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Show ALL Forums  > Off Topic  > Home renovations...Quiet Rock      Home login  
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 AwP
Joined: 12/31/2006
Msg: 2
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Home renovations...Quiet RockPage 1 of 1    
From my understanding of it, it would work much better if the soundproofing was on their side of the wall. The texture has alot to do with it because it will break up the soundwaves, so on their side of the wall they could use something relatively thin and it would work well. On your side you're probably stuck using something thicker unless you're willing to use something more expensive. I'm unfamilier with quietrock, so I couldn't tell you if it's worth the money or not. If muffling the sound is good enough (as opposed to actually blocking it completely) then you have alot more options, you could even do something as simple as hanging comforters on the walls like tapestries.
 AwP
Joined: 12/31/2006
Msg: 5
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Home renovations...Quiet Rock
Posted: 3/20/2008 4:55:16 PM

The problem is that the guy that's doing the work for me is unfamiliar with the product. You can't buy it at places like Home Depot, you have to go to a specialty place, and his theory is that if it's such a good product then Home Depot would be selling it.

Get a new guy, yours is an idiot. Home Depo is a handy place to buy common items, but they really don't have much at all in the way of top notch products.
 Patient50
Joined: 9/16/2007
Msg: 6
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Home renovations...Quiet Rock
Posted: 3/20/2008 8:03:49 PM
Fine Homebuilding magazine had an article a while ago about sound proofing walls, etc. The article got into the science of how sound is transmitted, and effective ways to stop it. I don't remember the specifics of their recommendations, but I seem to remember that just sticking fiberglass insulation in the wall cavity is mostly a waste of money.

I just found the issue - issue no. 187, January 2007, page 55. Our library has this magazine, and back issues are available from their website (finehomebuilding.com) or you might get lucky on eBay.

The article mentions a special type of drywall which may be similar to QuietRock, but I'm not certain.

It would be a good idea to continue to research rather than just throw money at it in the hope that something works.

Good luck!
 Brian T
Joined: 1/25/2006
Msg: 7
Home renovations...Quiet Rock
Posted: 3/21/2008 5:20:19 PM
I'm not familiar with the construction of townhouse walls. I would have expected them to be more substantial than a stud framework with sheetrock to separate two homes. But, if this is what you have, something I read about might help.

Trying to insulate the inside the wall still has the sound hitting the wall going through the sheetrock , the stud and the other piece of sheetrock. If you are going to open up your wall, you could put in new studs that dont touch the sheetrock in the other home. Keep it ,say, a half inch away. Put in any insulating material and re-sheetrock.This would make the wall a half inch thicker, or you could use studs that are 3" instead of the normal 3 1/2" studs. Now the studs won't transmit the sound.

I'm only suggesting that if you open the wall you might consider this. I would probably go the "hanging something as a tapestry" route ,first. Good Luck
 Lone_Stranger
Joined: 4/12/2008
Msg: 10
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Home renovations...Quiet Rock
Posted: 4/27/2008 1:23:40 AM
Sound we hear traveling through a wall or floor is actually vibration being transfered through the wall, you need a vibration break combined with insulation.
Modern building code requires 2 seperate insulated party walls between units that serve as both a vibration and fire break.
It should be something like this.

5/8" firestop gyproc
2x4 stud wall & r-12 insulation
donacona or similar sound deadening board
1"- 2" space
donacona again
2x4 stud wall & r-12 insulation
5/8" firestop gyproc

Some buildings have simpler versions of this using a single 6" or 8" wall with staggered 2x4 studs but they are'nt as effective.
Using a vibration deadening bar like resilient chanel (mentioned above) with a new layer of gyproc, special sheating products that insulate against sound would be even better.
But in your case to break the tranfer of vibration you will need that resilient chanel underneath any new layer of sheeting
 toolbelt46
Joined: 5/5/2007
Msg: 11
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Home renovations...Quiet Rock
Posted: 3/10/2010 7:57:04 PM
one thing you've all overlooked is that if there are any outlets or switches located on those walls to be soundproofed, and its doubtful there are any doors/windows between units, the easiest (and most cost effective) solution would quiet rock, and then adding electrical box extensions to bring them back flush with the new walls thickness. as your sheets will be hung vertically, all but the corner joints will be tapered, and the ceiling joint can be either taped or covered with crownmoulding. a weekend's work and youre done!!!
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