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Show ALL Forums  > British Columbia  > Assisted suicide - the right to die with dignity      Home login  
 AUTHOR
 Ticketoride
Joined: 6/3/2004
Msg: 3
Assisted suicide - the right to die with dignityPage 1 of 5    (1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
I want quality of life, not quantity. I have decided that if I were to be faced with a horrid existence such as my mother endured I would not want to prolong the agony.

Are you suggesting we change the Laws, challenging the Medical Establishment's & Drug Empire's Divine Right to Government Funds?
 Wildman46
Joined: 6/4/2008
Msg: 9
Assisted suicide - the right to die with dignity
Posted: 11/5/2008 4:11:02 PM
Op assisted suicide should be a law everywhere. I remember once telling my ex that I don't ever want to live long enough to be a burden to my loved ones, her response was " That ship already sailed Allen" .

We all for the most part choose how we live our lives, I think we should also have a say in how our life end( if it's possible).
 Ticketoride
Joined: 6/3/2004
Msg: 10
Assisted suicide - the right to die with dignity
Posted: 11/5/2008 4:31:40 PM
Just to serve as an Example of oblivious Medico Rederick:

"Margaret Cottle, a palliative care physician and UBC instructor, argues that any case supporting one's right to die is scientifically groundless."

Opponents call assisted suicide groundless

In other Words ... unbearable Pain in imminent Death has not been scientifically established as a Reason to terminate a Life, ie. your Right, Opinion or Judgment is irrelevant.

Don't forget ... these Kind of Folks have Degrees up to the Ying-Yang, all Knowledgeable, but can't even deal with simple Ideas to formulate a rather obvious Solution.


And this is supposedly because:

"We do not know, scientifically, whether when you die you don't go into screaming agony someplace."

It's Experts, Authorities ... ie. complete Idiots who are obstructing the Right-to-Die Legislations.

* I'm sure good 'ol Margaret always receives her 'Eli Lily' Bonus Cheques on Time ... *

And also, the Roman Catholic Church said assisted suicide is a dangerous Step that devalues Life.

And it does'nt end there either:

"The Supreme Court of Canada struck down the case for assisted suicide when it ruled in 1994 that Victoria resident Sue Rodriguez, who had Lou Gherig's disease, could not end her life."

She had argued Sections of the Criminal Code violated her Right to terminate her Life. The Court simply disagreed that these Sections were in Conflict, and that a Prohibition has no applicable Bearing on any Mistreatment. All that means is that the Angle, or the Basis of her Case was not accepted by the Court.

The Supreme Court however erred when it stated that:

"Prohibition of suicide reflects part of the fundamental Values of Society and so could not be in Violation of fundamental Justice."

... since there is no established Basis that "assisted Suicide" goes against the Grain of societal Values, nothing was established in respect to fundamental Justice.

In other Words, the Court fabricated the Pretense that "Assisted Suicide" is not in Sync with popular Opinion.

Many now believe the Ball is in the Gov'ts Court ...
 You go first
Joined: 5/1/2008
Msg: 12
Assisted suicide - the right to die with dignity
Posted: 11/5/2008 10:43:35 PM
It's interesting to see that both Oregon and Washington now have assisted suicide laws.

It's obviously a huge issue as our population is aging and living longer, whether healthy or not.

When my late husband first got sick, he said he'd "go out into the woods with a rifle and just not come back" if he got worse. He didn't, of course, but it was his way of saying he didn't want to be a burden.

We later had the conversation about "no heroic measures" and our immediate families knew of his wishes if it came to that. It did. I had no hesitation in requesting the Doctors cease further treatment as it wasn't my choice, but my husband's.

In my opinion, there is a huge difference between someone suicidal because of a mental illness and someone with a terminal, no-hope, end-stage disease who wants to leave before they can't communicate or are in constant agony.

I absolutely believe a person should have the right to request (legal) medication to hasten their exit so they can die on their own terms. Sadly, there are enough cases where families have sued Doctors for 'not doing enough' that the medical community has no choice but to prolong the life of the patient in agony because the family can still override the patient's wishes.

There will be those that argue the "slippery slope" - that's b.s. If there were Legislation, standards and procedures would be in place - all "lawyer approved".
 Ticketoride
Joined: 6/3/2004
Msg: 13
Assisted suicide - the right to die with dignity
Posted: 11/5/2008 10:55:59 PM
In my opinion, there is a huge difference between someone suicidal because of a mental illness and someone with a terminal, no-hope, end-stage disease who wants to leave before they can't communicate or are in constant agony.

Exactly, Standards would have to be drawn up, and I sure wouldn't want to leave that up to the Medicos/Pharmaceuticals who want to deny your Rights because of supposed scientific Invalidities, ie. $$$cience thinks they can overrule your Rights to Life, incl. when to terminate it in humane Fashion.

Sadly, there are enough cases where families have sued Doctors for 'not doing enough' that the medical community has no choice but to prolong the life of the patient in agony because the family can still override the patient's wishes.

Because no current Rights to "Assisted Suicide" exists, no Laws are in place that govern Professional Conduct, leaving the Door wide open for Lawsuits. Once it becomes legal, it would be no more complicated than a few Amendments to the existing Mal-Practice Regulations.
 rockondon
Joined: 2/21/2007
Msg: 14
view profile
History
Assisted suicide - the right to die with dignity
Posted: 11/5/2008 11:23:54 PM
it can be a subtle distinction between delaying death and prolonging suffering.
 Ideoform
Joined: 9/23/2007
Msg: 17
view profile
History
Assisted suicide - the right to die with dignity
Posted: 11/6/2008 8:35:55 AM
A lot of deaths are already technically assisted suicides. Its done by the Physician when they make decisions regarding end of life care, and there is some risk to them of a lawsuit if its "done incorrectly." Most Physicians will recommend everyone have a Living Will in place which will help with these decisions and remove some of the possible guilt the family members experience when going through end of life issues with a loved one.

However, many times people don't know the reality of the services they are denying themselves. IV's, antibiotics, oxygen, feeding tubes and morphene are all things that can turn a life around at times and the person recovers a few good years after a crisis, even at an advanced age.

Hospice care has progressed considerably over the last 20 years, and they can provide help both with the ethical decision-making and the pallitive care that can ensure that the end of life is approached with minimal pain, suffering, fear and guilt, and with the highest quality of life possible for the remaining time.

Everyone should have a financial Will and a Living Will, and a medical power of attorney chosen. Look into hospice care at least 6 months to a year before it seems necessary--you can actually recover from the extra care and attention hospice provides and then return to it later when it is needed again.

Hospice can be provided in a nursing home, extended care setting, a hospice facility or at home. In each case it extends the amount and type of care to consider ultimate death and the quality of life until death happens.

We have such good pain medications now available that no one should suffer with great pain. We have anti-depressants, and counselling to deal with the fear and anxiety. We now know how to include the family with dignity and not to isolate the dying from their loved ones.

There are many assistive technologies, medical devices, and proceedures that help the non-dying disabled which can help a dying person to be more comfortable, functional and participatory than ever before. These have to sometimes be advocated and even fought for, particularly with the elderly, but they can make a huge difference in someone's life at the passage to the end of life.

For instance, special padding and dressings for prevention of bed sores, communication devices for those with limited movement, automated controls so the person can control the environment in their room, such as to turn on and off a TV, phone, lights, temperature, etc. specialized wheelchair seating to improve lung capacity, a vest that helps someone to cough easily with less effort.
 Ticketoride
Joined: 6/3/2004
Msg: 21
Assisted suicide - the right to die with dignity
Posted: 11/6/2008 10:44:19 AM
Why does the medical and legal profession have the right to prolong human life far past the time one would naturally expire with a terminal illness...

Because Medical Schmexperts & legal Councels charged with the Social Well-being of the Public advise the various Levels of Gov't who then sign these Recommendations into Law. If your first Thought was "Kick Backs" in the Form of pharmaceutical monetary philanthropistic Influences, you may well be on the right Track. How many Billions, if not Trillions could be extracted to keep the Dieing alive?

Once we have prolonged their lives to the point where they will drown in their own body fluids, we then fill them with atropine to keep their lungs dry and morphine so that they 'have no pain' from this unhuman existence we have foisted on them. Eventually the morphine shuts down the central nervous system (being too weak from starvation and built up toxins from the liver and kidneys not working) and the process we have prolonged takes place anyway...

Excellent Business Plan !!! And the Taxpayer gets to pick up the Tab, often to the Tune of Millions.

We have such good pain medications now available that no one should suffer with great pain.

They often do not work, and a dying Person may still suffer in excruciating Pain for Years to come. Of the 3 People I know who passed away from long drawn-out terminal Cancer within the last 5 Years, each and everyone was in agonizing Pain irrespective what Medications they were given.
 Ideoform
Joined: 9/23/2007
Msg: 22
view profile
History
Assisted suicide - the right to die with dignity
Posted: 11/6/2008 12:10:39 PM
A living will helps the family to provide only the care that you decide you want--no more no less. I think that not having a living will causes a lot of needless suffering.

You get to decide ahead of time how you want the end of life to be. If you want no extra help from any of these things you can put it in your living will. This takes the family and the professionals "off the hook" in terms of responsibility and cost.

The advantage of hospice is that they don't do anything to extend a life unless it is asked for and wanted. Hospice nurses can explain to nursing home staff, family and others what is going to help and what will just prolong the inevitable.

Making visitors feel more comfortable is something the dying have also wanted. If someone is wheezing and having lots of anxiety and this is something medication can help with then the dying person might want these things if they are offered.

The addition of having life ended with the morally charged term "suicide" by hastening it in more ways than adding too much morphine or providing less than typical medical care is about freedom.

If a person wants to go into the woods with a gun and die alone, they might be needing the freedom to do so--but perhaps they can't move around well enough by the time they made this decision. Sometimes just knowing you "can" do it or "could" do this makes things feel more manageable and the person in question then doesn't feel the need to end things that way anymore. Its knowing you have an "out" at any time that helps.

I think it is the feeling of being trapped and suffering without being able to take action that is the problem. If people are given more choices along the way, at every step of the way, it has been shown to improve a person's perception of pain and discomfort. Choosing where to be at the end of life, and who to be with, and how much medication and support will be available (not necessarily to use--but available) is a big improvement over what was done even a few years ago, where all these decisions were made by the Doctors.

Death does sometimes take some time. It is painful and uncomfortable, but sometimes this time is used to help the person to let go of life and loved ones, and for the loved ones to let go, too. Life is messy, and chaotic and unpredictable. It is difficult to sanitize death and dying for everyone's satisfaction.

I don't work for hospice, but I have done hospice three times with family in the last few years. Once the person was at her home with family surrounding her, and the others were in a nursing home.

I applied what I know about disability to make things more comfortable and easier for everyone. I think that non-disabled dying adults should at minimum have available to them the things a disabled person uses when appropriate. Many of these things were covered by insurance, can be purchased used, be leased or borrowed. And many of these things are also now being used by the healthy non-disabled to help them, since they simply work well and are a help to people.

I also was present for the death of my daughter of a terminal illness that I feel was prolonged way too long, with many unnecessary, intrusive treatments, that were applied against my own and her father's objections.

I feel this was partly because she was just a toddler at the time. Thas was 19 years ago. I complained about it then, and advocated for changes with the hospital for several years. I think that things have changed a lot since then, but we still have a long way to go.

Calling it suicide is part of the problem. If a person is suicidal that is different than if a person is dying too slowly by their preference. If you mention the money savings to a dying person they might feel like more of a burden than is really true, and then become suicidal when they weren't before.

I guess the term Euthanasia is used now for assisted suicide. Suicide has a social stigma associated with mental illness. I wouldn't want to burden a dying person with the implication that they would have to be suicidal to want to hasten their death.

Offering a person a way out, but not insisting they use it or even encouraging them to use it, is sometimes all that is wanted. Assisting a person to suicide has the same stigma as suicide itself. Family and friends who are compassionately wanting to end someone's suffering should not have to think of themselves as assisting a suicide.

There are levels to this, too. Seeing it in terms of black and white: suicide vs. prolonged suffering caused by medical treatments, is polarising many discussions. There is a difference between leaving a gun by the bedside, using Dr. Kervorkian's anesthesia-like methods, using pallitive care but nothing that extends life, offering extra pain medication, and offering breathing, eating, hydrating, elimination and infection fighting assistance. And there are many other things in between.

Its sad that people have had to resort to the many ways of dying that seem like it is not a suicide--like driving a car in a dangerous way, accidents with guns, death by policeman, medication overdoses, ect.... These methods might even cause more suffering for the person because of the fact that it makes the person very isolated. They cannot talk with others about their plans, their upcoming death, or their fears and worries if they are too outside of the norm.

But legalizing it is going to be very tricky because it might make it appear that a person who's quality of life, though survivable, but is somehow considered sub-standard by strangers, is an undesired citizen.

A lot of people abort children with the disability my oldest son has. His life is quite good now, but at the time he was born there was a lot of question about what his future would be like. Is aborting a child who might suffer from a severe disability assisted suicide if you are assuming what the child might want, but are never going to be able to ask them directly?

There is less money for treatments for my son's disability because there are fewer surviving children and therefore less motivation to find a cure or a prevention, or even better day-to-day treatments and equipment.

My daughter's care cost about a half a million dollars 19 years ago. A lot of children's lives could have been saved with that money, if it was used for simpler things like clean water and food. We enrolled her in research so that people could learn how to help the next child that got cancer. This has helped cancer treatment improve, and now her brain tumor might have been removed and she might be in remission if she were born last year.

A lot of things improve if there is a need for them. Helping someone at the end of life is generally not discussed enough and so the improvements might come more gradually. If there was an easy, one-answer-fits- all for this problem, then maybe we would be missing out on learning things that could help a lot of other people.

A sad fact is that a lot of the pain medications intended for the patients are used by the staff. I know this for a fact. There is a great deal of drug addiction among medical professionals. Anesthesiologists dilute the medications up to half sometimes, leaving some patients nearly awake. There are huge numbers of Doctors, Nurses, Veterinarians and Pharmacists who are diluting pain medications every day.

The reason dying patients experience so much pain in this time is that the dying seldom have strong advocates who understand the system and its problems. Dying people have too few legal rights because they can't sue their providers directly, the family often is misled about what has been happening, and are labeled as "not accepting of the finality of death" if they investigate details. If a patient is terminally ill, the family has to prove a loss to be able to benefit from legal services without paying up front. And with a terminal patient it is difficult to prove a loss that wouldn't have occured from the terminal disease itself.

Every patient should have a pain management plan. This can include a variety of types of medications and methods, such as nerve blocks, and even severing of nerves. Pain management used to be literally ignored less than 50 years ago. Particularly among children. Before the 1980's children were routinely given painful medical treatments and surgery without any pain medication at all. Infants who couldn't speak weren't considered capable of feeling pain at all. Simply because they couldn't be asked about it...

I learned this from my father who was a Doctor who helped other Doctors and medical professionals with addictions to the drugs they prescribe to their patients.

 Xavery
Joined: 4/22/2007
Msg: 26
Assisted suicide - the right to die with dignity
Posted: 11/6/2008 7:35:55 PM
OP - Sorry about your mother. I think assisted suicide is acceptable and I would probably opt for it myself if I had ALS.
 Ideoform
Joined: 9/23/2007
Msg: 27
view profile
History
Assisted suicide - the right to die with dignity
Posted: 11/6/2008 8:14:59 PM
It is hard for me to respond to the points being made in one simple explanation or take one "side" because I have been present at many deaths. I think each individual situation has aspects that cannot be decided by a computer or a single set of standards to be applied unilaterally. But without discussion, comparison, contrast and thoughtfulness issues can arise that defeat the purpose of compassion.

Our family were medical missionaries in Nicaragua, and I was witness to an entire village that chose to starve to death (while receiving medical care from our group, ironically) rather than to move to a city slum where they had heard they would be required to give up their culture. I thought that was very brave of them at the time, and I was only eleven years old.

The main arguments against assisted suicide are promoted by advocacy groups made up of disabled people. There was a woman who died this week in my state after being in an iron lung for 60 years. Those closest to her thought she had a lot of positive qualities and was not unhappy to be alive. She graduated from high school, wrote a children's book, and had many friends. She would still be alive except that the backup generator wouldn't start after a power failure. The person who started the Independent Living center movement was also in an iron lung, and managed to leave the hospital, find an apartment, date, graduate from college, and work.

The disabled are inspiring precisely because they manage to find the good in life even under the seemingly most restrictive lifestyles. I know a married couple who have a business and own a home, and have two aides to help them. They both have severe Cerbral Palsy and even need assistance with eating. But they were workshop leaders for us who were learning about disability, and I thought they were very intelligent, passionate and caring individuals.

Today my son showed me a Utube clip this afternoon called Extreme Sitting, listed as "Wheelchair backflip." He has friends on his competitive wheelchair sports team that do handstands in their chairs. His coaches drive modified Harley motorcycles, attend college and have some really gorgeous girlfriends.

Sometimes it is the healthy who never expect to ever have any limitations that see the loss of abilities as devastating. We can unwittingly communicate this to our loved ones by our own attidudes. I have had people say they would NEVER be able to do what I have done, and yet somehow, we seem to be more resilient than we know, and rise above many limitations to find meaning and joy in different aspects of life than before--a life is no less valuable because the ending is near.

From reading these postings about the ending point of the progression of ALS I am tempted to say that perhaps a "solution" would be to make certain types of diseases at certain stages, more accessible to assisted suicide than others...

Suicide is tricky. I have been there when I was the healthiest--at age 17. Yet I have been through so much since then and many things which logically might have made someone very much suicidal, and yet I haven't felt more like living even as I turn 50 (and no medications needed.)

I am saddened that someone's request to die has been ignored way past when death would have come "naturally" if that same person had been living 80 years ago. If someone wants to die naturally, then no religious organization has a right to take that decision away from people that are not their own members, by enforcing force- feeding, or giving them antibiotics, IVs or otherwise giving "patients" services they must pay for that they don't want.

I think Doctors created a problem when they tended over the years to see death as the "enemy" and focus only on developing pills and surgeries, and buildings. The problem became really noticable when a woman had to come to a hospital to give birth as if pregnancy was an illness. Death in a sense is not an illness as much as an inevitability. The truly dying are not patients as much as people who are needing compassion and care like our children do when they are too young to yet manage on their own. The service delivery model of dealing with death when it is imminent is based on a healing model that assumes all illness can be healed with just the right combinations of interventions. Yet all Doctors know that they don't do the healing. The patient's body does. The Doctor just assists this to happen. And just like any physical thing, a body can wear out, and the assistance needs to change from assisting healing to assisting the shutting down process by discerning the individual needs of the dying and their families and friends.

I have always been impressed by our funeral directors. They have learned to say just the right things to soothe and often are better able to ground us than our ministers and preists. There needs to be a person to help us graciously usher the process of going from patient to prospective. (I invented the use of this word for this...anticipation of the transition from dying to death has few words to call it.) And a Doctor might not be the person for this--but would consult in the process. A nurse has the same focus on healing, but more experience with the art of dying than even a Doctor. A hospice worker comes close--but unless freed to legally--cannot actively hasten us accross the river Styx.

I know several "dead people." These are people who were at one point in their lives, considered dead by all medical standards. They have a unique perspective that might make them the best ones to serve in this capacity if even in a very limited way...

We are a mind, a body, and a spirit. A psychologist or counsellor can help us deal with the mental aspects of dying like Elizabeth Kubler Ross does. The medical professionals already help in their way with the body, but the focus is usually too strong on death being an enemy, not a welcome and anticipated friend who can provide relief from a protracted dying. Clergy already are summoned to help but their hands are very tied to only providing a spiritual, religious perspective. Philosophers can answer many questions about the ethics of beginnings and endings, and pose new ones. A good death can have all of these.

I think that clarifying terms is a great way to continue a discussion as in the terms suicide, assisted suicide and euthanasia. Newborns with my son's disability were routinely euthanized before 1955. The recommended "treatment" was to not treat their wounds, and not feed them or give them anything to drink until they died. If this was done as shortly as 50 years ago to infants, I don't see the logic of strident objections of groups advocating anything different for adults now---except to force people to pay for services they don't "need" or want. That is force-feeding of a different sort...

It isn't up to me as an individual to decide what aspects of life have value to someone else. I've seen that there is great joy in finding challenge and acheivement even in the most limited circumstances. As life draws to an end, the limitations might not cause as much emotional suffering if there are trailblazers who can show us that sometimes there are unusual ways to savor life's finite moments.

I think that I can only provide things to think about from my perspective of having lived through a lot of this. (I wish I could come back from the other side and bring ideas from there!) The only missing peice is all those who have gone before.

After everyone begins to openly discuss the issues around death and dying in our age, we can possibly alter our laws to reflect the new medical realities of today. My father and my brother-in-law still live on in that they donated still living organs to those who are alive now, but would surely be dead without them. One was very much alive when his organs were harvested, but his brain was not functioning at all. This was hard for the family but ultimately very moving and rewarding for them. If we can keep a dead person alive, but refuse to allow an alive person in a dead body to die, something is very wrong, indeed.

I sometimes think that the last truly human act a person has is to make his or her last choice. The choice to die; when, where, how and with whom is only given to a very, very few of us.
 Xavery
Joined: 4/22/2007
Msg: 36
Assisted suicide - the right to die with dignity
Posted: 11/7/2008 6:50:27 PM

They want the ailing person to stay alive at all costs, physical and monetary, for their own benefit, for they cannot bear to let them go.


I have seen this with many dog owners. Personally, I prefer dead animals to one that live in a chronic state of suffering.


I have already made the conscious decision that if I am found to have a terminal illness, with absolutely no hope, that I would not be either a burden to my children or society. I do not believe in "assisted suicide" but am of the firm belief that the one with the illness should try to take charge.


I do not believe in assisted suicided says the person who is abled bodied and wants to be in contron and in charge right up to the end, but remember our circumstances can change in an instant - in the blink of eye. Aneurysm, car crash, stroke. None of us know what is coming our way. We can only hope.
 Ticketoride
Joined: 6/3/2004
Msg: 38
Assisted suicide - the right to die with dignity
Posted: 11/7/2008 11:28:24 PM
I'm sure it won't be long before the Gov't gives the green Light, since many States are following Suit, as their Gov'ts are also tired of getting robbed keeping the Living Dead alive.

Next, a "Do-it-yourself" Suicide Kit widely Available from your local Funeral Parlor "Check-Out" Vending Outlet. The Vacation Package Deal to Hell would incl. psychedelic Cyanide & a Vase. One simply throws a few Coins into the Machine, lies down on the folding-out Bed-Drawer, pops the Pill, and when the Body Temperature drops below 20 Degrees, the Incinerator Tray automatically draws the Corpse in and nukes you into the Vase. A brief computerized Eulogy (Microsoft Undertaker 2009 Corporate Edition) is played before you are flushed down the Sewer.

Make sure you leave a sizeable Tax & Credit Card Debt and keep and few Nickels in your Pocket before you notify the aforementioned unsecured Creditors of your scheduled Departure, so you'll have at least a few weeping Attendees blessing your Journey into the Afterlife.
 IncognitoGuido
Joined: 10/19/2007
Msg: 40
Assisted suicide - the right to die with dignity
Posted: 11/12/2008 12:16:06 PM
Interesting article in the Province today (Sept 12 Page A27) about a teenager in London England that has won the right to die at home after refusing to have a heart transplant the hospital she was at tried to force on her. She has had a rare for of lukemia since she was five and is tired of being in the hospital.

Might be a good sign...
 Ticketoride
Joined: 6/3/2004
Msg: 41
Assisted suicide - the right to die with dignity
Posted: 11/12/2008 12:29:53 PM
sounds like you're not real big on the assisted suicide thing.

Read earlier Posts I made on this Thread.

I've got a pirated copy of Undertaker 2002. Is there any way to upgrade it?

You can download the "Welcome Back" Resuscitation Plug-in/Add-on in the Event of a
"Fatal Error: Cannot Terminate User" Screen Message to abort the Eulogy ... lol

Interesting article in the Province today (Sept 12 Page A27) about a teenager in London England that has won the right to die at home after refusing to have a heart transplant the hospital she was at tried to force on her. She has had a rare for of lukemia since she was five and is tired of being in the hospital.

Cool !!! Looks like it required divine Legal Intervention to give the Medicos a Wake-up Call and stop robbing the Taxpayer for Services that are not wanted. You have to go to Court now to stop them from milking the Public Purse. Ridiculous, no Concept of the Quality of Life.
 Xavery
Joined: 4/22/2007
Msg: 53
Assisted suicide - the right to die with dignity
Posted: 3/6/2009 6:38:57 PM
Washington State is the second American state to legalize assisted suicide. I am not sure if this good or bad. I have a feeling in order to be granted the right to end your life, you need to be in very ill.

I don't think anyone decides against suicide does so because they are worried about breaking the law. However, if a person is really ill, they may need help ending their life.

I think we will see more and more states and provinces legalize assisted suicide.

Again, I am not sure if it is good or bad. All I know is that I would never want to be so ill that I would be considering this as an option.

Thoughts?

(I don't usually search for threads when I write a thread based on a current event. There is an online pole today on a radio's station website asking: Would you be in support of assisted suicide in Canada? On the other hand, I totally forgot about this thread and could have posted this as an update her, which I have now done.)
 Wild Sweet and Cool
Joined: 1/31/2009
Msg: 54
Assisted suicide - the right to die with dignity
Posted: 3/6/2009 7:33:08 PM
We put pets down when they suffer but don't show human beings the same mercy. i made a pact with my ex that if one of us ends up lying there like mr potato head drooling and helpless and no brain activity the other has to kill them. i'd probably be the only one with the jam to actually do it though. hmmmmmm....
 Xavery
Joined: 4/22/2007
Msg: 55
Assisted suicide - the right to die with dignity
Posted: 3/6/2009 7:55:47 PM
^Maybe, but it kind of takes a certain level of courage to stand by and watch others suffer. Actual, I think people rationalize their suffering.

I think we put down too many pets. I guess the fear with assisted suicide is that we would start putting down everyone and their dog.
 mrchicken
Joined: 5/16/2008
Msg: 56
Assisted suicide - the right to die with dignity
Posted: 3/8/2009 11:51:37 AM
Humans do not hold dominion over thier own lives thats right.
The right to die is not ours, and never was; ain't that a kick in the head eh?
 Xavery
Joined: 4/22/2007
Msg: 58
Assisted suicide - the right to die with dignity
Posted: 3/10/2009 6:50:02 PM
^ I agree. I do not think it will take centuries for it be be legalized in North America though. I think perhaps a couple decades - if that.

I also agree that while I would not want to use such an exit strategy, there is some comfort in knowing that there is one. I suppose most people have thought: I would not want to live if X, Y or Z happened to me. For many of us, you could say that we are only in the world conditionally.
 mrchicken
Joined: 5/16/2008
Msg: 62
Assisted suicide - the right to die with dignity
Posted: 3/13/2009 10:31:18 PM
Halo, I only need to know one thing, and I might be able to die satisfied.
If necessary, would you be willing to nurish me as in "The Grapes of Wrath"?
 rockondon
Joined: 2/21/2007
Msg: 65
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Assisted suicide - the right to die with dignity
Posted: 11/16/2009 2:16:26 PM
The last episode of House touched on this issue too.
At one time I felt that health care workers should try to save everybody. More and more I realize how barbaric that is in some cases - I am often horrified at the long, slow, tortuous agony that some patients endure - their bodies kept alive by chemicals and machines which reduces the human experience to little more than inflicting pain and removing dignity.
 mcalgary
Joined: 11/10/2009
Msg: 66
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Assisted suicide - the right to die with dignity
Posted: 11/29/2009 1:32:36 AM
The problem with legalizing this is that it opens a pandora's box. As with Same sex marriage laws have made it hard to prosecute polygamy, allowing assisted suicide makes too many other things open. If the law was very specific and outlined exactly what ailments would qualify and at what point, then I am all for it but if it only says non curable diseases I am not.
 TheAngelGabriel
Joined: 4/27/2008
Msg: 67
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Assisted suicide - the right to die with dignity
Posted: 12/2/2009 9:40:28 PM
Society wants to control every instance of our lives right down to our very existence. I believe that we should all be given the right to choose life or death at ANY point during our existence. People will argue that suicide is wrong but who are people to make that decision for me? They weren't there when I was born, or when I had to suffer, so why is there decision when I get to go?

I am in favour of assisted suicide and although many doctors won't admit it, so are they.
 mcalgary
Joined: 11/10/2009
Msg: 69
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Assisted suicide - the right to die with dignity
Posted: 12/4/2009 11:39:52 PM
One problem with all this comes up with a situation where the medical costs or other financial matters are adding up and people either start to feel an obligation to there families to reduce costs or are even pressured or talked into suicide. Don't tell me this wouldn't happen. It definantly would. How do you prevent it is the question. You must realize that many young woman are pressured into an abortion. I personally know 2 friends of mine when I was 19 who were pressured (one by her parents and the other by the family medical clinic). And assisted suicide is very much like abortion. This post has nothing to do with abortion, I am only using it as a similar example. I am totally pro-choice so please don't try and twist it.
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