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 IgorFrankensteen
Joined: 6/29/2009
Msg: 2
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Aaron HernandezPage 1 of 4    (1, 2, 3, 4)
Well, OJ escaped because the LA police and the prosecution people there were incompetent idiots. If the prosecution of Hernandez is similarly conducted, then whether he did these horrible things or not, he will also escape.

It is waaaay too soon to have any way to draw any valid conclusions.
 IgorFrankensteen
Joined: 6/29/2009
Msg: 4
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Aaron Hernandez
Posted: 6/29/2013 3:35:11 PM
I don't entirely disagree, Madailein. Jury selection for OJ was among the things grossly and incompetently mishandled by the prosecution, hence they got the sort of jury you believe they were.

I'm not convinced that they would have set OJ free no matter what, by any means, though. I watched the trial as closely as I could from back east, and, possibly because of my historian training, I took note of what the jury was, and was not allowed to hear, but which the rest of the public WAS allowed to hear and see. Thus when the verdict came down, I was not that surprised by it. At least half of what was shown here on TV, was not permitted to reach those jurists.

Further, the prosecution were incompetent in how they presented evidence, in how they instructed the jury to understand it, and on and on. Anyway, we probably don't want to rehash OJ here. Not really pertinent to the thread.

As far as keeping anyone with previous gang affiliations out of the NFL, I don't think that will happen. Not just because the teams have all shown that they will ignore as much as they possibly can about someone, if they think it will help them win, and to make more money ( I thought that Albert Haynesworth proved he was a walking piece of garbage, long before my home team gave him wealth beyond the dreams of avarice, and the Patriots decided to add to his pile). It's also true that they DON'T want to hold people back, just because they screwed up in the past.
 IgorFrankensteen
Joined: 6/29/2009
Msg: 6
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Aaron Hernandez
Posted: 7/2/2013 2:40:26 PM
Interesting. I have myself been hearing tons of speculative and outraged commentators on the "news" shows, talking up a storm about Hernandez' gang affiliations.

But now that I search on "Hernandez" plus "gang," all I see are denials by Hernandez of any gang affiliation, and repeated statements that though all sorts of authorities are worried that he IS gang connected, so far, none of them have found any evidence to support that.
 MGMLION
Joined: 4/29/2008
Msg: 7
Aaron Hernandez
Posted: 7/2/2013 3:05:30 PM

Say Madailein, do you have information of this or are you just jumping to a conclusion?


He has tatoos down both arms that are affiliated with gangs. He's being investigated in a double murder that happened last july, shot someone's eye out in february and now the death of Oldin. He will never play NFL football again.
 MGMLION
Joined: 4/29/2008
Msg: 9
Aaron Hernandez
Posted: 7/3/2013 10:13:54 AM

If he is found "not guilty" of the murder charges, the Cincinnati Bengals will have a contract waiting for him. Then he can hang out with Pac-Mac and the other criminals on that team.


There is way too much evidence against him on his charges that is why the judge denied him bail. No way he will be found not guilty.
 IgorFrankensteen
Joined: 6/29/2009
Msg: 11
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Aaron Hernandez
Posted: 7/4/2013 4:33:31 AM

He has tattoos down both arms that are affiliated with gangs.


Actually, when I looked Googled "Hernandez" and "gang," again, what I found was story after story where onlookers said that they thought or feared that some of those tattoos were indications of gang membership, but every story I have seen SO FAR went on to say that the authorities themselves (i.e. the ones running the prison he is being held at) could not find any gang tats.

As far as his guilt or innocence, I will wait for the trial as always. What has been said to be true so far, convinces me that they were right to incarcerate him until trial. But just to be sure we do things right, I myself have had to pull back from believing for sure that this was a gang-related mess, until such time as that IS shown to be true.

And, of course, it doesn't require an existing well-known gang, for someone to behave in the same manner that gangs and gang members do. Therefore, whether Hernandez is gang affiliated or not, whatever he did is still entirely his personal responsibility and his choice.
 Walts
Joined: 5/7/2005
Msg: 12
Aaron Hernandez
Posted: 7/5/2013 5:08:25 AM
When you draft kids into any sport,especially it seems football and basketball, the kids have yet to figure out what true reality is. Some of the enviroments of which some of these kids have grown up in have not been the most positive and the majority of the population would never survive to the age of 18. Think for a moment why a quarterback, with a rising star quality in the NFL would be connected with dog fighting. You would think he would have "known better" but,again, if you never grew up as he did you really wouldn't have a clue how and what he was thinking.
 Walts
Joined: 5/7/2005
Msg: 14
Aaron Hernandez
Posted: 7/5/2013 4:21:22 PM
I'm not condoning the actions of them, but, I do understand the mentality that some of them have. In fact, your country and it's own "laws" breed some of this shiat. Think about the "neighbourhood watch" guy that felt a gun would solve a "problem" that he thought he was facing. Just another shiat storm that I am sure you have better knowledge of than I.
 cooldog65
Joined: 6/27/2011
Msg: 15
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Aaron Hernandez
Posted: 7/5/2013 4:47:23 PM
You can take a thug out of the hood, but you can't always take the hood out of the thug. Money can't buy character and morals. Most of them are grossly overpaid without the right mindset to handle it properly.
 Walts
Joined: 5/7/2005
Msg: 16
Aaron Hernandez
Posted: 7/5/2013 4:54:09 PM
^^^^ Cooldog said it much better than I. One of the ex NFL coaches was commenting on the all the work some teams do to try and "break" these guys "in". Which includes most things some of us are taught before we are 12. Common courtesy,problem solving, social interaction, and the ability to handle "confrontation" with words, instead of, well, guns.
 IgorFrankensteen
Joined: 6/29/2009
Msg: 18
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Aaron Hernandez
Posted: 7/8/2013 7:12:59 PM

Obviously you have not looked hard enough;
Yet, on the internet, his “blood” gang tattoo on his hand is demonstrated, for starters:


Not to be taking sides with this guy again, but just to be taking sides with the principle of sticking with FACTUALITY...

it is actually you who aren't looking hard enough there.

That tattoo doesn't say "Blood." It says "Blood, Sweat and Tears."

As for the photo of him performing "gang signs," I can't myself call that good evidence, especially since he is grinning as he does so.

Unfortunately, it has become a form of fashionable 'cleverness' for people to ape gang signs like that. Comedians do them, they show up in commercials, all over the place.

Now, maybe he was purposely doing a particular gang sign, for serious reasons there, maybe not. He says not. It is my own impression (note I claim no authority here) that serious gang members do NOT wear silly hats and silly facial expressions while demonstrating their gang loyalty through the use of such signs.

Again, for the sake of taking the definition of FACTS, seriously, I can't say that this link is valid proof that Hernandez is, or ever has been a member of the Bloods, or of any other gang.
 MGMLION
Joined: 4/29/2008
Msg: 19
Aaron Hernandez
Posted: 7/8/2013 10:19:12 PM

That tattoo doesn't say "Blood." It says "Blood, Sweat and Tears."


Not much difference in saying Blood, Lies & Alibis which is some gangs motto.
 IgorFrankensteen
Joined: 6/29/2009
Msg: 20
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Aaron Hernandez
Posted: 7/9/2013 3:50:23 AM
Okay, but is "Blood Sweat and Tears" also a known gang logo? If yes, then you have some real evidence. If not, then you don't. And I differ very strongly with you, as would real gang members, that "it's not much different." It either is, or is not a gang logo or saying. Being "like" a gang saying, means that it isn't one.

I especially suggest you look at the video mini interview that is a part of the link Madailein provided, which took place before this mess started. Note first, that it is also before the blood sweat and tears tat was added, then listen to how he explains what other tats mean to him. In the context of his large saying made up of two letter words, "blood sweat and tears" would fit right in as another personal inspirational thing to put on his skin.

Again, it doesn't mean that he DIDN'T use "B,S, &T" as a way to put a gang tat and hide it in plain sight, nor is it proof that he has no gang affiliations. All I'm saying is, that it does not rise to the level of proof required for anyone to claim that he DOES have obvious gang tats.
 IgorFrankensteen
Joined: 6/29/2009
Msg: 23
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Aaron Hernandez
Posted: 7/9/2013 8:04:16 PM

I say it does…


Ah! In that case, obviously it does. I had quite forgotten that "Yeah, but no" is a well established immutable golden element of the American Legal Heritage, as well as all accepted philosophies of formal debate.
 Yule_liquor
Joined: 12/7/2011
Msg: 25
Aaron Hernandez
Posted: 7/14/2013 8:17:13 AM
Hernandez, given his gang affiliations, should never have been drafted by the Patriots
or any NFL team.


This is kinda funny, because if you use this criteria then about 1/2 to 2/3 of all NFL players wouldn't be drafted. As far as the NFL is concerned; their moral fiber is as thick as a cheap piece of toilet paper. Teams would draft pple like Charles Manson & the Zodiac killer if they thought these pple could help them draw fans and win some games. The NFL is a violent sport; and what better place to draft players from then violent environments? Morality has had little place in the NFL, as it has become a huge money making machine by selling 'organized' violence to a sub-culture that gets off it vicariously!

Whether or not AH has gang ties is not the issue. The issue is that he is a (violent) socio-path. The difference between him and many of his fellow players (of the same stripe) in the NFL is that he (allegedly)acted out on his passions. He is by no means unique!
 Yule_liquor
Joined: 12/7/2011
Msg: 26
Aaron Hernandez
Posted: 7/14/2013 8:27:20 PM

You act as if Hernadez is the rule rather than the exception.


There is a fine line between what AH "did" and what many other NFL players could be particularly "prone' to doing!
We don't have the full array of information to say for sure whether AH is the "rule" or just an anomaly.
But I think that there has been a reasonable degree of evidence to show how violent & volatile many NFL players are. The infractions committed vary on a broad scale from: misdemeanor violations, to wife/GF abuse; larceny; fire-arms possessions; assault( sexual & otherwise); substance usage, etc. This is not just my opinion.

Murder itself is (by far) not the litmus test that determine how violent (or unviolent) most NFL players are. Most don't act on impulse like AH did. Not all socio-paths are murders. Not all who committed criminal acts have "gang" ties; and not all who have "gang" ties committed crimes (that we, the public know of)

You might say that this type of thing is just a cross-section of what happens in ordinary life;if you wanna sugar coat it a bit. But the fact is that it happens with a recurrent frequency in the NFL; which I believe is due to the socially turbulent & violent background that most of these individuals emanate from.

The NFL has cared little about the demeanor of these individuals except when something is done by them to possibly harm the "NFL brand" in some way; then at times you'll hear official statements being made by the NFL high command in repudiation.


Lumping th entire NFL with this guy is unfair to all the players who do good work for charities.


"do good work for charities"????

I'll admit that there are a few players who Genuinely do charitable duties ( Tebow, Brees, the Mannings, to name some that come to mind); but the majority of them do it on the advice of their accountants & PR crews. Keep in mind that sponsoring a kiddie team or making a sizeable donation to a children's hospital is not a big expense for someone who makes millions per year!


Add up all the players who have ever played in the league and then add up how many have been brought up on murder charges.


See 1st response above, 2nd paragraph


You'll begin to see that Hernandez isn't indicative of the NFL culture.


AH's acts (if convicted) are indeed consistent with the NFL's culture of violence; what makes him stand out is that he falls on the extreme side of a typical "bell shaped" curve; leaving the illusion that he is unique amongst others.

This is not about "lumping" all NFL players with AH; its about understanding what kind of individuals are drawn into playing this sport in modern times, and what many such players are prone to doing. What makes one player cross that figurative line isn't always readily visible on the surface.

There are those (perhaps even yourself) who wanna excise AH as just an anomaly in this sport, which I think is a form of cognitive bias. I believe that there is a closer connection between what he's done and those who may be on the cusp of doing (but never will carry it out) the same type of deed because of the violent background that they come from. That same background or culture that makes them effective as players in the NFL.
 IgorFrankensteen
Joined: 6/29/2009
Msg: 28
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Aaron Hernandez
Posted: 7/15/2013 4:12:23 AM
I agree with Madailein and others, who are basically pointing out that the News Media people are playing this drama up in their usual, profit-oriented, damn-the-facts-let's-pretend-it's-a-well-known-scandal fashion.

The fact that we DO find this man's apparent actions to be so shocking that we are paying this much attention to it, should be proof all by itself that we expect the opposite.
 Yule_liquor
Joined: 12/7/2011
Msg: 29
Aaron Hernandez
Posted: 7/16/2013 6:55:12 PM
At skooch


You say "most" of the players are violent when you are only dealing with only one example.


Lets not be totally ridiculous, now!
There have been ample examples of violent acts committed by various NFL players year in and year out; I gave you a run down of such acts on a previous post!


Then you say "few" players do things for charity. You were able to rattle off three names for charity and only one guy for having violent tendencies.


Go back read what I wrote and try to pay attention this time.
What I said is that of the many who partake in charitable acts; there are but a few who do so for genuine reasons other than secondary gain. There may be a bit more than the 3 individuals that I named, but that should have been enough to make my point.

Lastly and most importantly, being involved in some kinda charity is NOT itself a 'sine qua non' that somehow is sufficient to absolve someone of having a malevolent nature/disposition.


You really should try to understand the difference between violence on a football field violence on the streets.


Oh, should I really?
Then maybe I should bring up Bounty-gate (or scandal). If this isn't a clear example or ORGANIZED pre-meditated egregious violence against a FELLOW athlete on another team for the PURPOSE of maiming or seriously hurting him (in order to collect some kinda reward) then nothing is!!!

This illustrates involvement & dedication to acts of violence with impunity from the coaching staff down to the players, as well as tacit approval by top level organization/owners. (please don't say that the owner didn't or do not know what goes on!).

WTF would you think the kinda CHARACTER of a typical player(s) who'd volunteer himself for this kind of despicable action is like? Would you think he is a "good guy" (especially if he's involved in doing charity, or would you think he is a low-life!) Would someone like Tim Tebow have volunteered (or be coerced) to doing this kinda thing?

So if this shit would be happening "on the streets" the parties involved would NO DOUBT be charged with assault with intent to injure; if the victim was injured then the charge is battery, and depending on the severity of the injury, the perpetrators could be slapped with a civil suit as well as facing criminal charges. If the result is death, it could easily be 2nd degree murder (if not 1st).

But according to your train of thought, if it happens on a "football field" it is somehow okay, and part of the game; As long as we stop short of murder! But I guess you'd say that could never happen in the context of a football game could it! Bounty or no bounty!

And by the way, please don't think that Bounty-ism is something that was limited to the policy of 1 team only (the Saints); it has been part of the NFL culture for quite sometime, as many have admitted.


You can believe that the NFL is comprised of a bunch of thugs if you want. You're wrong!!!


The NFL doesn't draft from Divinity schools!
They draft the strongest, fastest, hard-nosed, heaviest & meanest players who are the top in their respective positions, from schools that have high level football programs and (who scout & target the best highschool prospects in order to bring attention and $$$ to their schools); like it or not, a violent background only serves to enhance the qualifications of a given player. Most of these kids are from the back woods or inner cities, where they give all they can to get a "ticket" outta misery. In many cases, Violence has tempered them to reach the measure of success that they could not otherwise get if they grew up in a quiet calm well-to-do town or neighborhood! Once in the NFL, not everyone of these players are able to dissociate that part of their lives and elevate themselves into a different realm. As long as they make the team & league money, everything is cool!


You just have to watch a game every once in a while and you'll see how much the NFL does for The United Way and their Play 60, or whatever the program is called, where players spend their time to go advvocate children to get away from the video games and go play.


Well, gee I guess that makes everything okay! Lets give Rog Goodell his kudos for doing his best for bringing out the "warm fuzzy" feelings from pple like yourself, its just enough to smooth over what unsightly wrinkles are left on the field of dreams that you don't need to look at!


You also should try not to categorize all crimes committed in the NFL as the same.


Oooooh goodness gracious! I'll try NOT to categorize all crimes committed in the NFL as the same as those committed "on the streets". And I'll try to remember that what despicable actions take place on the field will always stay on the field! How's that?


We're talking murder here


No, we are talking violence, of which murder happens to be a sub-category.


you're bringing up drug use and firearm possession and throwing them all in the same pot.


If the "pot" you are referring to is the "pot of criminality" , then that is the broad category where they all belong! Unless of course you just happen to believe that Murder is the only action deemed worthy of being labeled as a crime!


I found online a guy who did his homework


Wow!
What a rock-solid source of info that must be, eh!


he says that there 2900 players in the NFL and 40 of them were arrested in 2012. That means a mere 1.3% got arrested last year. The national average for males 23-34 is 10.8%. It's disingenuous to claim that the NFL has a criminal culture when the facts say that's not true.


So, even this stat were true; you are using it to make a judgment that because the arrest percentage in the NFL happens to be lower than in the gen'l population, it would serve to show that the NFL is does NOT have a criminal culture?

Am I reading you correctly?
Man you can't be that gullible; or can you!

Let me spell it out as simple as possible for ya!
If a dude from the hood is all of a sudden getting paid gazillions of dollars a year; DON"T YOU THINK, that he is far less likely to:
1) stick up a convenience store
2) mug somebody on the street
3) break into some car/house
4)shop-lift
5) sell dope
6) buy dope on the street

Most of the above are semi-petty or petty crimes that are most commonly perpetrated in the inner city; which on average usually yields anywhere from a few bucks to several hundred dollars. Thus, I'm SURE you can now see that this isn't something that some newly multi-millionaire wearing an Armani suit & driving an S-class Mercedes , is gonna be doing anymore!!!!
================================================

At Madalein


One of my family members is in the Pro Football Hall of Fame and he is a great family man. Tough guys are usually not evil; no need to prove their machismo outside the football field.


You are mixing apples with oranges!
What you've employed is biased thinking; a logical fallacy referred to as "confirmation bias"; which is the tendancy to look for confirming 'evidence' to support your beliefs rather than to look for disconfirming evidence to refute it. Example you gave ^ about a family member is a good one.

Btw, acts of violence by these players are not done for the purpose of "proving" machismo. Many who do this are socio-paths, whose actions are not ego driven!


Yes, some of them get arrested — about 2 to 3 percent a year. The national arrest rate for males aged 22 to 34? It’s 10.8 percent, according to FBI crime statistics for 2009.


You can refer to my last response I gave to "skoochie" whose post I was address up above when he alluded to a similar set of stats. The same answer applies!
 Yule_liquor
Joined: 12/7/2011
Msg: 30
Aaron Hernandez
Posted: 7/16/2013 10:59:14 PM

they commit crimes at a significantly lower rate


and I logically explained to why this is!
Nobody making millions is gonna rob someone for peanuts; but the fact that there are STILL a few that do commit these crimes speaks strongly for my position.


You were wrong to act like there is a culture of criminal behavior in the NFL


Criminal behavior permeates the NFL like cheap perfume on a street ho
Only those who are criminally inclined would enter into a "bounty" program, as I pointed out
Otherwise no man with any sense of decency would partake in it or approve of it, let alone keep quiet about it.
Goodell was forced to act on it, because the public at large (but not hard wired fans) found it appalling and distasteful.
But he no doubt had to know of it being practiced beforehand.

You obviously took little effort to understand or to offer anything cohesive to much of what I wrote, very likely because you seem so deeply indoctrinated in your allegiance to the (false) integrity projected by this sporting organization that has you in complete denial.

There is therefore little value in furthering this discussion.
 IgorFrankensteen
Joined: 6/29/2009
Msg: 31
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Aaron Hernandez
Posted: 7/21/2013 8:59:45 AM

Criminal behavior permeates the NFL like cheap perfume on a street ho


Whenever someone says something like that, my first response is to ask...

Exactly how is it you know this? The obvious answers lead to a reduction in how seriously I take the associated assertions.


Only those who are criminally inclined would enter into a "bounty" program, as I pointed out
Otherwise no man with any sense of decency would partake in it or approve of it, let alone keep quiet about it.
Goodell was forced to act on it, because the public at large (but not hard wired fans) found it appalling and distasteful.
But he no doubt had to know of it being practiced beforehand.


This is unrelated to the Hernandez situation. My response pointing out where your thinking is erroneous about it would be more off the point of the thread, so I wont put it here, except to say that in order to relate Hernandez to that mess, requires such wide and vague generalizations, that you might as well declare that the culture of competitiveness, which is an integral part of most animal activities, is something to be discarded as tending to make everyone and everything into criminals.


There is therefore little value in furthering this discussion.


Certainly no point, if you insist on straying so far from the reason for the thread.
 Yule_liquor
Joined: 12/7/2011
Msg: 32
Aaron Hernandez
Posted: 7/21/2013 9:22:44 PM

Exactly how is it you know this?


The phrase is a figure of speech, to describe what is reeking subliminally from that sub-culture.


This is unrelated to the Hernandez situation.


No kidding!
I admit that it was a bit off point, but if you took the time to see how it led me to bring this up (in response to the above poster's assertion that there is "no culture of violence" in the NFL), you probably wouldn't be making this statement.

The question is whether or not AH is an anomaly (in behavior) or if he just a "bird of a feather" that took it just "one
step further".


that you might as well declare that the culture of competitiveness, which is an integral part of most animal activities, is something to be discarded as tending to make everyone and everything into criminals.


Boy, talk about putting "words" in pple's mouths, eh!
It may surprise you to know that a "culture of competitiveness" actually differs from a"culture of violence"; which in this case the latter may have contaminated the former to make them both nearly indistinguishable (at least, in the minds of devoted NFL fans) . As far as (human) animal activities are concerned, we do have concepts such as "sportsmanship, professional conduct & fair play", and respective rules(for those who choose to enact them) in order to enforce them.
 IgorFrankensteen
Joined: 6/29/2009
Msg: 33
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History
Aaron Hernandez
Posted: 7/22/2013 4:17:17 AM
I withdraw my objection to your colorful metaphore, and admit that I was brought to my comments by irritation at the idea that somehow, Hernandez's actions could be blamed on the NFL establishing a "culture of violence." It is that notion specifically that I continue to protest is nonsense.

If anything, I am saying that there may be many examples found, where a POSITIVE concept or motivating ideal, gets exaggerated by some otherwise defective individuals, and a very NEGATIVE set of behaviors results.

I contend that it is absurd to go all the way back, and claim that the original concept or ideal is to blame, and to be discarded, because a small number of miscreants misuse it. If we did so to any significant degree, humanity would be reduced to sitting in individual rooms, staring at posters warning them not to think or act in any way at all.

You may as well blame the concept of "love thy neighbor" for the fact that some jerks chase each others spouses for sex.
 AllAboutSports
Joined: 8/10/2010
Msg: 34
Aaron Hernandez
Posted: 7/22/2013 11:47:29 PM
Wow...I read the post and I got to say some common sense is missing here......People are arguing the legitimacy of the nfl players and ow a few bad apples shouldn't be lumped into a whole basket...and one guy said some thugs are good people.....really?I also heard people say that football is a violent sport so aggression can be warranted to some people more so than others....but mma fighting is violent,so is boxing,and you don't nearly have the criminal element that the nfl or the nba even have in it.

The problem isn't because they grew up poor,the problem is they were good athletes and were entitled.they were pampered and hero worshiped.to say a thug can change can look at pac man jones,dontae stallworth,and the worst of the bunch and in my opinion the absolute most vile human on the planet,mike vick who tortured innocent dogs.he had millions,just signing that 100 mill contract for the falcons.so to say they don't commit crimes when they are rich are bs.I read o ne guy say they don't break into houses or cars,and its a petty crime....petty to who?I personally know someone who had their home broken into their dogs pepper sprayed and their belongings taken.it was an emptional rape to them because they didn't feel secure in their house.to say it is petty make me ill.if it was up to me I would have the 10 20 life law for burgaleries.qo years for breaking in,20 years for stealing anything 20 dollars or more,life for anything over 1000 dollars with no chance of parole.
to say its ok to have thugs in the nfl is flat wrong.children and teens hero worship these stars....yes they worship kobe who is an alleged rapist and general douche, mike vick who got off strangling dogs,and burris,a wide receiver who was dumb enough to shoot himself in the leg taking a gun to a club.I think goodell is doing a great job suspending these cancers,and I hope a rule is in place to avoid these character issue people from joining the nfl soon.
and as far as the stats go that the lady was referring, she said something like national average is 10 percent and and the nfl is 7 percent I think....the problem is that the number of the national average is wayyyy more people than in the nfl,so 7 percent is bad.real bad considering 32 rosters of 53.

someone also said that when they get big money they turn good or something to that effect.and they don't.i have a friend who dated an nfl player,just a few years ago....I have been in the locker room.the nfl wants its image good,so they hide alot.alot of players beat their wives,cheat on them and have a zillion kids and still don't pay child support ot see them,some cant read,others have a posse of thugs.My main point is money doesn't make u turn good,it only inhances the personality that you already have.they have to go,anything else would be a travisty
 IgorFrankensteen
Joined: 6/29/2009
Msg: 35
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History
Aaron Hernandez
Posted: 7/23/2013 4:36:08 AM

.the nfl wants its image good,so they hide alot.


No doubt true, just as it is for every other public organization. Big corporations do the same thing. Hiding the dirty laundry is "public relations 101."

Not defending it, just pointing out that the NFL is nether worse nor better than any other popularity-based enterprise in this.

Oh, and as a basic fan of one of the teams suffering a multi-year punishment, just for making the mistake of hiring a coach (Greg Williams) who is now the poster-child for putting bounties on opposing players, I have a hard time accepting that the NFL "turns a blind eye" to all manner of bad behavior.

They certainly did in the past, but then when I was growing up, EVERYONE hid bad behavior. A lot of the reason why so many people today think that the country is going to hell in a hand-basket, is because the news used to help hide pretty much every scandal that famous people were guilty of, especially spouse abuse, and petty crimes.

As I said before, I am opposed to blaming the NFL for Hernandez's actions. This is for two reasons. One, I really have seen no proof that the NFL actively did anything to help him be however bad a person he is, which was not also consistent with trying to provide a supportive place for him to move away from such behaviors. And two, I want there to be absolutely no doubt whatsoever, that Hernandez should be held 100% responsible for every damn thing he did.
 AllAboutSports
Joined: 8/10/2010
Msg: 36
Aaron Hernandez
Posted: 7/23/2013 5:14:01 AM
^^^^
I agree whole heartedly.He chose his actions,not the nfl.I went on a tangent because I read so many younger people who glorified these thugs and say we should give them a chance.and it really rubbed me the wrong way when one poster said petty crimes were just petty.I would hate to see how petty they think it is if they come home and their house is trashed and they feel victimized.or they work hard and get a new car and its stolen. I also feel like the nfl knows more about this case with hernandez than anyone,because I know they employ high level retired law enforcement and fbi to do security,hence the buy back of his jersey.we shall see what happens.but I think they definatly now know things that will come to light later on.
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