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 jheldatksuedu
Joined: 3/11/2005
Msg: 26
Chuck it all, Sailboat around the world With KidsPage 2 of 7    (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)
I almost bought a 38 footer on ebay last week, I was high bidder 14 out of the last 20 seconds of the auction. It was Chris Craft, top of the line, needed a little work, the front deck was opened up like a sardine can but that would be an easy fix. It was a beautiful boat and would have served my purpose nicely. It was in Seatle, I would have probably have taken it through the canal to the gulf. Already have electroninc charts for that trip.
 jheldatksuedu
Joined: 3/11/2005
Msg: 27
Chuck it all, Sailboat around the world With Kids
Posted: 11/23/2005 5:36:16 AM
I've been on the road, I bought a 38 foot 1968 Hughes on ebay in Mobile, Al. That's one that will make it around the world. I'm in eastern Connecticut right now for Thanksgiving with my brother. I looked at the boat, it's a great deal, a little cosmetic damage on the side that can be fixed in a day or so. I just bought my self rich yesterday, I bought a bunch of stuff I needed for the boat, got about $2000 worth of stuff for $400. 80 watt flexible solar panel, emergency Katadyn 35 watermaker, stainless seaplane anchor, and a bunch of little stuff, books, lobsterman hats etc. It was at a marine consignment shop in Mystic, Boat Stuff, (Tell Paula Hi for me, great place,).

I had bought about the same amount of stuff there two years ago when I bought my other boat. She even had a SS flue from the wood stove I bought last time that she had been keeping and gave me. She was on my email list when I took the last trip. When I called her up at home (she was closed due to a car accident) she said "Oh, your the guy that bought the sailboat from the boy scouts in Ohio and sailed all year, you should publish those stories, sure I'll come down and open up."

I bought the replacement stanchions the other day at a local marina, and a Bruce type anchor in Sarosota, Fl. on ebay, should buy a plow type tonight at the same place. Anchors are like tools I always have to many, some say you can't, I sort of beleive that. I'll carry those the 15 miles from the outlet near the airport back to the boat on my bicycle gas trailer. I still need to get 200 feet of chain for the Bahamas, I'm told the coral cuts an anchor rope faster than a sharp knife cuts warm butter. I also want to find an oil stove and oven, to replace the propane one. The boat has a brand new Volvo 30 hp diesel. It was advertised with only two sails but it has 5, roller furled genoa headsail, original genoa, cutter stay sail and a spinnaker. I've wanted to try a spinnaker for a long time. I'll need a spinnaker tamer device and maybe try flying it off the front stay instead of a pole if I'm by myself. They make and sell a device for that on ebay, I can make one real easy to try it, and make the tamer too. The boat was completely outfitted, a turnkey opperation, even had a half bottle of whiskey in the fridge. Plates, silverware, nav equipment, charts, life jackets, two anchors, a danforth and fortress, a full rope locker, extra blocks and hardware etc. None of that was mentioned in the ebay ad, and the extras mesh and compliment real nicely with the extras I have on the old boat.
 jheldatksuedu
Joined: 3/11/2005
Msg: 28
Chuck it all, Sailboat around the world With Kids
Posted: 11/23/2005 6:11:40 AM
I also want to get some storm sails, a trysail and storm jib, might buy a used headsail from a huge boat to get the the 9-10 oz fabric and make them. The storm jib would be almost already made using the top and I think the trysail could come out of the lower tack corner.

I've been thinking of a name for the boat since it's made of fiberglass and can be cutter rigged, I was thinking something in the "glass cutter" form but would like something a little twisted like "SiO2 Cut'r." SiO2 is the chemical formula for glass, but it's really the formula for sand too and I'm not too fond of "sand cutter," LOL. Maybe I need the formula for borosilicate glass. What do you think, I welcome suggestions and want some critique here.

I like the chemical formula idea to have something a little educated and unique. The glass cutter would also fit a hobby, stained glass, I will replace the glass panels in the companionway doors on the boat with stained glass pieces probably with a nautical theme.
 jheldatksuedu
Joined: 3/11/2005
Msg: 29
Chuck it all, Sailboat around the world With Kids
Posted: 11/23/2005 8:03:01 AM
I just found the true formula for what the boat is made of, E-glass, that's what standard fiberglass is, it's Alumino Borosilicate glass, AlO3-B203-SiO2, nope not going to go that way, LOL. Back under the thinking cap.
 jheldatksuedu
Joined: 3/11/2005
Msg: 30
Chuck it all, Sailboat around the world With Kids
Posted: 7/16/2007 6:38:14 PM
A lot of water has gone under the keel or should I say keels since I last posted here. I've now got a 45 foot steel center co-ckpit ketch, and a 38 hughes sloop. I'm getting ready to head around the world. I haven't found the wife and kids yet but still hopeful. I'm pretty sure I won't come back without them.

My boats are in Florida right now, I'm in Kansas, I'll come out around Key West and head to the Carribean then I'll be up the east coast, New England and Nova Scotia area with my boat. I'm planing a circumnavigation that will take 5 years. I am looking for a 1st mate for this round the world cruise, applications are now being accepted. I also have a couple boats I need to liquidate before I leave to help fund the trip. If your interested in any of this from the old stories to the new boat you can check out my website jheld.mysite.com

Good luck and may your winds be fair.
Jon
 jheldatksuedu
Joined: 3/11/2005
Msg: 31
Chuck it all, Sailboat around the world With Kids
Posted: 8/9/2007 2:45:22 PM
Is a sailboat not a water RV, I sure would think so....

I'm back in Florida, spent the better part of a month in Kansas and also was in Arkansas helping my brother build a concrete uinderground house, a couple more pours and then a big one, the 2nd floor roof and it will be ready for the real work to start, the interior.

I've got one of the old boats ready to sell, got a person coming down from Canada to look at it soon. The 2nd still need some work but coming along nicely, it should sell pretty quickly once it's ready to go.

It's hot down here, work mornings and evenings and siesta in the early afternoon.

I took my test and passed for the amateur radio general class, I'm sure I'm one of the only people in the world to have that license for over a month, own an HF radio and not been on the air. There will be plenty of time for that later. I found out that I can send and recieve email with the radio, probably not any pictures but text should be fine. While I was there I also took the Extra class test, I didn't study for it but it was free to take, I missed passing it by 4 questions out of 60, no big deal, don't need that.

Have a great day.
 kawi-rider
Joined: 6/10/2006
Msg: 32
Chuck it all, Sailboat around the world With Kids
Posted: 8/9/2007 5:21:25 PM
Don't feel bad, a lot of hams have a license and have never used it. Okay, maybe they weren't so motivated as to even buy a radio!

Good luck and enjoy your journey. I know that a maritime net meets on 14.300 MHz in the 20 meter band which your General class license covers. Myself, I just bought a low power (QRP) radio last week and am patiently waiting for 10 meters (28 MHz) to open up again. We're going to need a few more sunpots first.
 jheldatksuedu
Joined: 3/11/2005
Msg: 33
Chuck it all, Sailboat around the world With Kids
Posted: 8/9/2007 5:53:22 PM
I used to have a Kawi 400, it's the one I rode year round and rode 50 miles at 17 below one Kansas Winter. I will always tell about riding 10 miles to campus on ice, parking the bike, getting off and immediately falling on my butt, I could ride but not walk on the stuff. And then one 12 inch snow day having a flat tire on the bike, being picked up by a co worker who didn't even know it was me till 5 minutes later when I managed to pull off enough layers to be recognizable.

I've been big into 2m and packet for a long time. The radio came with my last boat, it was in Florida and I was in Kansas, now that I'm back in Florida I'll probably spend some time checking out the radio, but first I've got to sell two old boats. The sunspots are on the way up, a couple more years and they'll be back. Maybe we'll talk sometime. Later
 GuitarGuy_
Joined: 3/15/2007
Msg: 34
Chuck it all, Sailboat around the world With Kids
Posted: 8/9/2007 10:44:48 PM
My best friend's family did that when he was in grade 9. They ran into some tough water here and there. A couple typhoons. It was nice but not quite the picnic they were expecting.
 jheldatksuedu
Joined: 3/11/2005
Msg: 35
Chuck it all, Sailboat around the world With Kids
Posted: 8/10/2007 10:04:51 AM
I know it's not always going to be a picnic, I've already been through some pretty rough stuff,and had to bail with a 5 gal bucket for 28 hours once. I could stop long enough to make and eat a sandwich but then had to work double hard for a few minutes. It took the better part of a week for my feet and hands to get back to normal.

As for 3 days vs years, the kids would have duties on the boat and have hobbies just like they were are home, in fact they would be at home. The 45 foot boat is big enough that people can get "lost" and be out of each others hair if they want too, with multiple cabins, engine room, lots of deck, bowsprit and cabin top space. I'll have an inflateable dingy, hard dingy, inflatable kayak and probably even take a windsurfer too. Think I'll leave my big backpack, X-country skis and foldup canoe home, LOL.
 Miss W
Joined: 12/4/2006
Msg: 36
Chuck it all, Sailboat around the world With Kids
Posted: 8/10/2007 11:18:23 AM
I personally enjoy sailing, but would never want to do one long around the world trip on a sail boat. I wouldn't mind a series of small jaunts for a couple of weeks here or there. I can see where it would be a fabulous opportunity to see a lot of places, but in small doses, please.

I remember reading about a family a few years back who took one long trip and returned to get a divorce.
 jheldatksuedu
Joined: 3/11/2005
Msg: 37
Chuck it all, Sailboat around the world With Kids
Posted: 8/10/2007 11:27:01 AM
I remember lots of people that have gotten a divorce and they didn't take a long trip on a sailboat...... Maybe if they had, LOL.... I'm sure a trip like this would either make you or break you, that's for sure. I would spend at least a month a year back home, off the boat, maybe more.
Thanks for adding your comment.
 Miss W
Joined: 12/4/2006
Msg: 38
Chuck it all, Sailboat around the world With Kids
Posted: 8/10/2007 11:33:24 AM

I remember lots of people that have gotten a divorce and they didn't take a long trip on a sailboat......


Very true. There's a high rate among those who have never seen the ocean, I'm sure.
 jheldatksuedu
Joined: 3/11/2005
Msg: 39
Chuck it all, Sailboat around the world With Kids
Posted: 8/11/2007 6:47:23 AM
Hudson:
I don't really need or am looking for confirmation about the decision, I'm going, I need the mate (that's what this is all about.) Something about having kids that I just can't or don't want to do by myself, LOL.

Money is not the problem, nor the hole in the career, can't say either is a big deal, life on a sailboat is or can be very inexpensive, even more so for someone very handy with tools and not in a hurry. As for the 300 miles out in the Indian ocean, might never be there, it's the shoreline I'm going to see, the middle of the Indian ocean looks just like the middle of the gulf of Mexico.

I'm sure we would have stuff to talk about, I've canoed north of the Artic Circle myself. Thanks for the comment, have a great day.
 BobRuinedTheDate
Joined: 3/11/2007
Msg: 40
Chuck it all, Sailboat around the world With Kids
Posted: 8/11/2007 8:00:01 AM
I lived for 12 years on a bare granite reef about the size of a small bedroom in the Baltic Sea and ate tern and, if lucky, albatross droppings and made clothes from the occasional plastic waste that floated outside the shipping lanes and ended up on my reef and while I loved every minute of it, I truly needed a break from the whipcrack pace of my prior life as a storage unit attendant, and found I could more quickly and deeply access both my spiritual and emotional sides, I wouldn't recommend this lifestyle for a sailboat full of kids and a pony lashed to the heaving and rolling deck. However, for me, it was just perfect!
 jheldatksuedu
Joined: 3/11/2005
Msg: 41
Chuck it all, Sailboat around the world With Kids
Posted: 8/11/2007 8:11:32 AM
Ok I peeked, got to admit.

If the pony is the only thing, we should talk. After all the Ark had all those animals on it didn't it..... If I remember it would have had two ponies...

(FYI, when I peeked I read ever word. I do have more than 20 pairs of shoes.....)
 jheldatksuedu
Joined: 3/11/2005
Msg: 43
Chuck it all, Sailboat around the world With Kids
Posted: 8/11/2007 8:13:47 PM
Wolfie and Hudson:
I've got two boats for sale, very reasonable. Known lots of people to have dogs on a boat, not many cats, but a few. Many dogs also go well with a backpacking trip too. You shouldn't have to sell everything to do something like this, it's much safer to rent out to a friend and caretaker and have something to come back too.

Sam:
I've known lots of kids that have spent years on a boat, when they are real young it makes no difference, from 3 to 6, I'd say you spend a lot of time on land, but that's the whole reason for the trip anyway to see all the exotic lands (in the past I'd say I spent 80% of my awake time on land.) Kids are very adaptable. Imagine learning about herrons in Florida, where you can actually see them in action and then penguins in Iceland, and sea turtles in the mediteranean, all in the same year. And they also got to visit Orlando, Charleston, Washington DC, NY, and Boston (maybe even have a tea party,) hear Big Ben and see the white cliffs of Dover, etc, etc.

I suppose they should fall asleep in that stable land lubber household worrying about the crazy neighbors that might burn their house down in the middle of the night, or the skinned knees from sliding home in a little league game, or having your car attacked by a carjacker and taken to a street corner in Newark and shot by gang members execution style. They can watch on the news about people being killed by crazies everyday. Or maybe they just learn about crack the hard way. Life is dangerous no matter where you are. I think swimming with the sea turtles and dolphins, fishing and adding to a shell collection is much safer and more educational then going to the mall to hang out and playing video games.

I don't have kids, but If I get lucky I will, that's the whole reason for me being on here and posting this.
 jheldatksuedu
Joined: 3/11/2005
Msg: 44
Chuck it all, Sailboat around the world With Kids
Posted: 8/15/2007 5:55:46 AM
This thread is two years old, and yes I am closer to being able to start on this adventure, it was put off for most of the last year by buying a and fixing a large boat that will make the trip infinitely more comfortable. It was a boat I had dreamed about but never thought I could afford, the right circumstances came up almost tailor made to fit my situation and skills and I now have a boat worth as much as my house and my major investmeant really is only my time. This has also set me back since I now have two boats to sell instead of one, I was expecting to have them sold by now, but it seems others aren't intersted in a project boat so I've had to spend time fixing them to recoup my investment in them. They are ready to go. after I sell them I am ready to start on my trip, the big boat isn't ready but I can finish it anywhere, it's large enough to have a 10 KW generator, welder, and machine shop on board. The main thing I need to do is intall the tanks back under the floorboards. I can easily live with bottled water and 5 gal buckets till that is done.

(IMHO) This points out one of the problems with todays society, very few people know how to do anything, 50 years ago everybody drove a vehicle that was junk and knew how to fix it, now they are too complicated and most people know nothing about them. Everything else we use is similar, to complicated to fix, at least that's everybodies attitude. It's easy to make quite a good living for yourself in todays society just fixing and reselling tossed out "junk" if you have rudimentary fix it skills.

Anyway back to comments on the last couple of posts, sure there is love for the wife involved, but most women who have kids and want kids want to make sure the kids are or would be well loved, I assure them that is the case. Many men want the wife but could care less about the kids and their well being. It's a package deal, I want the whole package, the family, not just the wife. I would accept a woman with young kids, I "need" to be considered a dad that is the important thing I am looking for in a relationship with kids. With young kids I can easily attain that, with young teens it's harder but still might be possible. As for a newborn on a boat, basically the boat is just a house that floats, it's quite easy to stay in one place for as long as necessary, the driveway is just a little wet or you rent dock space. I could even buy a car and keep it on land if that was necessary and sell it when we continue on the trip.

Life on a boat going around the world is not all oceans and waves, most of the time it is exploring the lands close to the oceans, you might spend a few days crossing an ocean but once you get to the other side you spend many weeks or months exploring the towns, you might spend half a day every week travelling from one harbour to the next down the coast. It bicycles, dingies, kayaks, playing in the surf, exploring uninhabited islands, and historical towns and countries. It meeting people that speak different languages and eat different foods. The waves are just the highways that need to be endured to get to the destinations, they are the breaks when you sit on the deck with nothing to bother you reading that latest book you found in a thrift store in Tunisa or traded with a child in Sarnia. It's also the time to work on your math, spelling and history homework....

Most kids that have grown up on a boat are much better adjusted than kids that have grown up on land. I can't stand society today that thinks every kid must wear a helmet when they ride a bike because one child out of a million might get killed, life is dangerous, if we remove all risk life is no fun. We can live in a bubble and have no contact with anybody else to eliminate any chance of getting a disease. Instead we spend millions of dollars on kids helmets, that are no fun to wear and insist that kids wear them. Out of all of us that grew up without helmets how many people do we know that ended up with a life long injury that would have been prevented by one. Sure there are a few, I'm not saying that, but lets be realistic. I rode thousands of miles on my ten speed when I was a kid, I was often 50 miles from home on a Saturday afternoon, sure I had falls and injuries but none are still with me, except for that class picture in 5th grade when I had a profile shot becasue of the huge scab on the side of my face. It was the first thing to touch the pavement at 30+ mph after I topped a hill and disovered there was a diagonal strip of ice across the road in the shadow of a tree. I lived and so did all my friends. A helmet probably wouldn't have prevented that anyway. Today we don't let kids learn to juggle risk vs reward. It's against the law to let a kid have fun because they might get hurt.
 jheldatksuedu
Joined: 3/11/2005
Msg: 45
Chuck it all, Sailboat around the world With Kids
Posted: 8/15/2007 6:52:55 AM
Seanick:
No offense taken, I am well prepared before I do anything, my 28 hours of bailing was due to a weak point in my first boats hull, I had sailed her for 9 months from lake Erie to south Florida. I failed to realize how quickly it got shallow on the west coast of Florida and run aground with a following sea while I was getting the charts out to figure out my approach to the harbor. I was never in danger for my life, at any point I could jump out and walk to shore. I was just saving my investment waiting for the wind to shift so I could come into a port and be lifted out to repair the damage. I could have paid $1k to sea tow and not have bailed that long, but for one days work of bailing I saved myself $1k, not bad pay. The hull had plywood bulkheads that had become week through the years and allowed too much flexing of the fiberglass when it was aground cracking the hull at the back of the keel. I repaired it by replacing the plywood with fiberglass bulkheads making it stronger than new.

There are many people that do go to sea unprepared and many that are well prepared and run into challenges beyond the preparations. The sea is often a dangerous thing, but danger should not be something to keep us from living our lives. Danger is often what we seek to make life interesting. It's only smart to be well prepared for the possible danger. Why do people speed in a car, most often it's not because something is life threatening and they have to get to point B before a certain time. Often it's because of the exhilaration created by the speed. Many people have died doing stupid things. It's a process we are all familiar with called natural selection, it eliminates many of the less intelligent of our species. Your friends that had been lost at sea were lost not only because rescue was not available they were doing a dangerous job and probably enjoying the risk. Life is the biggest cause of death.

I have been sailing for most of my adult life, I started with a small boat from a yardsale, got a book to read how to use it, and have been getting bigger boats ever since. I enjoy reading and learning. I've always been one to enjoy the danger and adventure of pushing something just at its limits and often slightly beyond. I was one that was going out when everybody else was coming in due to the foul weather. I would see what would break and enjoy the challenge of overcoming it and jury rigging to get back in.

Life without risk is extremely dull, we would all go crazy, life is all about making inteligent decisions balancing risk with potential reward.
 valsalva22
Joined: 4/27/2005
Msg: 46
Chuck it all, Sailboat around the world With Kids
Posted: 8/15/2007 6:57:57 AM
I would love to sail around the world but unfortunately, don't know the first thing about sailboats, LOL.
 jheldatksuedu
Joined: 3/11/2005
Msg: 48
Chuck it all, Sailboat around the world With Kids
Posted: 8/15/2007 9:33:39 AM
Seanick:
Every time I pushed a boat a little farther and had a disaster I was learning, learning the power and the ability of the winds and the water, learning what I am capable of and what can't be overcome, all this happened on an inland lake less then 2 miles wide and durring the summer, I was never more than a mile from shore and the water was warm, I was at most 3 miles from home. I had a life jacket and would wear it when it was dangerous. I am not a dangerous person, I am an extremely educated person with experiences that many can only dream about. I leave very little to chance when I am trully at risk. When I travel across an ocean I have multiple backup saftey plans, I have hand operated water makers, self inflating life rafts, two eperb emergency beacons, a inflateable dingy, as well as many other devices to help in an emergency. I have all this equipment and I know how to use it. I am far from a dangerous man.

I could case less that you didn't have the opportunities that I had, that you had to be there because it was your job, that certainly doesn't make you a better person at judging somebody else with the limited knowledge gained from the posting on a forum like this. I have an education that allows me to calculate the strength of a piece of equipment and I have the practical knowledge to know when to apply those eqautions and when to allow a larger margin of saftey.

I suppose when you are at work you have never made a mental error and did something a little too late. That's what happened when I run aground, I failed to know how quickly it got shallow in this area, and I had been crossing the gulf of Mexico for three days in a storm with a seasick mate. My hands were full, I was doing the best I could for a solo sailor. Life on the sea for a solo sailor is a totally different situation then life on a working boat with many hands on deck. A solo sailer is responsible for all aspects of the boat. From the mechanics to the route figuring, the setting and choice of the sails to the meal preparing and planning, from weather forcasting to cleaning the head. It's much more of a challenge than just knowing how to run the machinery to operate the fishing nets.

I learned from my experiences also. Life is a learning process. I've certainly learned more than most and intend on continuing that process. Please take your negativity and whollier than thou attitude someplace else if you have nothing positive to add. I am not a dangerous person, anybody that has spent anytime with me picks up on that very quickly. I'll admit I have done some fun things like drive a car at over twice the legal speed limit but I did my homework first. I didn't just go out and do it, I worked up to it, I have the proper car, and checked it out well. My sailing experience is much the same. I've worked most of my adult life preparing myself for this voyage, I've taken the better part of three years after I really decided to do it and I'm still not away from the dock. I have the proper equiment and I'm checking it out. Even when I finally do pull away from the dock, I've chosen a route that will allow many months before I'm more than couple days from land. I'll have many miles under my belt with this new boat before I really tackle an ocean.
 jheldatksuedu
Joined: 3/11/2005
Msg: 49
Chuck it all, Sailboat around the world With Kids
Posted: 8/15/2007 10:12:49 AM
Also aimed at Seanick:
What are your plans when your cat turns turtle? That to me that is a disaster waiting to happen. And you have the nerve to call somebody else dangerous. Believe me I've been there, cats and trimarans too, I was amazed how a power boat could not see me less than 100 feet away after my catamaran came apart in high winds, the center structure failed and then all you have is pieces floating around connected by cables. Nothing more than a foot out of the water in 2 foot waves. This was also part of my self education, yes once more less than one mile from shore. Luckilly the wind was blowing us toward shore. I had my best friend with me then. Infact he does not think I'm a selfish and dangerous person, he went so far as to name his first born after me. That son is getting married next month.
 jheldatksuedu
Joined: 3/11/2005
Msg: 50
Chuck it all, Sailboat around the world With Kids
Posted: 8/15/2007 12:43:11 PM
My my; Now aren't we the Pot calling the Kettle black. A cat that won't turn turtle and the seas are OK for you to roam and possibly get into trouble and need the services of a rescue but others are not up to your standards. Or are you saying there is no possibility for you to get into trouble. Surely you are not that niave....

As for being as Master Mariner I would imagine like most groups, it's mostly just pay your dues and you're in. I know your going to disagree, and I'm sure the group was started with great intentions but if somebody with enough money wanted in, there are sufficient good things that they could do with their money to help sway some oppinions. Titles like that do little to impress me. Granted a life at see is a good start to becoming a good mariner but it's not the only way. Surely there is room enough on the ocean for a Kansas engineering instructor to become an accomplished mariner. I did grow up in New Jersey and it's named after the Island of Jersey surely there is a mariner or two in my heritage.

I choose steel because steel is the only thing that has a chance against coral, your triaxial and Kevlar reinforced composite doesn't stand a chance. Believe me I know composites, I have worked with both Kevlar and triaxial fabrics, taught the class to engineers and was invovled in building and testing the first composite hiway bridge in the world. I don't plan to end up on coral but one never knows. I choose a mono hull because multi hulls can have troubles like I mentioned earlier and I don't like the space mostly taken up by passageways, two are needed where one is in a monohull. Granted they can be faster in certain situations but speed is not what I was looking for. I'm planning on spending 5 years travelling and most of that time will be spent in ports around the world. Unfortunately I didn't have the money (I thought you were a poor deckhand, LOL) to buy what I thought I needed, but I got lucky and worked my way into getting it. I can also navigate with a sextant and have two on board. My steel hull is fabricated with three separate compartments for the redundant boyancy desired in an ocean going vessel.

I would welcome any offers of software, I have quite a bit myself, it's lightweight and small. Some programs can be quite useful. I have planned to purchase CD charts of the entire world, just haven't been up to the persons place to look at it before I lay the money down.
 jheldatksuedu
Joined: 3/11/2005
Msg: 51
Chuck it all, Sailboat around the world With Kids
Posted: 8/15/2007 12:52:07 PM
Lady Kay: Money is not the big thing, if you desire to do something and decide to do it there are always ways to get around the money problem, surely having money does make lots easier to accomplish most anything but don't let a lack of money stop you. There are often ways you can work your way around, certainly ships need workers. It doesn't cost much while you are on board, there is little to spend anything on. Sailing my own boat was my choice because it then provides me an inexpensive place to stay once I get there. It's taken quite a few years of adventure and work to get to the place where I'm at least able to see in the near future the ability to set sail and begin the journey.

While on the way food is the major expense, and it can be not much different then if one was at home.
 jheldatksuedu
Joined: 3/11/2005
Msg: 52
Chuck it all, Sailboat around the world With Kids
Posted: 8/15/2007 2:22:31 PM
Seanick: I call a spade a spade, and you were the first top question somebodies ability without knowledge. I have plenty of social skills but surely don't waste them on people that don't deserve them. This forum was not about asking advice from other mariners, I've done my homework and put in my time and feel quite comfortable with my decisions. I welcome advice from people that give it in a polite way but your starting out with death on the ocean and giving the reason of stupid sailors and implying I might be one did not fit that from.

It's been fun.
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