmental regulation, or because there are some persistent chlorinated compounds ubiquitous in our environment and are unfortunately in our food chain - the higher the fat/lipid content of an organism, the higher levels of carcinogenic substances such as PCBs or dioxins it may contain.) Canada has some of the highest standards in the world for allowable limits of contaminants in products destined for human consumption.

With regard to antibiotics in feed, I would not entirely agree with the following blanket statement,

Chances are, the farmed fish you are eating, never even had any at all.

In most farming operations, the need for medicated treatment may occur, and if it does, regulations are very clear on withdrawal times for any medicant treatments before harvest and tissue samples are obtained to check for residues by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). It is very true that compared to beef, chicken or pork, drugs are administered only under the supervision of a veterinarian, and rarely prophylacticly. Not only would preventative medication of healthy fish be unnecessary, it would also be very expensive. Good husbandry is the key to keeping farm animals/fish healthy; this means reducing stress and keeping densities low so that they don't get sick and treatment for disease is not required.

This post is getting a little long but I think it's important that people have the correct information with respect to the food they eat. I think I have stayed on topic. If we want to make informed decisions about whether we choose to eat it or not, it starts with being aware of what IT has eaten as bioaccumulation of toxins becomes more of a concern the higher the trophic level we eat at.


I have heard the farmed salmon is bad news

Please do a little research, Pucks. There is fact and there is fiction, and media hype is a business unto itself. It's up to you to do a little footwork if you really want to know. While you're at it, just as a start, have a look at the food production/monitoring practices of your five favourite foods......

The astute comment was made before that people are disconnected from the food chain.....I personally do care about what is in my food and how it is obtained/farmed/grown.
 Pucks
Joined: 10/14/2006
Msg: 50
Do you eat farm salmon?
Posted: 5/3/2007 10:57:18 PM
Tofinogirl, Not interested in researching it or doing footwork on salmon. Geezzz there is so much food that should be investigated and the crap/chemicals they put in most foods nowadays is scary.(aside from the organic ones). I choose to do the best i can with the knowledge i have. I shop regularily at health food stores, buy organic as much as i can and do read a little on healthy eating. That is as far as i am taking it. But thanks for you feedback and your post was interesing and appreciated.
Show ALL Forums  > British Columbia  > Do you eat farm salmon?