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 justwant2no
Joined: 11/14/2007
Msg: 1
grass fed beefPage 1 of 2    (1, 2)
After reading countless articles on the benefits of grass fed beef vs. grainfed beef - topped off with an article on how even the plastic the grocery store wraps their meat in is bad for you - I decided to find a butcher and buy a grass fed steer. Not having the freezer space or cashflow to warrant an entire steer, I found several like minded friends and we split it. Now I understand that grass fed beef is leaner than grain fed to begin with - and the fact that this steer was butchered in the spring, leads me to believe it may have been even leaner than usual (it was a very harsh winter - several feet of snow). So the beef is a bit tough, and the ground beef (at 90% lean) is rather dry. No one has complained, but because I found the butcher, made the arrangements etc., I feel responsible. So my question is - does anyone have recipe suggestions to help tenderize the meat? I'd made sirloin tips and gravey that was pretty good - but I'd like to offer suggestions to my friends. One said she'd made a pot roast - cooked it for several hours over two day and it never 'fell apart' the way they usually do.
Any suggestions?
 dirsup
Joined: 9/28/2005
Msg: 2
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grass fed beef
Posted: 4/13/2010 7:48:34 AM
If I were you I would contact a butcher that works with both grain fed AND grass fed
beef. There are lots of them. I live in extreme NE MT., 14 miles from the Canadian border and most of the thousands of cattle in this area are usually fed grass and not
getting grain until they go to the "fattening" lots before they go to the slaughter.
Most of the real good farm/ranch beef up here is grass fed.
Talking about cold, it is not uncommon for it to get to -40 to -55 here in the winder and
that is without the wind chill. Most of the ranchers here ship their cattle to "feed lots"
starting as soon as Oct and are invariably done shipping by thanksgiving.
 smartypants24
Joined: 8/3/2009
Msg: 3
grass fed beef
Posted: 4/13/2010 8:30:19 AM
Marinating meats always helps with tenderness. Usually something with vinegar or lemon/lime juice...barbecue sauce and salad dressing work in a pinch. Coat the meat, and let it sit for about an hour, then cook as desired.

If you have a meat mallet...go to town! I buy tougher cuts of beef to save money, trim off all the visible fat, pound it with a meat mallet then drain off fat from cooking to reduce the amount of saturated fat going into my body...it works for me
 texasbaby
Joined: 7/21/2005
Msg: 4
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grass fed beef
Posted: 4/13/2010 8:41:58 AM
Non-store bought beef - help
This is another thread on sort of the same subject, I think it's back on around page 20.
It's not a long thread, but does have some ideas you might find informative.

tb
 arwen52
Joined: 3/13/2008
Msg: 5
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grass fed beef
Posted: 4/13/2010 3:38:12 PM
You need to use lower temperatures and not cook the meat as long as you would with meat with a higher fat content. Older recipes will have to be adjusted. The new edition of Joy of Cooking will give recipes adapted to today's leaner meats. Beef and pork even in conventional groceries have a lower fat content than they did 25 years ago. Keep those rules in mind - lower temp, less cooking time - and you'll be more successful.

Of course, you may just have tough beef, too.

If you are making burgers or meatloaf with the ground beef, add some already cooked rice to it and an egg to hold it together. It will make it more moist.

Steaks and roasts - like I said, use lower temp and cook less well done.


<div class='quote'> If I were you I would contact a butcher that works with both grain fed AND grass fed
beef.
Excellent suggestion.


<div class='quote'>Most of the real good farm/ranch beef up here is grass fed.
. . . Most of the ranchers here ship their cattle to "feed lots"
starting as soon as Oct and are invariably done shipping by thanksgiving.
That's how conventional beef is raised - on grass most of its life. It's then fattened on corn at a feed lot for a few weeks or months before slaughter. Grass fed beef does not go through the corn/feed lot routine at the end. It goes from pasture to slaughterhouse.
 Molly Maude
Joined: 9/11/2008
Msg: 6
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grass fed beef
Posted: 4/13/2010 4:11:13 PM
my parents always raised their own beef (usually Herfords) so they would have total control ... I never liked the taste of the meat on their table and later discovered it was because my Dad had a "thing" for WELL AGED meat ... which was supposed to make the meat more tender ... but the amount of aging also affected the taste ...

I don't pretend to understand that ... but that's one more issue you could discuss with your butcher when you're having the next steer slaughtered ...

I have to admit that, if I put any thought into it, the concept of some stranger or groups of strangers having control over the way the meat is handled that's going to ultimately be on MY table ... makes me a little nervous ... not to also mention the whole "wrapped in plastic" concept ...

I've considered choosing a steer and having him slaughtered, wrapped in paper and frozen ... just for the control I'd feel I had over the beef going into my body ... but then I remember the taste of the meat on my folks' table ... I shudder ... and buy those steaks wrapped in the plastic wrap at the meat market!
 Cheffypoo
Joined: 4/26/2009
Msg: 7
grass fed beef
Posted: 4/13/2010 8:33:12 PM
Watch the movie Food, Inc..grass fed is MUCH better...
 stonemesa
Joined: 2/22/2009
Msg: 8
grass fed beef
Posted: 4/16/2010 2:56:03 PM
cornfed beef rocks. grass fed is for dog food
 FrankNStein902
Joined: 12/26/2009
Msg: 9
grass fed beef
Posted: 4/17/2010 12:32:28 PM

I've always wondered about aging steaks. How are they kept, are they marinated somehow, and how does it make the meat better?

They are kept in a temperature and humidity controlled environment.

They are not marinated and actually marinating is a bit of a myth as it relates to tenderness.

This process allows the beefs natural enzymes break down the connective tissue in the muscle, which will give you a more tender cut of meat.

With the exception of some commercial tenderizers, most liquids or powers are not strong enough to break down the connective tissues in meat.

What something like lime does those is when you are eating it is trigger your sour and bitter receptors that in turn triggers you to salivate.

Your saliva contains enzymes that aid in break the food down and thus the more ingredients that cause you to salivate the more tender a cut of beef may seem.



Could the OP do aging at home, to preserve and/or improve tenderness?

Yep.

Dry off any moisture from cut of beef.

Place in fridge for 3 - 5 days.

Remove beef and trim away grey area and cook.
 dsljim
Joined: 7/2/2011
Msg: 10
grass fed beef
Posted: 1/4/2012 9:13:17 AM
Long Slow cooking, either in the moist smoke of a barbeque or in a large roaster in a 225° oven. I have had great results using coffee in my tuff old venison. I then freeze it, along with some of the liquid, makes a fast meal, then I add barley or rice to the juices and have me some soup.
 caddyman101
Joined: 11/20/2011
Msg: 11
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grass fed beef
Posted: 1/4/2012 9:34:50 AM
i would see if your butcher could age the beef longer about 21-28 days. All your great steakhouse across the country use dry age steak. u can do it yourself. Take a whole primerib roast wrap in cheesecloth and put in a fridge. One that is not open all the time. Like a fridge in the garage. Change the wrap daily at first. Cut off the gray and keep aged it for 7-10 days. With your best cuts, remember oil olive work as a natural tenderizer. Before cooking your steaks rub with olive oil salt pepper and let them come to room temp before grilling them.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 12
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grass fed beef
Posted: 1/4/2012 4:14:26 PM
...I think Caddyman has a very good idea. The beef..particularly a grass fed steer...needs hanging a little longer than a grain fed steer. Using it's own enzymes to tenderize the beef is a time tested procedure.
There is simply no way to get the marbling in grass fed beef that you get in grain fed beef. That's why you hear all the stories about Kobe beef, and the extreme measures used to get that marvelous marbling. I've always wanted to get some Wagyu cows..breed them to some good sized Angus bulls, and feed out the offspring to see if I could get prime carcasses by using some roasted soybeans in the final month to 45 days of being on feed. The additional oil from the soybeans should help build the marbling in the muscle...but they need to be roasted, or the proteins in them aren't easily digestible by cattle.
 Molly Maude
Joined: 9/11/2008
Msg: 13
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grass fed beef
Posted: 1/4/2012 5:03:27 PM
I went to an ag college and, long ago, had the formula for breeding a stable Brangus ... Bramahs bred w/Angus cattle ... it took like 16 generations to make the breed stable ... I never found the time to give it a try ... premise to create cattle that could withstand draught but have good meat ...
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 14
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grass fed beef
Posted: 1/6/2012 5:32:10 AM
Molly...I'm not 100% sure, but I think that's the story behind Santa Gertrudis cattle. They didn't use Angus with the Brahma's...I believe they used Herefords..but the outcome was the same..a breed that can stand heat better and produce better carcasses....
 raxarsr
Joined: 7/10/2008
Msg: 15
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grass fed beef
Posted: 1/6/2012 3:31:38 PM
all i know is that the best......and i do mean the best steak i ever had was in montana in 1979.......lil place right in the middle of the state called the jordan supper club

lol...the cook couldnt believe i wanted it med rare.........according to him...it was still raw[western method of cooking steak..if its brown its still cookin..if its black its almost done]..

the steak was huge.at least a 3 lb t-bone.......it was cut from a 4 yr old hereford/charlois cross steer........out there....the locals wouldnt dream of butchering a steer under 3 yrs old.........and theres nothing but grass to feed on
 dsljim
Joined: 7/2/2011
Msg: 16
grass fed beef
Posted: 1/6/2012 5:05:48 PM
@raxarsr, my friend is in Montana right now working with a rancher that has a construction business to support his ranching. We all know why corn is in everything, if not this is a good weekend to watch foodinc and others.
What's your take on that year long sting operation to catch and destroy that family that sold some milk to an undercover agent?
I don't know the process in 1979 in Montana, but now they ship to feedlots for the last 30 days of the animals life where they are penned up next to feeders full of corn.
 raxarsr
Joined: 7/10/2008
Msg: 17
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grass fed beef
Posted: 1/7/2012 3:38:34 AM
well....if its the story i'm thinking of..........the feds were right for busting them.....their milking system is a sealed one......by opening it to sell milk......they ruin the intrgerty of the sealed system..........while i'm against the "laws" prohibiting selling raw milk.......a sealed system should remain sealed

your right about shipping beef to feed lots.........but that steak came from the owners herd........they keep a few steers for their own use.......and they dont grain feed them
 caddyman101
Joined: 11/20/2011
Msg: 18
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grass fed beef
Posted: 1/7/2012 10:07:27 AM
u can buy raw milk in washington. I just bought some from the health food store the other day.
 daynadaze
Joined: 2/11/2008
Msg: 19
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grass fed beef
Posted: 1/7/2012 12:28:19 PM
I use to live in Iowa, oh how I miss that corn-fed beef! Getting a steak here in New Mexico is a shock, it's not tender and it's not buttery smooth, in fact sometimes I can't even chew it down and have to discreetly remove it instead of swallow it. Gross I know, but that's how I find grass-fed beef to be.
 caddyman101
Joined: 11/20/2011
Msg: 20
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Posted: 1/7/2012 12:56:05 PM
good 2 go nutural food store has it here where i live. 8.49 a gallon. They get it from a local dairy in sequim, wa. Raw Whole organic milk.
 caddyman101
Joined: 11/20/2011
Msg: 21
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grass fed beef
Posted: 1/7/2012 1:06:08 PM
Dungeness Valley Creamery Inc. Raw Jersey Milk. Check it out on the web. I was good S**t.
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