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Show ALL Forums  > Relationships  > Vegetarians - how do you feel about your SO cooking meat?      Home login  
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 moraima
Joined: 6/26/2005
Msg: 2
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Vegetarians - how do you feel about your SO cooking meat?Page 1 of 9    (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9)
"I've always had pretty strong views on the matter "

"Assuming it's a serious relationship, living together or spending considerable time together "

Whether it be vegetarian versus meat eater, or any other issue of incompatiblity, I have to ask Op why would anyone be a relationship with a person who they have strong views that the other person doesn't have the right to be who they are?

If you have strong views about embracing being a veretarian, why not just date vegetarians?

I am type O blood which means meat is naturally something I enjoy eating. I would date a vegetarian and be interested in the meal they cook. It would be no problem for me to enjoy their food once in a while. I wouldn't allow them to change my diet, and certainly wouldn't date them if they had strong views of the matter.
 Smarts and Heart
Joined: 12/15/2009
Msg: 3
Vegetarians - how do you feel about your SO cooking meat?
Posted: 9/4/2010 8:30:42 PM
My oldest son's girlfriend is a vegetarian and he isn't, nor is anyone else in our family or her's for that matter. When they come over for dinner I respect her choices and ensure that I have vegetables mixed with pasta or rice or tofu, salad, cheese and olives as well as any meat dish for the rest of us. It really isn't difficult for a vegetarian to co-exist if there is mutual respect for each other's choices. It's a personal choice.

If she were to be really outspoken, obnoxious and against others eating meat in front of her she'd find herself pretty lonely eating by herself!
 iherdcats
Joined: 6/15/2006
Msg: 7
Vegetarians - how do you feel about your SO cooking meat?
Posted: 9/4/2010 9:11:31 PM
I am a long time vegetarian, that is my choice. Generally that is how i cook, however there are several times a year that I will cook meat for my guests (I am told that I make a delicious turkey and an amazing salmon dish.) I forget how they taste, but my guests leave nothing behind.
To eat or not eat meat is a very personal choice, not one that makes an individual righteous.
 DartmouthRunner
Joined: 3/5/2009
Msg: 10
Vegetarians - how do you feel about your SO cooking meat?
Posted: 9/4/2010 10:06:10 PM

I like my home to be a meat-free sanctuary.


Then you should be looking for a relationship with another vegetarian, plain and simple.

If you are willing to pursue a serious, long-term relationship with someone, you have to respect their views and beliefs. Yes, you can accept a significant other eating meat in social situations, that's cool. However, if the relationship progresses to a point where you are living together, then your home is just not your home(unless it is in your name alone), it is their home as well and in all fairness and equality they should be allowed to have meat in the home. Well, unless you are allergic to meat...then it is a health issue.

So if that is a big issue, then don't date people who eat meat.
 Padawan61
Joined: 3/1/2008
Msg: 12
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Vegetarians - how do you feel about your SO cooking meat?
Posted: 9/5/2010 4:35:09 AM
I've never cared what guys ate - as long as meat doesn't enter my house

Heavens forbid if you ever got into a serious relationship with (or worse - married!!) an uncivilized carnivore ... the house would become joint ownership (as both are contributors to the mortgage and expenses) so it's not really YOUR house. As another poster said ... "militant vegans" are such a turn-off. The best solution is to date your own kind.
 Pingshooter
Joined: 3/15/2009
Msg: 15
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Vegetarians - how do you feel about your SO cooking meat?
Posted: 9/5/2010 8:02:02 AM

I've never cared what guys ate - as long as meat doesn't enter my house. I'm much more concerned with guys being childfree and having compatible personalities.


Unless they brought meat into "your" house. Seems like you want your cake and eat it too, sorta. If you have no problem with guys eating meat out, but do in "your" house, you don't have much of a compatible personality, if the guy wanted to have a few friends over to grill some burgers and dogs, huh?
 beehearnow
Joined: 9/28/2007
Msg: 16
Vegetarians - how do you feel about your SO cooking meat?
Posted: 9/5/2010 9:19:43 AM
I'm in agreement with the other posters...you should only be serious with someone who shares your food requirements if you can't be flexible where their food habits diverge from yours.

Just like any of those other compatibility points; politics, religion, and treatment others to name a few. Oh, I'm also in agreement with those posters who are pointing out you may be a bit of a hypocrite if you feed your cat indoors.
 Dare to
Joined: 2/11/2009
Msg: 23
Vegetarians - how do you feel about your SO cooking meat?
Posted: 9/5/2010 4:53:26 PM
I've never cared what guys ate - as long as meat doesn't enter my house.

I don't care in the least if a guy likes to listen to death metal - but I definitely don't want to be forced to listen to it at home when I'm trying to read. Is that contradictory?
Yes that is contradictory. It's sending a very mixed message to your potential boyfriends. You don't mind them having their own tastes and interests as long as they don't have them when you're around!! So what happens if you ever decide to live with one of these men? Is he now no longer "allowed" to eat the meat he loves and play the music he likes, and probably dozens of other "restictions" that you would suddenly come up with. A relationship involves compromise.. And that doesn't mean the guy does all the compromising and you do none....

It would be like a man who eats meat refusing to let you eat veges because he doesn't like the smell... How would you deal with that?? Don't like it??? Wouldn't accept it??? Well that is exactly what you are asking of him... Doesn't sound so simplistic and "fair" once you turn it around and see how you would deal with the situation in reverse now does it?
 JP1111
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 24
Vegetarians - how do you feel about your SO cooking meat?
Posted: 9/5/2010 5:01:51 PM
I hear you having your strong views!

If you partner want to eat meat then, why should you impose your lifestyle on him? If he wants to eat meat, wouldn't be his choice regardless of what you feel is right to eat?
 CoolBreezez
Joined: 8/20/2006
Msg: 26
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Vegetarians - how do you feel about your SO cooking meat?
Posted: 9/5/2010 6:13:41 PM
Vegetarianism can be a good diet as long as your diet is high in diversified vegetable proteins to get the full range that you need. There is also the issue of iron intake as well, which can be supplemented.

But humans are generally omnivores and eat a mixture of meat and vegetables. I have know a few vegetarians and harsh reactions to any to any kind of meat present may have an underlying issue. In my experience it seems to happen more to women- they get queasy about eating meat.

A fear of meat or Carnophobia may be at work. A person that cannot tolerate the thought of eating any may suffer from this. Yes raw meat can contain diseases but so can some vegetables as well. A little proper handling and preparation can deal with this.

I have had friends that were vegetarians and would respect their wishes. But myself- I don't think I would want to live with one that was really hardline about it. I like the food that I like. Still may of us could do with more vegetables in our diets and less meat- so going part way wouldn't be a problem for me.
 moraima
Joined: 6/26/2005
Msg: 31
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Vegetarians - how do you feel about your SO cooking meat?
Posted: 9/5/2010 11:39:28 PM
"Does this whole random-family-sacrificing-everything-they-have-to-feed-a-wealthy-foreigner-they-know-nothing-about thing really happen that often? "

Actually, it happens to me on a regular basis. Probably because they have an interest in getting to know me better, and I have the same interest in them. (If I have to explain that to you, you probably won't understand anyway.)

""I'm not technically allergic to meat, but eating it would make me very sick due to not eating if for 12 years" "

What do you base that assumption on? My opinion is that the only thing that would case you to get sick is in your mind.

"I'd rather offend someone than end up in some third world hospital. "

The Third World Country that I spend the most time in have a medical system that is highly respected in Canada. I know this because I check with many doctors here in Canada before I started taking medical aid, and find out what type of medical aid was needed.

I was once served an endangered turtle meat. Of course, I ate it even though I have a medical issue with salt, not to mention an issue with eating an endangered species. I would not more turn up my nose at a meal under those circumstance, than I would turn my nose up at medical help by assuming it wasn't good enough.

It is not up to me to impose control on others. I wouldn't accept control attempts layed on me whether it was a food issue or any other issue. Why another would date people that they aren't compatible with is something I don't understand.
 Rythmn
Joined: 1/21/2006
Msg: 36
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Vegetarians - how do you feel about your SO cooking meat?
Posted: 9/6/2010 2:29:41 AM
None of the men in my life have been vegetarian, including my two husbands and the man I am currently dating. In all instances, I did/do not cook red meat, but they (and my children) were free to do it. I also do not buy meat, but they were free to do it.

What ended up, is that for the most part chicken or fish got cooked in my home, as well as vegetarian dishes. At certain points my kids did not eat meat either, as they were adopted and already vegetarian. However, as they grew older they did start to eat meat in college and now only one is vegetarian (most of the time, at any rate).

My ancient black iron pots were off limits for use, given they absorb the flavors of what is cooked in them. We actually had meat pots that were kept separate. For the most part, any red meat was eaten out (by the meat eaters" choice and rarely). They also washed the meat dishes before putting in the dish washer to eliminate the smell.

My significant others became accustomed to what I cooked. When dating and going to my SO's house for dinner, in all instances they cooked what I liked to eat. It was never a big issue for me or for the man in my life. The good things we had at that time, outweighed the inconvenience to all.

When I was younger, I had periods of veganism, vegetarianism, pescatarianism and now I also eat chicken. I personally have not had red meat for almost 40 years. I do demand fan on, as I hate the "smell" of red meat cooking. Actually took me a while to even consider chicken. I also am not thrilled to kiss someone after he eats a steak. However, this was discussed beforehand and never was a problem. All the men in my life also cooked and for the most part, were happy with what I cooked. Occasionally, when my diet was stricter, my husband would cook chicken or fish, if I did not.

As to dealing with the morality of it all, since I started into this mostly around animal rights, I would say that the good influence of my cooking affected my mates and family to eat "less" of what they did or would have w/o me involved. Also, they made efforts to only buy meat that was humanely raised.

AS with everything else, I suppose it is easier if my mate and I shared a lot of practices. But, I am more concerned with the person, his character, his intelligence, his humor and how he treats me. All that is hard enough to find, so I'm not angsting about the rest.
 beehearnow
Joined: 9/28/2007
Msg: 37
Vegetarians - how do you feel about your SO cooking meat?
Posted: 9/6/2010 6:06:24 AM

My understanding has always been that your stomach stops producing enzymes it doesn't need gradually, such as the ones used to break down meats, dairy, etc.


My personal experience - having gone from omnivore to vegetarian to omnivore a few times in my life - is that eating small amounts of any meat as a part of a multi ingredient dinner as would be served in the "third world" example would not make you hospital sick - as another posted stated, it would be more like general malaise, constipation for a few days and perhaps a headache as actual physical symptoms. The taste would be odd. Anything more serious would be a mental reaction (which I acknowledge can be more serious than the physical one).

As far as me or a roommate cooking meat when I was a vegetarian (or when I was a meat eater and they were not) - no problem. And with my friends now who are vegan, flexitarian, vegetarian, red meat only eaters, eaters of whatever floats their boat: I find it's not difficult to intergrate diets, even on the same table, as long as everyone respects each others food choices. And it leads to some very interesting meals and some fun cooking adventures

As in all personal choices, it's the proselyzers and the "do as I do" ers that cause the problems.
 moraima
Joined: 6/26/2005
Msg: 38
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Vegetarians - how do you feel about your SO cooking meat?
Posted: 9/6/2010 9:37:53 AM
"I have to agree with the op to an extent here if she suddenly ate a steak on hormones or some processed meat pork snouts."

Hopefully, meat eaters find a meat source that is hormone free, and isn't processed. One easy way is to eat meat in the third world country I go to, as it is free range and is tender, and sweet.

I read an interesting research article from the U 0f G on the subject of how antibiotic are absorbed into vegetables, grains etc. because of the fertizilers (cow manure) used to grow the vegetables.

From what I have read here from the opening post to the next pages, this thread is actually about tolerance or lack there off of vegetarians about being in a relationship with a meat eater.

The thread goes on the show a lack of understand and intolerance for anyone who doesn't comply to certain vegetarians and their meat ban.

As stated by several posts, the answer is simple............don't date anyone who doesn't think like you do.

ps. I seem to be right about some not understanding the example of people gifting a meal to foreign guest. Actually, that misunderstand of the point, is the same misunderstand of expections of the thread to ban meat from their home (or their world).
 Codeguru
Joined: 9/29/2009
Msg: 39
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Vegetarians - how do you feel about your SO cooking meat?
Posted: 9/6/2010 1:33:43 PM
As a meat-eater, I wouldn't have a relationship with a vegetarian. Sorry.


That's my take on it too. It just doesn't make sense. Humans are omnivores and you are depriving your body of something it was built to metabolize. The reasons behind which are so rediculous I've never actually heard a good reason yet. And then there are those vegetarians who will eat fish too? So fish don't count when it comes to animal worship? It's a big mess of stupid crap I'd just assume avoid all together in the dating world. It's not worth the time and effort or aggravation...

Codeguru
 jojoaus
Joined: 10/28/2007
Msg: 40
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Vegetarians - how do you feel about your SO cooking meat?
Posted: 9/6/2010 3:27:25 PM
To actually answer the OP question....
I was veggo for 25 years. My daughter, 18, has always been a vegetarian. At one point her non-veggo b/f lived with us and I had bo problems actually cooking meat for him on occasion. I wasn't wild about the smell, but hey... I opened the windows and voila!! I have recently (last 2 years) introduced a limited amount of meat back into my diet (chicken and fish) but its rare. So... if I could not only accept a carnivorous teen in my home but actually cook some meat for him, I would have no problems 'allowing' my SO to do the same. Thus far he has been delighted to eat my vegetarian offerings though.

On a side note. I took my kiddo to see a good friend in Italy. The friend knew we were vegetarian but still cooked us a beef lasagna as a welcome meal. Did we eat it?? He!! yes! Would have been rude not to. Didn't even have to ask my daughter- she understood it would have hurt my friends' feelings to refuse. I don't do militant vegetarianism :)
 Dare to
Joined: 2/11/2009
Msg: 43
Vegetarians - how do you feel about your SO cooking meat?
Posted: 9/6/2010 8:37:54 PM

As a meat-eater, I wouldn't have a relationship with a vegetarian. Sorry.
I wouldn't go as far as this.... But if the vegetarian i was dating or living with decided he was going to start telling me what i could eat and when then he would have to go...

In my home i will eat what i want to eat and my partner should eat what he wants to eat, not have some restrictive rule by one party that only THEY have the right to dictate what kind of food is consumed or cooked. THEY are allowed to eat whatever they please but i have to hide my food in a little corner somewhere??? I don't think so!! That's not a good relationship, that's a dictatorship... OP i'm really surprised you can't see that. You seem quite intelligent but you still think it is ok for you to have more rights than your partner... I don't know why you don't just stick to vegetarians instead of ramming your lifestyle and rigid rules down a meateaters throat........
 Ideoform
Joined: 9/23/2007
Msg: 48
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Vegetarians - how do you feel about your SO cooking meat?
Posted: 9/7/2010 7:33:06 AM
I had a vegetarian boyfriend who complained about the smell of meat cooking in restaurants.
And my son is vegetarian, until recently when he was willing to try some bacon. But his main issue was the smell of meat. However, he is Autistic and has lots of trouble with trying new foods, and also has had other issues in general around food.

As a former vegetarian for 16 years, the smell was never an issue for me. I don't eat a lot of meat now, but I noticed that it is stressful trying to cook for everyone.

I have worried that my Autistic son would not get enough protein because he refuses to eat enough of other kinds of protein for a balanced diet. Plus, there is always the pressure to help him to be as "normal" as possible, and unfortunately, normal in this country is eating meat, or at least tolerating being around meat eating and occasionally eating meat. Eating is such a social activity, and Autistics have trouble with social anything, so trying to get him to be around meat has actually been a therapy activity for him, even though I personally lean towards vegetarianism.

And so, here's me, mostly vegetarian, trying to coax my Autistic son into eating some meat almost daily. I thought that chicken or eggs would be the easiest, so I started with those, but he has an extremely sensitive sense of smell and the eggs were completely out. If I make eggs he leaves the kitchen, (and acts like its painful to smell it) and can't eat with us until the eggs are gone and the plates put in the dishwasher.

Sensory issues are a big problem for Autistics, and so there was also an issue with the chicken, because of the texture. I tried sensory desensitization (going extremely slowly with very tiny bits of food, and starting with just looking at it and touching it, ect...) But after a year, I gave up on that one. Then about ten years after starting with trying to have him eat meats, he hit puberty, and because he was much more hungry, I tried again with bacon. I figured, who doesn't like bacon? (Well amongst meat-eaters, anyway.)

So finally he was eating a small amount of bacon. And then my boyfriend would come over and I would have to think about the smell of cooking bacon in the house. Even with an exhaust fan, you really can't hide the smell of cooking bacon...do I feed my son or my boyfriend? I ended up alternating days between them. (I also buy pre-cooked bacon sometimes, but unfortunately, the pre-cooked doesn't have the grass-fed, organic kind of meat I prefer.) Anyway, this really highlighted the whole issue for me. Maybe it was karma, me having to worry so much about what to cook, when to cook, how to cook and how to deal with the cooking odours.

I remember going home to Thanksgiving as a vegetarian in my early 20's. My Mom had worked all day cooking an elaborate meal, the most complex of which was the meat component. I didn't talk about being a vegetarian much, or why I was a vegetarian back then. I just hoped to "sneak under the radar" and hoped that no one would bring up the subject or notice what I was (not) eating. I had plenty to eat because there are always lots of great side-dishes, but nevertheless, my Mom was all concerned that I was well-fed, and not uncomfortable.

I didn't understand back then all the worry. Probably because it was many years before I hosted a Thanksgiving dinner myself. Then I understood. People who do all the cooking are sensitive, even defensive, because its a lot of work, involves quite a bit of planning, and you have to take all of your guest's tastes into consideration. You have to be the "hostess," gracious and welcoming, and a big part of that is feeding your guests. (I guess it calms them and keeps them from figuratively eating each other....)

The main reason for all this thought and preparation is not just to FEED people, because everyone nowadays has more than enough to eat, and plenty of places to go eat out. (Years ago there weren't any fast food restaurants, and half the population didn't really know how to cook -- mainly the men.) But now that isn't the case. And one of the reasons is, I think, that at most holidays, the meal is a big subject of conversation...what kind of Turkey it is, the recipes, how did it get cooked, how good it smells, and all the small talk that goes around food, cooking and eating... sorta like this thread.

The thing with most foods is that smell is a huge component of taste.
I took anatomy and physiology in college, and neuro-psychiatry, and they have discovered that more than half of our sense of how something tastes is really the smell of it. Taste and smell go together in our brains to make the experience of eating. If someone looses their sense of smell, things won't taste good anymore, and often they loose weight. This is one of the reasons smokers loose weight...they loose their sense of smell and food doesn't taste as good.

I once had a roommate that had lost her sense of smell in an accident, and she was very underweight -- looked anorexic -- but she claimed it was from the lack of her sense of smell, and not emotional issues. She also said that more than once she had gotten food poisoning from not being able to tell when food had spoiled. And so our sense of smell has a lot to do with survival. If something doesn't smell right...doesn't smell like food to us, then we can't or won't eat it.

Smell also helps our digestive system prepare for food by producing digestive juices, saliva, and enzymes to digest the food we are smelling. And so the wonderful aroma of food cooking is also helping our appetities and our digestion.

Our brains use smell to help us remember things. Even a very tiny amount of an aroma can bring back a flood of memories for us. Smell works similar to music that way for our brains. Even now, the smell of cedar reminds me of childhood visits to a long-dead Grandmother's home, which was made from cedar. I used to spend hours happily in her attic looking through all her ancient treasures under the cedar beams. I can remember way more details of a visit to her home if I catch a whiff of cedar than if I just sit and try to recall them.

Realtors know this, and suggest that people bake cookies or bread just before having to show a house, so it seems homier and people can imagine living there.

The sense of smell connects in our brains' emotional centers. A smell can evoke an emotion. Which is why we use perfumes and deodorants to modify our smells. And food manufacturers add things just for the smell, like vanilla, even though it doesn't change the actual taste that much. Smells affect our emotions considerably. And pheremones (hormones that have a scent) are how we connect and bond physically and emotionally with each other. Think of how your newborn baby smelled...or the smell of a new puppy. With smell being so important and so influential in how we think and feel, it is understandable that people with very different diets might have trouble living and cooking together.

I dated a guy in college who's roommate was from India. At that time, I was not used to that kind of cooking and I might never have even tried it. Their house "smelled funny" to me. I think it was cardamom or some spice that is in curry. It smelled awful to me at the time. But after I became a vegetarian and discovered that some of the best vegetarian food was Indian food, I ate curry a lot. Curry is an "aquired taste." And I think the reason is the smell. But once my body learned that the curry smell meant really good tasting food, the smell became one that makes me hungry now.

When I was a vegetarian, I compromised and went back to eating meat when I married. I didn't feel good for about a year until my system adjusted. However, even after I adjusted to eating meat again, I don't think it was the healthiest diet for me, since I usually do better with less meat. But I felt it was more important to mesh lifestyles with the person I was married to than to stick rigidly to a certain lifestyle that was done by choice, not necessity. Some people can't eat meat because there just isn't any meat to eat. That's not the same. I had a choice, and meat was part of our diet. I think, looking back, that part of my hesitancy at first was simply that I had not really learned how to cook meat until then, other than warming up hot dogs. I had eaten out most of the time before that.

Even though the sense of smell is so connected to our appetites (both with food and with people) some people are even more sensitive to it than others. Sensory issues can be dealt with using a type of OT called Sensory Integration, which helps my son, who is extremely sensitive to scent. (One of the things we work on is his tendency to have to smell everything which is socially unacceptable. He can smell if I mix a tiny amount of milk into some mashed potatoes.) There is another thread here about vegetarians who smoke. Maybe vegetarians who smoke won't have as much of an issue with the smell of meat cooking?
 Ideoform
Joined: 9/23/2007
Msg: 49
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Vegetarians - how do you feel about your SO cooking meat?
Posted: 9/7/2010 8:13:39 AM
Perhaps if vegetarians who are averse to the smell of meat were to eat small amounts of it from time to time, this would change their sensitivity to the smell of meat cooking, because their bodies would then recognize the smell as food.
 .dej
Joined: 11/6/2007
Msg: 50
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Vegetarians - how do you feel about your SO cooking meat?
Posted: 9/7/2010 12:45:31 PM
Shortcut: I wouldn't date a vegetarian.

Not only because of the compatibility issue, but I also just don't want to date someone who seems like something is wrong with their brain.
 soflnighteagle
Joined: 8/12/2009
Msg: 52
Vegetarians - how do you feel about your SO cooking meat?
Posted: 9/7/2010 4:52:24 PM
People are vegetarians for different reasons. I choose to be a vegetarian because I just don't much care for the taste of meat. I have no problem with others eating, but I have noticed that most people add a lot of seasonings on their meat, so I'm wondering if that's because they don't really like the taste of the meat either but have just learned to cover it up.
 DartmouthRunner
Joined: 3/5/2009
Msg: 53
Vegetarians - how do you feel about your SO cooking meat?
Posted: 9/7/2010 6:02:25 PM

I have noticed that most people add a lot of seasonings on their meat, so I'm wondering if that's because they don't really like the taste of the meat either but have just learned to cover it up.


I have noticed many vegetarians add seasonings and sauces to their meals as well. Does that meant they are covering up the taste? No, like anything people like a variety of flavors in their meals. I'll cook my steak with no seasoning/sauce sometimes and other times I'll add some steak spice...just depends on what I'm in the mood for.
 soflnighteagle
Joined: 8/12/2009
Msg: 55
Vegetarians - how do you feel about your SO cooking meat?
Posted: 9/8/2010 1:10:10 PM
I don't eat tofu, and yea I have to agree that if you are eating something that looks and tastes like meat, then just eat the meat. Also smoother something in ketchup, or barbecue sauce and tell me it brings out the flavor of the meat. Can anyone tell me what the meat tastes like at McDonald's?
 damassteel
Joined: 7/22/2009
Msg: 56
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Vegetarians - how do you feel about your SO cooking meat?
Posted: 9/8/2010 1:11:50 PM
I'm not in any way doctrinaire about not eating meat. You know, no moral disagreements with those who choose to eat it.
I don't eat it often myself. But, I have gone through an inventory of all of my serious relationships and I've discovered that ALL were vegetarians or close to it. What I can recall is this; I did not at all care for the smell of women (or Men for that matter)who ate a lot of meat. In fact I'm repulsed by it. All along without really thinking about it, I've been selecting for vegetarians, or very low meat consumers.
So for me, the relationship doesn't have much of a chance, none in fact, if she's a frequent meat-eater.
 moraima
Joined: 6/26/2005
Msg: 58
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Vegetarians - how do you feel about your SO cooking meat?
Posted: 9/9/2010 2:30:19 PM
"I see anything with blood or skin raw and it un nerves me.."

Vegetarians better not be surgeons/surgical staff.

When I first saw an operation, where the surgeon made a large incision, I was fascinated by the yellow layer of fat, never mind the blood and guts.

A vegetarian friend (who has thought the whole thing through, and educated herself on the subject .....nurse too) accompained me to a first world country. She was quite happy to eat the meat gifted to us. She commented after two weeks that she had no physcial problems from the diet change. Then again, she is capable of going with the flow of life.

No one is going to change anyone's mind OP, unless they are so in need of a relationship that they will do anything to have one.

The ones I feel sorry for are the vegetarians that know their dogs need meat, know the benefits of a raw diet for dogs, and perserve to give their dog what the dog needs. God help the dog who's owner tries to force it on to a vegetarian diet. God help the s/o who is forced to give up meal.

Each to their own.
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