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 naysaying_knicktwist
Joined: 11/19/2009
Msg: 2
ChestnutsPage 1 of 1    
Ha - how fun that you tried making them. I'm surprised they were nasty - I would have thought they'd be good - roasted peanuts are good, right? Of course, now that I think about it, does anyone ever put chestnuts in a recipe? I guess that's kind of what you're asking, huh?
 anita_lay
Joined: 12/19/2012
Msg: 3
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Chestnuts
Posted: 12/27/2013 4:47:06 PM
I remember the first time I smelled roast chestnuts. It was London, it was winter and boy was I disappointed. They smell so delicious but that soft mushy inside - yuck.
However, one year I did make chestnut puree and it's really delicious. Fiddly, but pretty special.
Here's how, Procol:
(Makes 1 cup)
200gm (around 7 ozs) fresh chestnuts, in shell
Water, as needed
2.5 cups milk
Half a vanilla bean
Quarter to a third cup of sugar (to taste)
3 tablespoons of cognac or brandy (optional)
Step 1 - Shell chestnuts by making an "X" incision only in the bottom round portion of each nut.
Step 2 - Place the chestnuts on a baking tray in a small amount of water and bake at 240c for 8 to 10 minutes. Let cool.
Step 3 - Slip intact nuts from shells, remove skins and discard.
Step 4- Place the chestnuts, 2 cups of the milk and vanilla bean in a saucepan and heat to simmering. Simmer until all liquid has evaporated and chestnuts are tender.
Step 6- Add last 1/2 cup of milk and sugar and heat to dissolve sugar but do not evaporate.
Step 7 - Blend mixture with brandy/cognac, rub through sieve, place in jar.
It's great served with a dob of heavy cream. Very French.
 raxarsr
Joined: 7/10/2008
Msg: 4
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Chestnuts
Posted: 12/27/2013 9:45:57 PM
i've had chestnut dressing that was great.......never roasted them......but i've boiled them in saltwater.......not bad......they would proubly be pretty dang good spiced up.......bit of tang...bit of heat.........salt
 daynadaze
Joined: 2/11/2008
Msg: 5
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Chestnuts
Posted: 12/30/2013 8:02:50 PM
Several years ago at the Christmas festival in the town I was living in, a group was selling roasted ones in bags, like popcorn bags. My kids and I thought, wow, cool, let's get some. Oh gawd, nasty! I have to assume they were done correctly, as many people there loved them. These things were horrible!
 Dobermonster
Joined: 5/12/2010
Msg: 6
Chestnuts
Posted: 12/31/2013 8:31:32 AM
Really, they taste gross? That's so disappointing; years of Christmas carols had convinced me they were a seasonal delicacy . . . I'm sad now. :(
 raxarsr
Joined: 7/10/2008
Msg: 7
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Chestnuts
Posted: 12/31/2013 9:39:48 AM
gross?........no...but different....yes...they arent like any nut i can think of.........more like a potato.though thats not a good example.............i just cant think of anything else to compare them to
 013552
Joined: 3/14/2009
Msg: 8
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Chestnuts
Posted: 1/1/2014 2:15:09 PM
think its more a traditional fayre, as in in time of****ns they were symbolic of xmas, and cheap, nowadays as better quality of street food has become more readily available chestnuts have fallen by the proverbial wayside along with snow haha

in answer to dobermonsters comment of seasonal delicacy, think the squirrel nibbling on the chestnut most probably the real seasonal delicacy lol
 Tarnished_Knight
Joined: 3/5/2009
Msg: 9
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Chestnuts
Posted: 1/1/2014 10:02:27 PM
ph, my first question would be where did you get the "chestnuts?"
Did you harvest them yourself? Or did you buy them and, if so, were they certified as sweet chestnuts?

Short story explains my questions:
Son's mom and I, back in the dark ages of the late 70's or early 80's when we were dating, happened upon a chestnut tree on one of our hikes in the mountains (Appalachia) and also happened to have a couple of grocery bags with us in the car. So, we readily gathered all we could off the tree and the many that were upon the ground. That, of course, should have been the clue right there. Anyway, what we had were Horse Chestnuts, not Sweet edible Chestnuts. Fortunately, we found out before actually ate any. They are NASTY and toxic to some degree. Don't know right off how toxic, but it is sufficient that even animals don't eat the buggers - hence, the great number littered upon the ground.

If you have questions about the safety of the nuts in questions, and the taste aspect makes me suspicious, DO NOT consume anymore and toss what is left.

TK
[yeah, we were disappointed, but wiser for it]
 Tarnished_Knight
Joined: 3/5/2009
Msg: 11
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Chestnuts
Posted: 1/3/2014 9:49:44 PM
procolharem

One would think that a grocer would know the difference 'tween edible chestnuts and the inedible horse chestnut; but, it is easy to confuse the two post shelling. Do you know the provenance of the nuts in question? Did you go back and bring up the matter with your grocer?
There really shouldn't be a bad taste with the edible chestnut - although, I suppose, tastes can vary.

TK
 Irish Eyez
Joined: 12/30/2008
Msg: 14
Chestnuts
Posted: 1/4/2014 6:55:03 PM
I recall as a girl roasting chestnuts over an open fire ( fireplace ) in my granny's home. They were marvelous!
 HippyDippyWeatherman
Joined: 3/20/2008
Msg: 15
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Chestnuts
Posted: 1/4/2014 9:01:18 PM
Tasty and nasty, so close yet so far apart.
 Vannili
Joined: 7/8/2008
Msg: 16
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Chestnuts
Posted: 1/8/2014 2:55:45 AM
When was in Hong Kong ,I just put it in the oven the product was not eatable , a friend told me to boil it until the meat is tender then put it in the oven to roast it was good.. I bought some last month at Save Mart ,it was not so good,because
most of the inside meat is bitter and black..
 or_current_resident
Joined: 6/3/2013
Msg: 18
Chestnuts
Posted: 1/14/2014 4:25:08 PM

I bought some last month at Save Mart ,it was not so good,because
most of the inside meat is bitter and black..


Well u should have got your money back! As that is the sad fact in many places that sell them….

As the store bought ones…. are imo not good at all & past their prime where every they came from….^^^


And As for 'chestnuts" I only buy them from places that grows them locally on their land…as guarantee trust is the freshness here...
.
Locally…& fresh harvested chestnuts are wonderful fall winter treat……roasted or boiled….

Pierce & put on a low flame skillet for about 25 min…..let cool if you can wait... and its all good….
 NewYorker58
Joined: 6/11/2013
Msg: 19
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Chestnuts
Posted: 6/22/2018 10:40:39 AM
I love chestnuts, but like with any produce, you can by clunkers. A clunker in this case would be if they're not sweet. They're great roasted or boiled to eat as is or to use them in recipes, like stuffing. I get them at an Asian store around thanksgiving.
 Seamist474
Joined: 6/24/2018
Msg: 22
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Chestnuts
Posted: 7/3/2018 7:18:43 PM
Anita Lay

What a great name.
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