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Show ALL Forums  > Science/philosophy  > Introspection      Home login  
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 IgorFrankensteen
Joined: 6/29/2009
Msg: 2
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IntrospectionPage 1 of 1    
It depends on lots of factors.

Some people get NOTHING from introspection, because they have no idea how to reason logically, are still caught up in the young-child notion that outside authorities always know best, or any number of problems.

Some people can get TREMENDOUS progress from it, because they have good reasoning skills, are in touch with and recognize their own thoughts and emotions clearly, and can therefore noodle things through on their own pretty well.

And everything in between.

Worst candidates for introspection: people who are energized about figuring out how to blame other people and ideas for all of their problems. They will tend to reinforce their own prejudices with introspection, and accomplish LESS than nothing by it.
 AddHomonym
Joined: 12/26/2011
Msg: 5
Introspection
Posted: 12/30/2011 12:41:00 AM
My take on it would be that like so many other things in life, you get out what you are willing to put into it.

I wouldn't really know but if you can find an old hermit living in a cave somewhere, they might be able to offer something more valuable.

Another problem might be with what we choose to consider as having "value". Introspection is a character trait despised by the military, for example but something that a sadhu could never do without. Both the soldier and the sadhu can be "successful" despite being apparent opposites.

What I'm saying is that I think you already know the answer to your question.
 pappy009
Joined: 2/3/2008
Msg: 7
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Introspection
Posted: 12/30/2011 9:08:43 AM
I agree with Miss Meow....I do not make any decisions at all without viewing, at best the whole picture...Introspection is my middle name....I think about every thing and research whatever I have to deal with...especially legal and governmental...you'd be surprised when you discover what government is all about...its not what we think.
 AddHomonym
Joined: 12/26/2011
Msg: 11
Introspection
Posted: 1/15/2012 10:53:06 AM

But you see... you cannot eliminate a piece... it has to fit in someplace.. it's those pieces that don't fit that drive us to insanity..perhaps literally.


Aw rats! I thought mine came with "extras":(
 Kings_Knight
Joined: 1/20/2009
Msg: 14
Introspection
Posted: 2/5/2012 10:25:13 AM

" ... How much can we learn from introspection and how does that affect our decision making? To what extent can that be proved? ... "


Perhaps the better question to be asked is: How many nits do you wish to pick, and for how long? There is such a thing as 'too much information'. When that point is reached, making a rational decision becomes impossible because the information overload paralyses the will to act.

A second question is: For how long do you wish to pick nits? People who dwell overmuch on 'finding just the right answer' make themselves (and everyone around them) crazy because they never effing quit 'analysing'.

As for 'proving' these claims: Just spend a day with one of these 'introspective' / 'analytical' ones and you'll have your answer. You'll be so happy to return to the peace and quiet of your own mind you'll never ask this question again. Those ones never. effing. shut. up.
 IgorFrankensteen
Joined: 6/29/2009
Msg: 15
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Introspection
Posted: 2/5/2012 12:16:19 PM
Actually, I have found myself, that "picking nits" is sometimes where the real gems of insight are discovered.

In the rest of the world of actual events, I see this reflected fairly often. Stories that support this include such as the discovery of spies, by those who question and investigate small anomalies in others behavior; the discovery of new cures of diseases, by those who get caught up searching the tiniest details of what is otherwise mostly meaningless dreck (one recent such 'dreck' discovery, was of a fungus that eats certain plastics, which were once thought to be impossible to economically remove from our ecology); many brilliant psychological, philosophical, and even analytic insights have come from the nitpickers of the world.

Thus, as is so often true, whether someone is over-focused on unimportant details, or is involved in a valuable, in depth investigation, is determined not by the pursuit, but by it's outcome.

The world is full of a mix of people designated to be introverted fools, for having arrived at the point of observation empty-handed; and others who are said to be brilliant philosophers, because they have conclusions that they can offer up when interviewed.
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