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Show ALL Forums  > UK forums  > should the armed forces be subjected to industrial tribunals?      Home login  
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 badge73
Joined: 1/17/2009
Msg: 1
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should the armed forces be subjected to industrial tribunals?Page 1 of 3    (1, 2, 3)
listening to the news and a debate on radio 2 this afternoon, the subject of employment tribunals.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/8616866.stm

is this the start of a slippery slope? after all when you join the forces you must plainly know what is acceptable and not, plus you dont exactly have a job description.

more importantly do you agree with the tribunals findings? after all she joined with no children and her descision to have children. i do find it disturbing when to many allowences will be accepted after all you are part of a team and relying each other, and dont exactly want to turn your back and find out your mate has gone to feed the kids.
 badge73
Joined: 1/17/2009
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should the armed forces be subjected to industrial tribunals?
Posted: 4/13/2010 12:14:27 PM
If they could have made an effort to try and assist her with childcare then perhaps they wouldn't have been criticised. If your child is ill then I am afraid most people would say kid comes first and I think expecting someone to be available for duty 24 hours a day 7 days a week 365 days a year is somewhat unreasonable.


but thats one of the conditions most would expect being on duty 24/7 as well as being under military law 24/7. wouldnt people know that before joining?


No matter what the job is, employers should make allowances for people who have kids, there's a difference in my view between someone taking the piss and someone who wants to work and is having problems with illness/childcare.


i agree if it was a normal job, but it isnt. you cannot just walk off when some one is ill, even close family. there is a procedure for everything in the army, but the link does not say what was followed and what was not.


I'm sure it won't kill them to pay compensation, however it may set a precedent, but thats the chance employers take when they take someone on, that you'll end up at tribunal somewhere along the line.


this is what i think most will find disturbing as the woman in question could end up receiving more money then some one who has lost a limb or worse in battle.

edit. surely she most of thought about these things before she had the child? and why didnt she take up the other job they offered? would this mean women in the forces can now knock themselves up and claim compo? or will we see an army of buggys flanking dartmoor ranges? lol
 badge73
Joined: 1/17/2009
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should the armed forces be subjected to industrial tribunals?
Posted: 4/14/2010 4:37:53 AM

I dislike the military regime for various reasons, on recruiting young people they don't show the horrors of war only the sports, walking down the beach with the girlfriend or driving round in a tank


well they must be a bit of a numpty if they think its all that, as most people think of war when army is mentioned.


Once you sign the dotted line they can have you working 24/7 and they think they own you. In the event or war there is little suport or recompense for troops injured or killed.


as said earlier post, when you sign up you are under military law and again must be a bit of a numpty not to know this. i agree with the recompense, especially when more money is given to people whose feeling are hurt rather then missing legs.


I have known someone who had been married 5 years and no kids was asked by his CO "Is there a problem?" wtf has it got to do with the military?


ever thought he might be asking as they might need extra help, for example ivf? and if the marrige was going down hill, it is his job to know as it affects working conditions and normally be sent on leave to sort it out.


I think if the military recruit women into the army then they have an obligation to provide child care especially if the person is on detachment for several weeks/months.


the army does provide child care, and she was offered a different job to make things easier. i did read she actually voluntered for afghanistan, which begs the question why? as if she was already having trouble finding child care then surely not going to be the best place or is that logical?

from my time in the forces, the children were looked after by other wives, so presume she peed off a few people and they refused. did hear the racial part is because she said they wouldnt treat a british national in the same way .....
 Cargy.
Joined: 12/26/2008
Msg: 4
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should the armed forces be subjected to industrial tribunals?
Posted: 4/14/2010 7:30:15 AM
Suppose they gave a war and nobody came...

...because they couldn't sort out their childcare arrangements?

 badge73
Joined: 1/17/2009
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should the armed forces be subjected to industrial tribunals?
Posted: 4/15/2010 2:52:43 AM
now she wants over a million pound in compo

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1266069/Now-single-mother-sort-childcare-demands-1-1m--seven-times-Army-offered-hero-lost-legs.html#ixzz0l9T4oqXF

She quit her job as a technician in the 10th Signal Regiment in April 2008 after being disciplined for failing to appear on parade because of childcare difficulties for her daughter Tahlia, now four.

Besides winning her landmark sex discrimination case Miss DeBique also won a claim for race discrimination because Army chiefs did not let her bring her half-sister from the Caribbean - where she was recruited - to look after her child.

Her victory left senior officers facing the nightmare task of having to consider soldiers' childcare problems before giving them orders.

She is claiming over £;1.14million because she argues that she would have stayed in the Army until 2023, instead of being forced to quit her £30,341-a-year job after seven years of service.

The MoD's barrister Keith Morton branded her compensation claim ' perverse' and said it was 'unreasonable' for Miss DeBique to have turned down a posting that offered childcare while applying for lucrative civilian jobs in Afghanistan.

She was offered a 'unique' five-year non-deployable posting to Blandford Army garrison in Dorset, which had childcare facilities, in 2007.

Miss DeBique says she felt unable to accept the posting because she only had four days to make a decision and because of the Army's previous failure to address her childcare needs and instead, handed in her year's notice in April 2007.

Miss Debique, who lives in Tooting, South West London, quit when she was disciplined for failing to be available for duty around the clock. Her commanding officer told her the Army was 'unsuitable for a single mother who couldn't sort out her childcare arrangements'.

The Central London Employment Tribunal panel is due to announce its compensation award tomorrow.
 badge73
Joined: 1/17/2009
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should the armed forces be subjected to industrial tribunals?
Posted: 4/15/2010 9:14:50 AM

the Army is unsuitable for a single mother who couldn't sort out her childcare arrangements'.


he is indeed correct, after all would you want to see infants anywhere near the front line?


she is being directly discriminated against because of her sex.


so if a male soldier does not turn up on parade he should not get a charge? after all you cannot have one rule for one and one for the other.


Then again, what does an ET judge know compared to the great minds of the forum!


maybe some great minds on the forum have served time in the forces so actually know what they are on about. but maybe there are a few who have never served yet know what forces life is about?
 Marmite baby
Joined: 5/19/2007
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should the armed forces be subjected to industrial tribunals?
Posted: 4/15/2010 11:55:02 AM
Yes, but people should have back up schemes for child care. Feel like a traitor to my sex but where I work some mums have alot more time off for domestic reasons than others. Same employer but if you get on with boss, more time off, with salary. Several people are paid by the hour and again there is favouritism.
To be honest, think the law is based on how well you get on with your boss. Shouldn't be but even with Legalation people wh9o aren't in the in crowd would be going to court Whereas others take time off without worrying.
 badge73
Joined: 1/17/2009
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should the armed forces be subjected to industrial tribunals?
Posted: 4/16/2010 8:42:03 AM
it seems shes a bit disappointed with the pay out of 17k and did not think it was enough

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/8625446.stm

hopefully this will put a bit of a stop to others or at least make them think twice of their actions.
 Cargy.
Joined: 12/26/2008
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should the armed forces be subjected to industrial tribunals?
Posted: 4/18/2010 5:01:06 AM
If someone isn't able to do what a job requires, irrespective of what that job is, then they aren't suitable for the role.

The words "one-legged man" (or woman) and "arse-kicking contest" spring to mind.
 badge73
Joined: 1/17/2009
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should the armed forces be subjected to industrial tribunals?
Posted: 4/18/2010 6:42:45 AM
after thinking about this case and i could do with a few quid for a holiday, i might apply for my old job back in the army, after all if they say no i could take them to court under the disability act and age discrimination? after all most R.S.Ms walk round with a stick, so if they can do it, so can i
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