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 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 34
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Healthy Garden FormulaPage 4 of 7    (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)
...It's kind of funny...there is a class of chemicals...that are referred to as "Nicotinoids"...because nicotine is part of the active ingredient in them. Who knew Jerry Baker was a chemist?...LOL
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 35
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Healthy Garden Formula
Posted: 7/26/2008 3:29:47 PM
..Whenever I set my bedding plants out to harden off..I set them on the north side of the house..in a large box to limit the amount of wind that will get to them...they're too weak from growing inside to go straight into the wind...and direct sunlight outside will sunburn them if they're not allowed to acclimate for at least a week.

..As far as things you can plant right now..try some carrots, they are the best you'll ever eat if you let them get frosted in the fall. Mulch them with 8-10 inches of leaves..and you can dig them all winter.

..Also..try to start some fall spinach and lettuce...they'll be great into the fall...
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 36
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Healthy Garden Formula
Posted: 7/27/2008 2:04:05 PM
Notchuraverage1..If your first killing frost date is after Oct. 6-10th..then the carrots will work. You need to plant them from seed now...not next week...and place a board over the top of the seed furrow to hold the moisture around the seed..and keep the water from your sprinkler from compacting the soil over the top of it. Remove the board at the end of 7 days..(No more, no less) preferably in the evening..because you will have all these spindly white carrots starting to stick through the soil..and the mid-day sun is hard on them. Do not fertilize these carrots..because it generally causes the carrots to fork..and you're looking for a long deep carrot. And yes..you can get spinach and lettuce to harvest from seed in this amount of time too...but I would start the seeds indoors, (Spinach in particular doesn't work really well in hot soils, so starting them indoors in the shade makes sense.)
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 37
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Healthy Garden Formula
Posted: 7/27/2008 2:12:47 PM
..now she's got me inspired...I did plant my carrots on Friday..and I'm going to go sow some six packs of spinach and lettuce now...LOL

...Thanks...
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 38
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Healthy Garden Formula
Posted: 7/27/2008 2:19:19 PM
..Oh by the way...those parsnips will work the same way as the carrots...you let the frost hit them...and all the sugars that are stored in the leaves will move to the root. They're both biennial plants..so they store their sugars in order to go to seed in the next year. We take advantage of the fact to get the extra sweetness. Red beets will probably work the same way..but if they're spring planted they will usually be much too big and woody by fall...Maybe they can be summer planted...but I'm not sure...I'd use the same method I use with carrots if I did...because constant moisture around the seed is the way to get them to emerge fastest.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 39
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Healthy Garden Formula
Posted: 7/27/2008 2:21:37 PM
..I believe you can start parsnips in the spring..and let them go until frost. Somewhere they have a competition to see how long they can get the parsnip roots to grow...They actually take post hole diggers and dig holes about 4-5 foot deep and fill them with sand and compost to plant in. But the smaller ones you might get from a summer planting would be great to add whole to stews and such.
 odinwoden
Joined: 11/28/2007
Msg: 40
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gardening
Posted: 7/27/2008 3:08:31 PM
Okra, cucumbers watermelons, cherry tomatoes, a few heirloom tomatoes, banana peppers, squash, zucchini.

Okra, cucumbers, watermelon, squash, zucchini, and cherry tomatoes have provided almost more than you can eat.

Banana peppers have provided several peppers. Have not had good luck with the other tomato plants.

Overall it was a success. Growing your own veggies really forces you to eat better. 5-6 cucumbers a week and 15 cherry tomatoes makes you become adept at making salads.

Piles of squash and zucchini forces you to get inventive so you don't waste any.

I'm very sad that the larger tomatoes haven't been so healthy though. That's what I was really looking forward to.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 41
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Healthy Garden Formula
Posted: 12/7/2008 4:15:59 PM
For heaven's sakes Pistols...I just got my first seed catalog the other day..LOL. I've been thinking about ordering some onion seed...I really want to start some early this year so I can get the type onion that I like. I think I will have to start them in late January so they will get some size before transplanting in the garden in April.
 Moonchild51
Joined: 3/11/2007
Msg: 42
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Healthy Garden Formula
Posted: 12/10/2008 3:49:10 PM
Ya know kids? This simply isn't fair! I wanna protest! I am sittin here with snow so far up my hinney in 25 degree weather! Dayum you are all makin me jealous!
Please parcel post some o that fine produce my way will ya?
 Moonchild51
Joined: 3/11/2007
Msg: 43
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Healthy Garden Formula
Posted: 12/10/2008 4:26:59 PM
Now Mr. Mee? I do believe you are teasin me Sah! And sadly, Miss Moon would luv to move on down south where tis warm all the time.
But 25 a heat wave heah? Come now young man! We are not that cold here in the land of ice an snow! Just our planting season for a garden really does not begin untl May!!!
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 44
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Healthy Garden Formula
Posted: 12/22/2008 4:42:54 PM
P&P..sorry I took a while to respond..sometimes I forget I posted something in these threads. I like an onion called "Candy". They seem to be very sweet when grown here in Ohio..and are what they call "day neutral". Meaning they aren't affected by day length like a large Texas Grano, or Vidalia..which are short day onions...or a Walla Walla, or Sweet Spanish..which are long day onions. It has to do with what triggers them to mature..Short day onions are best planted closer to the Equator in the winter (Hence why they use them in the South) and Long day onions are best planted in the North.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 45
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Healthy Garden Formula
Posted: 2/8/2009 8:24:23 PM
It's kind of funny..I just saw a blurb about growing tomatoes in Seattle on one of the PBS gardening shows the other week..and they mentioned it was next to impossible to get good tomatoes there. I believe it was because the cool nights they have make it very difficult for the tomatoes to ripen...they don't have much trouble setting fruit...but the nights are so cold..they don't mature.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 46
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Healthy Garden Formula
Posted: 2/9/2009 12:10:50 PM
...I suppose that Sub Arctic tomato is a determinate type...I'll bet several of the early determinates would be likely candidates. I've grown a tomato called 4th of July for years..Just a couple plants to get an early tomato. They don't grow too big..so wrapping some plastic around a tomato tower would probably give them a real chance of ripening.
 mrgarden
Joined: 3/22/2007
Msg: 47
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Garden Time...even here up north
Posted: 2/14/2009 9:54:25 PM
I'm in heaven after finding this thread....I thought I was looking for love on POF, and here I am... a lot more excited about finding fellow gardeners!!

Up here in Western NY, it's also time to plant indoor tomatoes, peppers, herbs, etc. in my temp. greenhouse...i.e., (AKA spare bedroom). I acquired a commercial-sized (20'w x 30'l x 12'h) greenhouse last fall, and hope to have it operational by March 1st. I might even start and sell veggie plants at the local public market.

Among my plans at extending the season of other crops this coming fall/winter, I plan to grow about 6 varieties tomatoes in the g-house to see if I can harvest em thru xmas. Anybody else have experience at extending the veggie season....either before or after the "typical" growing season? With a big greenhouse, I'm open to any/all ideas.

I don't know about you folks, but I can't look forward enough to spring!! My lettuce seed gets planted every year under plastic here by 3/1, even if I have to shovel the snow off my raised beds. The payoff: 1st salads by 4/30

Anyone else getting planting fever ?? GARY
 texasbaby
Joined: 7/21/2005
Msg: 48
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Garden Time...even here up north
Posted: 2/16/2009 11:32:54 AM
Well, in a perfect world, the "one" for me would be another gardening foodie, who lived 20 miles away.
At my house everyone is ready to be outside digging in the dirt. My 7 year old ask me this week-end if it was time to get out our saved seeds to see what we could grow this year.
Here in Texas it really is time ~ I've already seen the first rose bud opening.

tb
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 49
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Garden Time...even here up north
Posted: 2/16/2009 1:02:29 PM
You are so lucky..I want to sniff that rose bud...
..But seriously folks
..I'm wondering about keeping tomato plants growing in a greenhouse until X-mas. I think the commercial growers go through a bunch of natural gas keeping them warm enough to ripen tomatoes. They plant them hydroponically any more..(without soil)..and tie them to the rafters..and then tie them to the strings. I haven't a clue on varieties..but you ought to be able to Google some information on greenhouse production from your local universities.
 Moonchild51
Joined: 3/11/2007
Msg: 50
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Garden Time...even here up north
Posted: 2/16/2009 7:31:02 PM
You all have me envious! We still have mounds of snow and really cold weather here. In the summer, it is difficult to grow things in my yard. I have clay soil. I would have to bring in a lot of dirt to make a veggie garden. I do have an herb bed though and I grow tomatoes in planters. Nothing like a fresh tomato or two from the garden!
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 51
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Garden Time...even here up north
Posted: 2/17/2009 10:48:57 AM
Just two words for you Moonie...Raised Beds. You don't need to build them any higher than 8 inches...and you can probably get free compost from your city's leaf collection department. Build them in the fall with something like used concrete block, some manufactured wood product (like they use on decks these days) or Cedar 2x8's...you don't want preservatives from treated lumber leaching into the soil. If you're willing to replace them frequently...any hardwood will do. Get a little masonry sand from a concrete supply house, (sometimes they will deliver it in a big plastic fiber bag)...and mix your clay soil, sand..and compost in the raised bed. You'll absolutely love the result. Make one a year until you have four of them..and rotate crops in them each year. Don't make them huge..you want them narrow enough to reach across and weed to the middle without straining.
 texasbaby
Joined: 7/21/2005
Msg: 52
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Garden Time...even here up north
Posted: 2/17/2009 11:22:18 AM
Pup, my daughter uses just four small raised beds each year for her garden and I am always amazed by how much such a small space produces.
She works out of town a lot and her S/O will water, but he doesn't pick anything....
So,, I do! I always come home with lots of goodies from my raids.. hehehe

tb
 Moonchild51
Joined: 3/11/2007
Msg: 53
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Garden Time...even here up north
Posted: 2/17/2009 1:55:32 PM
Hey Pup? What a wonderful idea! I never would have thought of that. I was considering doing that for my flowers but instead had my Son do a lot of diggin with me last year! There is a spot here that would be perfect for at least two raised beds. I miss my lettuce, peppers and cukes! Again, many thanks for puttin that bee in my bonnet!
 mrgarden
Joined: 3/22/2007
Msg: 54
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Garden Time...even here up north
Posted: 2/18/2009 6:59:54 PM
What is a "bee in my bonnet." Sounds like a soon to happen be sting to me.

Pupdaddy...I agree with you completely. I've been using raised beds for 10 years now. In addition to the commonly discussed advantages of good space utilization, maximizing yields, and simplifying soil improvement efforts, veggis planted in a raised bed arrangement are typically planted much closer together than by the open-garden traditional row approach....essentially all the area of the raised bed is used for growing. What I have noticed is that once veggis are established, there is very little soil exposed to either weed infiltration or to excessive soil moisture loss. I need to water my raised beds less often than my open garden. The ONLY precaution is that intensive gardening in a raised bed quickly strips nutrients from the soil. I try to make sure I fertilize heavily at the end of each season, and add compost-type materials to the soil at least 1x yearly( my favorite is leaf compost that I get free from my town.

A final advantage of using a raised bed is that it can easily be covered to extend the growing season either in the fall, or in the VERY early spring. A few 2x2 stakes, arched 2 inch strips of plywood, clear plastic sheeting, and a few rocks to weigh down the plastic are all that is needed to allow me to grow lettuces from the beginning of March to the middle of December...without use of any heat source other than the sun. Lady Moonchild, with even a harsher winter than mine, you should contemplate this approach. Winter here is too long for me to wait...so I devise ways to start early, and continue growing late in the season. With my new greenhouse, I will likely go crazy this year.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 55
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Garden Time...even here up north
Posted: 2/19/2009 10:27:33 AM
..I have an idea for you..instead of all the wood for hoops over your raised beds, see if you can get some 3/4 inch plastic conduit..and a heat gun. You can poke them in the soil..or fasten larger pieces of scrap metal pipe to the inside of your raised bed..and then take the heat gun and warm them and bend them right over the top. I just had this flash of inspiration after reading your post....I think I'm going to have to give it a try myself.
 mrgarden
Joined: 3/22/2007
Msg: 56
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Garden Time...even here up north
Posted: 2/19/2009 3:44:03 PM
I've also thought of PVC pipe..however, I was worried about the pipe deforming when it got hot under the plastic. Good idea PD!
 junipermoon
Joined: 3/1/2006
Msg: 57
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gardening
Posted: 3/30/2009 5:33:52 PM

I think I am addicted to fresh basil.


'addicted' doesn't begin to describe it. i'd move to italy just to have fresh basil year round.

i heard a legend about a man who smelled basil so frequently that a scorpion grew in his brain. well worth it, i'm sure! another story says that you need to sit naked on the ground before planting basil.
 texasbaby
Joined: 7/21/2005
Msg: 58
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gardening
Posted: 3/30/2009 8:12:09 PM
Well, I grow all my herbs on my back porch in big pots. Do you suppose I could just sit naked on a deck chair beside the basil pot?

tb
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