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 xlr8ingme
Joined: 11/2/2016
Msg: 1
Star TrekPage 1 of 1    
Has the science fiction of Star Trek inspired your educational pursuits, or your current career? Have any of the philosophical ideals presented inspired you to be a better/different person? When at the Star Trek 50th Anniversary Convention in NYC, I listened to a panel of scientists, and astronauts from NASA share their personal stories. I guess I never realized just how much of the science fiction was really science being used today. I know I truly enjoy the old reruns, and movies. I'm into the newer ones, because they seem to spark my creative energies. Reaching into the past for continuity into the future, for example. How have you been inspired by the science, or science fiction?
 gingerosity
Joined: 12/10/2011
Msg: 2
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Star Trek
Posted: 11/25/2016 1:25:15 AM
Saw some of the Next Generation episodes as a teen in the 90's. But being more in the British sphere of influence I had grown up with Blakes 7, so Star Trek always just seemed too damn utopian. A harmless flight of fantasy, then back to brutal reality.

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/a-very-british-space-crew-1138688.html
 Yule_liquor
Joined: 12/7/2011
Msg: 3
Star Trek
Posted: 11/25/2016 1:48:28 PM

Have any of the philosophical ideals presented inspired you to be a better/different person?


I dunno about being better or different, but with all the ass that Capt Kirk was getting (on and off the set), kinda gave a new meaning to the term "where no man has gone before".
Star Trek
Posted: 11/25/2016 7:52:17 PM
Blake's 7. I remember that. Used to watch it.

One thing that struck me at the age when I'd watch it is how the crew argued all the time over what to do, instead of a captain issuing orders etc. Somehow thought that was neat cause it was unconventional per my expectations of a t.v. show. I think the powers that were in Britain didn't much like the idea behind Blake's 7.

Miss Dr. Who too. Except that I don't like most of the incarnations. I'm a child of the Tom Baker era. Always thought his particular wit was funny. Matt Smith stories weren't bad either.

Could hardly stand TNG. Early seasons are absolutely atrocious in the writing, acting, and directing departments. And the ships are dog-shit ugly. That NG look...who the hell came up with that crap and why did they keep it for so long?
 gingerosity
Joined: 12/10/2011
Msg: 5
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Star Trek
Posted: 11/26/2016 8:00:00 AM

One thing that struck me at the age when I'd watch it is how the crew argued all the time over what to do, instead of a captain issuing orders etc. Somehow thought that was neat cause it was unconventional per my expectations of a t.v. show.

I had the opposite experience where argument, anarchy and irreverence was pretty normal on tv, and the heirarchy and order on the side of the protagonists in shows like Star Trek was weird when I eventually came across it. Same with the later Stargate, Battlestar Galactica and other projections of the US military industrial complex into the sci-fi genre. Even Star Wars suffered from it, although Lucas' earlier film THX1138 was more courageous in avoiding that. Come to think of it THX1138 could be considered something of a precursor to Blakes 7.

I think the powers that were in Britain didn't much like the idea behind Blake's 7.

You might have been surprised... anti-totalitarianism runs very deep in the British psyche, and not just since WW2. At the time they were watching the Dirty War with general sympathy for the desaparecidos, although it was before the Falklands of course.

I'm a child of the Tom Baker era. Always thought his particular wit was funny.

I watched Dr Who growing up too - wouldn't watch them again but would watch Blakes 7 again. Tom Baker and Sylvester McCoy are the Doctors that I remember the most.

That NG look...who the hell came up with that crap and why did they keep it for so long?

'Some smart producers' and 'because it made them lots of money' would be my best guesses.
Star Trek
Posted: 11/26/2016 11:54:55 AM
I wouldn't mind a new series starting...might already exist but I don't know, is an idea I'd use if I was in position to make one...wherein a bunch of people are exploring space on a reasonably sized ship, but they aren't operating under any government or similar entity and there isn't any other human presence in space as in a federation etc - some smart rich people figure out FTL tech and find a couple hundred other like minded folks (don't know how this part would be pulled off without being too gimmicky or "oh gimme a break"), and they build a ship in secret as a private personal endeavor (like maybe passing it off as a simulation for a planned amusement park), and then they take off. What you'll have is the mystery and adventure of exploration but the feel of them truly being on their own with not much backup/support mostly (and a perpetually uneasy/mixed relationship with Earth since no one officially sanctioned their endeavor), and not part of a bigger formal organization. And it'd be approximately present-day so the world in this show is a kind of starting-over in that there're no Romulans or Vulcans, etc, and everything really is unknown other than what we've gathered with our telescopes and probes.

NG ship styling is still ugly. They need to stop with that curve and sharp edge on the primary hull, and definitely need to stop using some arrowhead look...like they're trying to make them look "cool". They're already cool, and they're ruining the coolness that already existed. Federation ships had certain things which defined them and made them distinct from other races...but now that intrinsic signature styling is being compromised and they just look like any other ship out there. Just run of the mill and not distinctive. The crappy CGI at that time and the laziness in using it didn't help.

The Enterprise in the reboots is the direction I'd go. I think that's the best looking ship so far. It's an example of how to evolve the styling but keep the fundamental signatures.
 gingerosity
Joined: 12/10/2011
Msg: 7
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Star Trek
Posted: 11/26/2016 5:43:09 PM

What you'll have is the mystery and adventure of exploration but the feel of them truly being on their own with not much backup/support mostly (and a perpetually uneasy/mixed relationship with Earth since no one officially sanctioned their endeavor), and not part of a bigger formal organization. And it'd be approximately present-day so the world in this show is a kind of starting-over in that there're no Romulans or Vulcans, etc, and everything really is unknown other than what we've gathered with our telescopes and probes.

The closest I can think of to that vibe is the comedy Red Dwarf, inspired by the film Dark Star. The early series were brilliant, although because of the humour the style is very different to serious sci-fi. The ship environment and exploration of space and near-future technology is primarily a vehicle for witty character interactions. And being a mining ship constructed over centuries in various different styles, it is deliberately ugly and therefore cooler than cool.
 xlr8ingme
Joined: 11/2/2016
Msg: 8
Star Trek
Posted: 11/26/2016 5:52:38 PM
I simply believe space exploration of any kind is really cool. I hope I live long enough to actually see that man has made it to Mars on the news.
 gingerosity
Joined: 12/10/2011
Msg: 9
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Star Trek
Posted: 11/26/2016 7:21:05 PM
I hope I live to see the microgravity porn industry take off (literally). Should be pretty funny.
 xlr8ingme
Joined: 11/2/2016
Msg: 10
Star Trek
Posted: 11/26/2016 7:48:46 PM
Even I would imagine it would be quite funny, but very gosh darn expensive to "get it off" the ground. lol!

No matter how much we change we can never get away from ourselves...
Star Trek
Posted: 11/27/2016 1:01:58 PM
I remember dark star. But haven't seen any red dwarf. Nor much Quark...is it any good? Funny at all?

Oh, and as a kid I thought the ship in blake's 7 was interesting for it's tri radially symmetrical design.

But per the op topic...just not sure if I could get into that subject. Best thing I can think of is how it seems that in the Star Trek world the acquisition of personal wealth is an obsolete idea. People are somehow taken care of yet have freedom, and they choose to make achievements or contributions for it's own sake. Don't think that's such a bad idea.

Microgravity porn...allegedly porn is a significant percentage of business for whatever medium it uses, at least startup. So that may be the thing which economically bootstraps our endeavors in space. Aliens will ask how we got started in space, and we'll answer that we f-cked ourselves there.

I hereby predict that interspecies orgy porn will mark our first relationship with E.T.'s. I hope everybody wears condoms and tentacle dams.
 xlr8ingme
Joined: 11/2/2016
Msg: 12
Star Trek
Posted: 11/27/2016 5:01:48 PM
I was watching a program where CERN has discovered a way to transfer one single atom from one place to another. Kind of like the teleportation concept. However the atom was duplicated, but both maintained the exact same qualities there after. They also said this scientific process (in relation to the human body), with current technology would take billions of years. This same program also referred to Spock's mind meld. There is a lab in upstate NY that is currently working on this basic concept through computer technology. A subject is able to think of an alphabetical letter, and the computer is able to "read" which one it is. Electrodes in the fashion similar to an E.E.G. were used to read brain waves. We do have cell phones, in which the concept of a communicator was predicted. I find this all "fascinating indeed"...

I do remember the Alien movies. They must have forgotten about those tentacle "dams".

Dr. Who is cool, but I am unfamiliar with any of the other shows mentioned.
Star Trek
Posted: 11/27/2016 5:12:25 PM
Anybody seen any of The Expanse? It any good? I've barely seen any of it. Think it might be good though.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f_9g2nXpYl0

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ChPYnxL8-iU
 pfif
Joined: 8/25/2013
Msg: 14
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Mars
Posted: 11/27/2016 8:34:59 PM
Currently:

Mars_(miniseries) on Wikipedia.

Mars is a six-part docudrama television miniseries produced by
National Geographic, which premiered on November 14, 2016,
on their channel, and FX.

[me] /Mars/ is inspiring in that it doesn't sugar-coat it: it's
going to be quite the labor, to get there, if we get there.

No hand-waving the real problems, away -- and that's exciting;
that is how it has to be.

Gender roles explored.

We have enough now, behind us, to start fictionalizing things
with some accuracy, and without the comic book simplification.


Previously:

2001: a Space Odyssey -- and the NASA Apollo program.

I was headed for a career as a naturalist, prior to the
Apollo missions (I delivered the afternoon newspaper on
my bicycle the summer of the moon landing). Also, several
visits to a science classroom maintained by the entire county
(every town had access to it). My dad built a Heathkit FM
tuner; I helped. I went into electronic repair (and easy
experiments; soldering, kit building). I got my first kit
at age 9 (my parents usually got me science-oriented toys
at christmas time; one year it was geology themed, but
in 1969 it was electronics -- I'm still doing that today).

. .


It's late and the /Mars/ program is waiting in another window,
on another desktop (Fluxbox). See you.
 xlr8ingme
Joined: 11/2/2016
Msg: 15
Mars
Posted: 11/27/2016 10:04:56 PM
^ Thank you ever so kindly for the exciting post! Hope to read you again in these forums sometime...
 gingerosity
Joined: 12/10/2011
Msg: 16
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Star Trek
Posted: 11/28/2016 6:03:34 AM

But haven't seen any red dwarf. Nor much Quark...is it any good? Funny at all?

My teenage self found Red Dwarf very funny. Should start at the beginning of series 1 (don't just jump in anywhere) and see how you go. I stopped watching about halfway through the 12 series as the material and ideas wore thin, and only saw the odd episode after that. Don't know Quark or the Expanse... looks interesting.

it seems that in the Star Trek world the acquisition of personal wealth is an obsolete idea. People are somehow taken care of yet have freedom, and they choose to make achievements or contributions for it's own sake. Don't think that's such a bad idea.

Sounds nice but it has never worked very well to date. Maybe with more slave-bots our natural inclination to "conserve energy" when it comes to the common good will be less of a hindrance to sustainability of the space commune.

Aliens will ask how we got started in space, and we'll answer that we f-cked ourselves there.

Well it got us this far, but test tube babies and cloning could make it purely recreational moving forward. I wonder what effect reduced gravity has on foetal development? We might need to grow embryos in a centrifuge on Mars/elsewhere until we can engineer them to be low gravity-tolerant.
Star Trek
Posted: 11/28/2016 10:45:35 AM
The Mars show - Oh no, not Mars again. There is just no reason to send people to Mars. It's a waste of effort, except for maybe...and only maybe...the interest that it drums up and jobs it creates. I'm getting to the point where it makes me ill when I hear about manned Mars missions. Unless and until we come up with some completely new and different family of technologies, primarily in the area of propulsion, we should stop wasting our time sending people anywhere beyond Earth orbit.

I wonder what effect reduced gravity has on foetal development? We might need to grow embryos in a centrifuge on Mars/elsewhere until we can engineer them to be low gravity-tolerant.

I just happened to be wondering lately...since the experience of gravity, and close to 1 earth-G at that, is inescapably important for Humans in space...if a child is born into a significantly lower gravity and grows up in that, might their physiology not have the same problems as we would?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qwoWo4ChYuQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omLGFy3voyI
 kidreason29
Joined: 9/25/2015
Msg: 18
Star Trek
Posted: 11/28/2016 10:46:07 PM
star trek? Spock and Data, need I say more? ha

More ideas come to mind with the possibilities of virtual reality, I can be anyone, or anything, and I can believe it all to be true.

The universe also expands through virtual reality. Eventually everything will be in virtual reality and the 'ultimate fate of the universe' is no longer a problem.

If everything contained outside of virtual reality were simulated inside virtual reality, the creator of the virtual reality will have the variables of time dilation. To make go time faster but appear at a normal rate, effectively allows for the V.R computer to compute as many universes as it can with the time allocated within the universe it is in.

No need to worry, someone in futures got our backs, and there backs, and so on.
 pfif
Joined: 8/25/2013
Msg: 19
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Star Trek
Posted: 11/29/2016 2:33:11 PM
xlr8ingme: hello!

Thanks for the greeting. Appreciated.

drink: greets.

Mars is interesting in that we can land functional robots on
its surface, and do simple exploration of it -- that's fairly
unique, and tasks us at a 12 minute communications latency,
one-way (24 minutes, minimum, to get feedback from a
command sent to a robot).

Living there? No. Not conceivable, once money is considered
(economic cost of habitation is prohibitive). The National
Geographic series makes it clear that 'Mars tries to kill you'
every way it can, all the time.

May as well design a special diving suit to go scuba diving
in a giant vat of sulphuric acid -- what for?

Elon Musk claims he believes Mars is our attainable insurance
against existential risk (extinction events and the like, on Earth).
Star Trek
Posted: 11/29/2016 4:19:36 PM
There's no reason to go to Mars anyway. With people, as opposed to semi automated tele presence. Even a quite sophisticated colony per our current technological and economic capabilities and allowing for even a century of development, it would not be any kind of insurance against extinction. And this talk of terraforming Mars is just as ridiculous.

A Human presence in space isn't the only thing for us to do, and endeavors taking place on very, very long time scales are also always an option...but, for any kind of Human presence in space that is practical, self-sustained, has any point to it, and doesn't require really long time scales, we need to somehow make some game-changing breakthroughs in physics and develop technologies wholly different and unrecognizable compared to what we have now. Without that, we're stuck. period. Except for very long term plans, or things which don't include live people going out there. Otherwise we're just trying to twist and squeeze what we have now to get something out of it that just isn't there.
 xlr8ingme
Joined: 11/2/2016
Msg: 21
Star Trek
Posted: 11/29/2016 7:38:05 PM
I was raised on the north shore of Long Island, and I remember the Apollo missions when I was a kid. We had district wide school assemblies with visitors from N.A.S.A. In my old room at my mom's faded half scraped stickers remain from these events. They are in the closet on the hanging mirror. Theres one from Apollo 14, when I was in the second grade (?). Our household is really big on technology; my father was an electronic engineer, my uncle was a mechanical engineer, and my brother is an electrical engineer. My dad would sit and watch re-runs of the old Star Trek with me till he passed away in 2006. Shoot my brother and I still do, sharing our memories of him. So for me to hear that man can make it to Mars while I'm alive is exciting as heck, no matter how long of a time scale. This is the stuff dreams are made of, coming true before our eyes. I don't know about any of you, but it all adds much happiness to my heart :)
 pfif
Joined: 8/25/2013
Msg: 22
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Star Trek
Posted: 1/2/2019 7:26:22 PM
^ I shoulda hit on that. ;)

j/k

drink: Excellent post (and expressed points of view). Spot on.

(sorry about the latency!)

I'm still an Elon Musk fanboy -- I think he's FOS about Mars,
but it's not my money he's spending.

(and I don't get a cut, if he wins, either)
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