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 peaceful nature
Joined: 8/26/2005
Msg: 26
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Healthy Garden FormulaPage 2 of 7    (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)
Thanks , just what I was looking for,Debbie
 roxanne1652
Joined: 5/31/2005
Msg: 27
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gardening
Posted: 3/1/2008 2:30:54 AM
NOW you tell me!!

Thanks alot for the tip; I will pass it along (living on the Cape Fear River, that knowledge will make me the most popular girl on the block!!).

I can already see it; I'll be taking a walk and people will say, "Who IS that "minty-fresh" woman??

Rx
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 28
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gardening
Posted: 3/1/2008 11:20:37 AM
...The first thing I get going in a garden is the Onion plants...and last year I tried a variety called "Candy"...they grow large..like a Sweet Spanish..but also will keep well...am still using some kept in a cool cellar all winter. Successive plantings of lettuce greens- the Mesclun mixes are good...and Spinach is another early plant that I love...Radishes are the easiest thing to grow...but I'll pass on trying to grow Carrots in the spring...Once you've had a carrot that's been frosted....and then mulched over in the fall so you can dig them all winter..you'll know what I mean...Plant them in mid July for a climate like Ohio's...and if you need a guaranteed method of getting them out of the ground..just email me..I've worked out a system. Broccoli, Cabbage and Cauliflower all grow well early...but unless you have a source of some Baccillus Thuringiensis (organic biological worm control)..you might as well forget them..You'll get overrun by the cabbage looper.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 29
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gardening
Posted: 3/2/2008 5:11:50 PM
..Weezy..if you have trouble with your tomato plants being cut off at the soil line right after you plant them...it's caused by a "cutworm"..not a tomatoworm...and the best way to prevent it is with a cutworm collar...nothing but a piece of cardboard..formed in a circle that surrounds the plant. I've even been known to use paper cups that I cut the bottom out of...they are waxed...and don't have to be picked up before next spring in the garden...Next time you have something cut off at the soil line...look for a hole about the size of a pencil somewhere near the cut off plant...that's where the cutworm emerged from.
 psunit
Joined: 10/6/2007
Msg: 30
gardening
Posted: 3/4/2008 6:29:58 PM
I have done cucumbers, tomatoes (roma, yellow, and cherry), basil, chives, parsley, cilantro, green peppers (and red ones too!), lettuce all together in a very limited amount of space. You'd be surprised what I can grow in not a whole lot of space!

One year, I had several different types of tomatoes going and never got a single one because my oldest child can eat them like there is no tomorrow and would eat them as soon as they got ripe, like apples! I felt very deprived but was happy she enjoyed them so much!
 Debbishoe
Joined: 5/1/2007
Msg: 31
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gardening
Posted: 7/20/2008 7:02:38 PM
Until this year, I was a big flowering plant gardener. In January of 08, I became a Vegan. Just made sense to add veggies to my gardens. I have several types of tomatoes, growing radishes, two kind of peppers, two kind of cucumbers, zucchini, beans, eggplant, cantaloupe, watermelon. Not bad for a first time veggie grower. I don't have a large area but some how, so far it's working. The cukes and the zucchini are definitely taking over the garden. I put the melons in a separate space.
 Debbishoe
Joined: 5/1/2007
Msg: 32
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gardening
Posted: 7/20/2008 7:07:22 PM
I'm growing melons for the first time. I read that if you plant radishes near the melons, it keeps the melon worms away. I did plant the radishes, man, they are fast growers. Don't have any melon on the vine yet so I don't know if it works, but at least I'll have radishes.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 33
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gardening
Posted: 7/20/2008 8:05:16 PM
...I've been raising a garden for a looooong time...and still have problems growing melons without spraying them now and then. Sevin will take care of the adult cucumber beetles..(black and yellow striped beetles) and the squash bugs...but you really need to get good coverage for the squash bugs. A spray of elemental copper will help with powdery mildew, and a few other minor fungi...I think maybe the excessive rainfal probably rotted off the roots of those melon plants...and once that happens..nothing is going to help those plants. Maybe a slightly better drained area is in order next year.
...Radishes can be used to mark the rows where you have very slow germinating plants...just toss a radish seed in with the rest of them...and it will always germinate fastest...so you can weed very close with your hoe.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 34
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Healthy Garden Formula
Posted: 7/20/2008 8:12:18 PM
...It's kind of funny...there is a class of chemicals...that are referred to as "Nicotinoids"...because nicotine is part of the active ingredient in them. Who knew Jerry Baker was a chemist?...LOL
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 35
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Healthy Garden Formula
Posted: 7/26/2008 3:29:47 PM
..Whenever I set my bedding plants out to harden off..I set them on the north side of the house..in a large box to limit the amount of wind that will get to them...they're too weak from growing inside to go straight into the wind...and direct sunlight outside will sunburn them if they're not allowed to acclimate for at least a week.

..As far as things you can plant right now..try some carrots, they are the best you'll ever eat if you let them get frosted in the fall. Mulch them with 8-10 inches of leaves..and you can dig them all winter.

..Also..try to start some fall spinach and lettuce...they'll be great into the fall...
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 36
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Healthy Garden Formula
Posted: 7/27/2008 2:04:05 PM
Notchuraverage1..If your first killing frost date is after Oct. 6-10th..then the carrots will work. You need to plant them from seed now...not next week...and place a board over the top of the seed furrow to hold the moisture around the seed..and keep the water from your sprinkler from compacting the soil over the top of it. Remove the board at the end of 7 days..(No more, no less) preferably in the evening..because you will have all these spindly white carrots starting to stick through the soil..and the mid-day sun is hard on them. Do not fertilize these carrots..because it generally causes the carrots to fork..and you're looking for a long deep carrot. And yes..you can get spinach and lettuce to harvest from seed in this amount of time too...but I would start the seeds indoors, (Spinach in particular doesn't work really well in hot soils, so starting them indoors in the shade makes sense.)
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 37
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Healthy Garden Formula
Posted: 7/27/2008 2:12:47 PM
..now she's got me inspired...I did plant my carrots on Friday..and I'm going to go sow some six packs of spinach and lettuce now...LOL

...Thanks...
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 38
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Healthy Garden Formula
Posted: 7/27/2008 2:19:19 PM
..Oh by the way...those parsnips will work the same way as the carrots...you let the frost hit them...and all the sugars that are stored in the leaves will move to the root. They're both biennial plants..so they store their sugars in order to go to seed in the next year. We take advantage of the fact to get the extra sweetness. Red beets will probably work the same way..but if they're spring planted they will usually be much too big and woody by fall...Maybe they can be summer planted...but I'm not sure...I'd use the same method I use with carrots if I did...because constant moisture around the seed is the way to get them to emerge fastest.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 39
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Healthy Garden Formula
Posted: 7/27/2008 2:21:37 PM
..I believe you can start parsnips in the spring..and let them go until frost. Somewhere they have a competition to see how long they can get the parsnip roots to grow...They actually take post hole diggers and dig holes about 4-5 foot deep and fill them with sand and compost to plant in. But the smaller ones you might get from a summer planting would be great to add whole to stews and such.
 odinwoden
Joined: 11/28/2007
Msg: 40
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gardening
Posted: 7/27/2008 3:08:31 PM
Okra, cucumbers watermelons, cherry tomatoes, a few heirloom tomatoes, banana peppers, squash, zucchini.

Okra, cucumbers, watermelon, squash, zucchini, and cherry tomatoes have provided almost more than you can eat.

Banana peppers have provided several peppers. Have not had good luck with the other tomato plants.

Overall it was a success. Growing your own veggies really forces you to eat better. 5-6 cucumbers a week and 15 cherry tomatoes makes you become adept at making salads.

Piles of squash and zucchini forces you to get inventive so you don't waste any.

I'm very sad that the larger tomatoes haven't been so healthy though. That's what I was really looking forward to.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 41
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Healthy Garden Formula
Posted: 12/7/2008 4:15:59 PM
For heaven's sakes Pistols...I just got my first seed catalog the other day..LOL. I've been thinking about ordering some onion seed...I really want to start some early this year so I can get the type onion that I like. I think I will have to start them in late January so they will get some size before transplanting in the garden in April.
 Moonchild51
Joined: 3/11/2007
Msg: 42
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Healthy Garden Formula
Posted: 12/10/2008 3:49:10 PM
Ya know kids? This simply isn't fair! I wanna protest! I am sittin here with snow so far up my hinney in 25 degree weather! Dayum you are all makin me jealous!
Please parcel post some o that fine produce my way will ya?
 Moonchild51
Joined: 3/11/2007
Msg: 43
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Healthy Garden Formula
Posted: 12/10/2008 4:26:59 PM
Now Mr. Mee? I do believe you are teasin me Sah! And sadly, Miss Moon would luv to move on down south where tis warm all the time.
But 25 a heat wave heah? Come now young man! We are not that cold here in the land of ice an snow! Just our planting season for a garden really does not begin untl May!!!
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 44
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Healthy Garden Formula
Posted: 12/22/2008 4:42:54 PM
P&P..sorry I took a while to respond..sometimes I forget I posted something in these threads. I like an onion called "Candy". They seem to be very sweet when grown here in Ohio..and are what they call "day neutral". Meaning they aren't affected by day length like a large Texas Grano, or Vidalia..which are short day onions...or a Walla Walla, or Sweet Spanish..which are long day onions. It has to do with what triggers them to mature..Short day onions are best planted closer to the Equator in the winter (Hence why they use them in the South) and Long day onions are best planted in the North.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 45
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Healthy Garden Formula
Posted: 2/8/2009 8:24:23 PM
It's kind of funny..I just saw a blurb about growing tomatoes in Seattle on one of the PBS gardening shows the other week..and they mentioned it was next to impossible to get good tomatoes there. I believe it was because the cool nights they have make it very difficult for the tomatoes to ripen...they don't have much trouble setting fruit...but the nights are so cold..they don't mature.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 46
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Healthy Garden Formula
Posted: 2/9/2009 12:10:50 PM
...I suppose that Sub Arctic tomato is a determinate type...I'll bet several of the early determinates would be likely candidates. I've grown a tomato called 4th of July for years..Just a couple plants to get an early tomato. They don't grow too big..so wrapping some plastic around a tomato tower would probably give them a real chance of ripening.
 mrgarden
Joined: 3/22/2007
Msg: 47
Garden Time...even here up north
Posted: 2/14/2009 9:54:25 PM
I'm in heaven after finding this thread....I thought I was looking for love on POF, and here I am... a lot more excited about finding fellow gardeners!!

Up here in Western NY, it's also time to plant indoor tomatoes, peppers, herbs, etc. in my temp. greenhouse...i.e., (AKA spare bedroom). I acquired a commercial-sized (20'w x 30'l x 12'h) greenhouse last fall, and hope to have it operational by March 1st. I might even start and sell veggie plants at the local public market.

Among my plans at extending the season of other crops this coming fall/winter, I plan to grow about 6 varieties tomatoes in the g-house to see if I can harvest em thru xmas. Anybody else have experience at extending the veggie season....either before or after the "typical" growing season? With a big greenhouse, I'm open to any/all ideas.

I don't know about you folks, but I can't look forward enough to spring!! My lettuce seed gets planted every year under plastic here by 3/1, even if I have to shovel the snow off my raised beds. The payoff: 1st salads by 4/30

Anyone else getting planting fever ?? GARY
 texasbaby
Joined: 7/21/2005
Msg: 48
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Garden Time...even here up north
Posted: 2/16/2009 11:32:54 AM
Well, in a perfect world, the "one" for me would be another gardening foodie, who lived 20 miles away.
At my house everyone is ready to be outside digging in the dirt. My 7 year old ask me this week-end if it was time to get out our saved seeds to see what we could grow this year.
Here in Texas it really is time ~ I've already seen the first rose bud opening.

tb
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 49
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Garden Time...even here up north
Posted: 2/16/2009 1:02:29 PM
You are so lucky..I want to sniff that rose bud...
..But seriously folks
..I'm wondering about keeping tomato plants growing in a greenhouse until X-mas. I think the commercial growers go through a bunch of natural gas keeping them warm enough to ripen tomatoes. They plant them hydroponically any more..(without soil)..and tie them to the rafters..and then tie them to the strings. I haven't a clue on varieties..but you ought to be able to Google some information on greenhouse production from your local universities.
 Moonchild51
Joined: 3/11/2007
Msg: 50
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Garden Time...even here up north
Posted: 2/16/2009 7:31:02 PM
You all have me envious! We still have mounds of snow and really cold weather here. In the summer, it is difficult to grow things in my yard. I have clay soil. I would have to bring in a lot of dirt to make a veggie garden. I do have an herb bed though and I grow tomatoes in planters. Nothing like a fresh tomato or two from the garden!
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