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Show ALL Forums  > UK forums  > Swine Flu? Is our NHS reactive when they should be proactive?      Home login  
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 pantsonfire
Joined: 7/19/2006
Msg: 10
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Swine Flu? Is our NHS reactive when they should be proactive?Page 1 of 3    (1, 2, 3)
* Beats Kath to a pulp for her cheek...

I live in Solihull which has now joined Sandwell, Coventry and Birmingham in being designated an "area of widespread community transmission".



Solihull has now joined Birmingham, Coventry and Sandwell as an "area of widespread community transmission".

The Health Protection agency has assessed Solihull as an 'area of widespread community transmission' ("ACT"). This means that the level of swine flu activity has increased so that a different approach to slowing the spread of disease is now required.

Cases can now be diagnosed on clinical grounds rather than depending on a laboratory test. In most cases the diagnosis is being made over the telephone by a GP or NHS Direct

GPs will prescribe Tamiflu as necessary. Tracing of contacts and using Tamiflu as a preventative measure is no longer required.

Schools will not be closed except in exceptional circumstances.

For most people, swine flu remains a milder illness than was previously thought and most people can help themselves by taking over-the-counter remedies. Aspirin should not be given to under 16s.

People in these high risk groups should seek medical advice as soon as they notice swine flu symptoms: those with long-term lung, kidney, neurological, liver or heart disease; children under five; people over 65; those with diabetes mellitus; the immunosuppressed (whether caused by disease or treatment); patients who have had drug treatment for asthma within the past three years; and pregnant women.

If anyone is worried in any way they should go online and check their symptoms on http://www.nhs.uk/, call NHS Direct (0845 46 47) or call the Swine Flu information line on 0800 1 513 513. If they are still concerned, they should then call their GP, who can provide advice over the phone.

The message for everyone is: If you have flu symptoms, stay at home and limit contact. If you do not have symptoms, carry on as normal.

The symptoms of flu are:

A high temperature and feverishness plus two or more of these symptoms:

cough,
sore throat,
runny nose,
limb or joint pain,
headache,
vomiting or
diarrhoea.
Media Release issued by Solihull NHS Care Trust. For further information please contact the Communications Team on 0121 712 8308.



No pamphlet came through my door, nor the doors of anyone I know.... The only literature pertaining to Swine flu that I have received has come from my son's secondary school...

Other than that, we get a regular, 'record number of new cases of swine flu diagnosed' update on the local news and very little else...
 badge73
Joined: 1/17/2009
Msg: 13
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Swine Flu? Is our NHS reactive when they should be proactive?
Posted: 7/14/2009 7:34:12 AM
As redditch was one of the first hit i was expecting a bigger impact off the government, i wont hold my breath lol then again i look around the town and can see why its spread easily. Gangs of mothers crowded into maccys with there kids, one sneeze and all infected. As mac said how many kids are taught to sneeze into bog roll or wash hands regular? Most redditch people are beyond help with out swine flu never mind with!
 restless_native
Joined: 12/17/2006
Msg: 25
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Swine Flu? Is our NHS reactive when they should be proactive?
Posted: 7/14/2009 4:09:18 PM
People need to just get a little perspective. It's not an outbreak of the black death that we're talking about. Just something that might put you in bed for a couple of days with a fever.

If anything needless pressure is being put on NHS resources by panicking halfwits demanding action because they think they have a bit of a sniffle.
 restless_native
Joined: 12/17/2006
Msg: 27
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Swine Flu? Is our NHS reactive when they should be proactive?
Posted: 7/14/2009 6:21:06 PM

I wonder if you are a single parent of a child whose temperature is not coming down and is not eating and is not responding well how would you react ???????


I'm not in that position and neither are the vast majority of other people. The risk is that resources could be diverted from people like those you mention by others who are needlessly putting a strain on the system.


This happened to my friend, her boy was really badly, constantly vomiting, not eating and with high temperature for days and dehydrated and needed emergency attention twice.


How would you feel if your friends boy didn't get immediate medical treatment because all the medical staff were busy dealing with people who just felt a bit off colour?
 gemini_lady_uk
Joined: 7/16/2008
Msg: 41
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Swine Flu? Is our NHS reactive when they should be proactive?
Posted: 7/25/2009 6:54:52 AM
RobinsonUK - I think the main difference with Swine Flu and 'regular' every day flu is that it is out of season (generally people get hit by flu in the winter) and the fact it spreads so easily. Yes there may be a great many people die from 'regular' flu but if this one spreads so easily, how many more will die.

Regular strains of flu causes a fair amount of disruption in the winter months ie people taking time off work, complications for people with previous medical history ie asthma, poor immune systems or the old or very young. Additional work for GP's, hospitals.

Swine flu is causing disruption already, how much worse will it be over the winter months when people are more susceptible.

Normally in the office I work, people with mild flu symptoms still go in and just get on with things (although they shouldn't really) - and yes, possibly pass flu onto one or two others.

With Swine flu, it's likely to be passed to the majority, I know many people will say big deal, they will just get over it - and they will - only what about the nursing homes and physically vulnerable people they in turn pass it on to.

My daughter has ME therefore her immune system struggles to cope, my gran is 94 - for them any flu puts them at risk - it's not that Swine flu is necessarily worse than 'regular' flu - it is the ease with which it can be passed on.
 Bluesman2008
Joined: 4/2/2008
Msg: 64
Swine Flu? Is our NHS reactive when they should be proactive?
Posted: 8/16/2009 5:34:24 AM

All I'm saying is don't follow everything the government, pharmaceutical companies and WHO say. They've screwed up plenty before and have their own agenda.


The lady is right. Anyone remember Thalidimide? Google that one for a refresher. Then read this article about this, our latest "panic". Personally, I trust government about as far as I can throw it. Any government. And I trust government a lot less than youtube these days. With so many credible neuro scientists screaming about the danger of this "vaccine", that I'll not be rolling my sleeves up any time soon except perhaps to wash my hands. With friends like the drug companies, who needs enemies.

http://www.dailyrecord.com/article/20090816/OPINION03/90814054/1005/NEWS01/Swine-flu-panic-an-absurd-falsehood---
 Wiyan
Joined: 12/8/2008
Msg: 65
Swine Flu? Is our NHS reactive when they should be proactive?
Posted: 9/24/2009 7:22:34 PM
a source of info other than media hype: www.projectcamelot.org/jane_burgermeister.html--very informational and empowering too!
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