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 Author Thread: Mathematics: Optimization.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 7 (view)
 
Mathematics: Optimization.
Posted: 7/5/2009 8:24:25 PM
Early in numerical methods I remember splitting a problem where x was positive only, into two problems (1 to infinity), and the other one where 1/x was running again 1 to infinity. Most people numerically integrated the problem from 0 to infinity, it happened that my approach was better in this instance. But numerical methods always seems to devious for generalities. As soon as you decided you will take a certain approach, a strange data set comes along and makes you wish you never seen the method you just thought was so good. I do too much numerical methods to like this, I would rather stay away from infinity unless I have reason to use it.

But, seeing as I offered a spline idea, perhaps someone has a comment. I am currently arguing with some GPS data. A possible solution offers itself as: Douglas-Peucker algorithm, Ramers algorithm, or Iterative End Points Fit. As near as I can tell, this algorithm requires little error in the data. This is not what I am seeing with GPS data, especially when I enter the part of the bicycle path that is in the trees. Serial correlation is also going to be strong, because a Kalman filter is being used in the GPS unit to provide position estimates. If instead of finding which points to ignore in fitting either a straight line or a constant to an interval, I looked at what points to ignore which were midway between data points, does that produce a better solution? Any other ideas?

Looking at the original solution, they want me to precompute N^2+N terms so that the segmentation can be done in linear time. I've got about 100 files, each with 1000 data points. I don't fancy storing O(100000) sums for each of those 100 files in order to segment the files into linear and constant regions. This is just starting an analysis, I've got a bunch of other stuff to do later. But the end result is to produce a good 3D model of the bicycle path in my city to the local government. Traveling it so many times by bicycle is just getting exercise.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 4 (view)
 
Mathematics: Optimization.
Posted: 7/5/2009 5:52:02 PM
Why can't you use one-sided derivatives at the endpoints? If one compares your problem to fitting splines, the derivatives are completely defined at the endpoints.

But, if one finds all locations of zero slope in the interval, and then finds the function values at those points, all one needs to do is append to your list, the function values at the 2 endpoints. Comparing that augmented list of extrema, choosing which is the maximum (or minimum) should be fairly easy. Even though it is mostly about linear problems, in operations research when I last looked at it, one never even considered the interior, the only place one looked was the boundaries.

Numerically, looking for zero slope is going to have problems. Which I believe is pointed out.

If your problem behaves like a low order polynomial, you might try approximating by polynomial splines (2 or 3 order) and analytically calculating the zeros. And then add in the endpoints.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 18 (view)
 
What happened to the Wild West?
Posted: 7/5/2009 4:36:06 PM
I still don't see this premise as being useful. Forcing everyone to have a "gun" doesn't equalize anything. A .177 pellet gun does not compare to a .45 handgun or to a .50 sniper's rifle. A RPG is in a sense a gun. Last time I brought up a modern British howitzer (M777). It is not able to be "carried" by a single person, but it is a gun. If one goes to muskets (which aren't rifled), they probably have the worst accuracy. There are variables at play in your example which are not displayed. If everyone has about the same kind of gun, and about the same skills with that gun; there is in a sense a level playing field there.

A few years back, I ran across an exercise to draft a constitution up for a hypothetical lunar (on the Moon) colony. Of course, some American had the right to bear arms in that document. Which I never could understand. You are living in a vacuum. One stray bullet and everybody dies. It is about the same as having a (big) bomb.

There has got to be other ways of reducing crime rates.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 20 (view)
 
Silicon..
Posted: 7/5/2009 12:43:25 PM
Steel roofs? Copper or slate will both outlast steel for roofs. Oh slate, has silicon in it.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 8 (view)
 
What happened to the Wild West?
Posted: 7/4/2009 5:40:21 PM
Fine, someone has run across a single instance where the local government forcing residents to have guns _APPEARS_ to have reduced crime rates. Are their other jurisdictions where similar laws were inacted? What results are they seeing?

Is there some unique quality about this community which makes this result predictable? What would need to happen for this situation to change there?

What constitutes a gun? Handgun? Berretta 0.22? Colt .45? Rifle? Winchester .308? A .50 Sniper rifle? Tommy gun? Shotgun? M-16? Bazooka? British M777 Howitzer?

Does this work for any type of weapon? Can we force all households to have a crossbow, and still have this work? How about bombs? Is a bundle of 10 sticks of TNT equivalent to a gun?

I'm sorry. For me, this story is just about a statistical aberration. It appears to have worked here, now. It may not work in the future at this location, and probably doesn't work elsewhere now (or in the future). I am not doubting the accuracy of the story, I just think it is a statistical fluke.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 8 (view)
 
Silicon..
Posted: 7/3/2009 2:21:55 PM
To build anything out of rock, is to at least in part build it out of silicon. Silicon likes to form a tetrahedral network with oxygen, and a lot of allying can happen in that structure. Common sand is relatively pure silicon dioxide, as is quartz rock. Alumino-silicates are alloys of silicon dioxide and aluminum oxide. Many rocks are aluminosilicates, and many cements are composed in part of aluminosilicates. Silicon is used in steel, mostly as a "getter" for oxygen. It is used in many magnetic steels for particular influences that silicon has in alloying with iron. It shows up in many coatings, since it may be possible to form a dense, adherent oxide coating if silicon is part of the coating (not all silicon containing coatings form dense, adherent oxides).
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 3 (view)
 
Testosterone
Posted: 7/3/2009 6:16:59 AM
It's there to cause those of us genetically predisposed to male pattern baldness, to lose hair. If you have the trait and no testosterone, you keep your hair. (I gather it is the dihydro form in particular that is involved in hair loss.)

All of the hormones are related to each other, one being low or high causes the system to shift all of them in various directions. Consequently, you probably need to examine all the hormones at the same time, and not just one in particular.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 52 (view)
 
Moon Landings - Question.
Posted: 7/1/2009 6:24:12 PM
It might take a few trips. Offer everyone who thinks it is a hoax, a free ride. Put them in containers (sections of an airplane hull?), and haul them to the Moon. Offload the containers, come back to get more people. Do this until all of them are on the Moon. When they run out of oxygen, or decided to open the door and find vacuum, they'll realize it was never a hoax.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 6 (view)
 
International Space Station
Posted: 6/30/2009 8:00:09 AM
Spaceweather.com recently pointed to some pictures taken from ISS of the Sarychev (sp?) volcano. Apparently ISS was over top of Sarychev, when it erupted. This was I believe the first time that an eruption has been photographed from above.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 20 (view)
 
NASA to bomb the moon-why?
Posted: 6/29/2009 8:38:43 AM
A few groups have done similar things, looking to bring back He-3. I believe the He-3 ideas are feasible financially. I believe bring back something like a tonne of rock for gram quantity souvenirs also comes close to breakeven.

For me, if someone is going to go to the Moon to bring back rocks or He-3, they are going to be leaving stuff behind as well. I would like them to leave behind parts, machines, ... made of very particular things: Cu, Ag, V, Sn and a handful of other elements. That way, when we try to set up a base on the Moon, we have a source of alloying elements to use with the Al, Ti and Fe we can find there now. The silver and copper are pretty easy to include as wire for electrical wiring. Vanadium can substitute for Fe in a few places. I have no idea what kind of component one would build out of Sn. I suppose something will come to mind eventually.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 10 (view)
 
NASA to bomb the moon-why?
Posted: 6/28/2009 5:33:49 PM
Most of what know about the Moon (or other bodies) is passive. The body is in some kind of an environment, and we watch to find out something about it.

Our ability to make accurate determinations depends on how much we know about the environment and all the interactions which end up in the response we observe.

In an active experiment, we are imposing a stimulus at our time of choosing. We analyze everything we see within a reasonable time-frame of that event, and hope to recover good information.

Doing an abrupt experiment (such as crashing something into the Moon) is of a short time frame, we only see information for a very short period of time. In a passive experiment, the data can almost be forever. They are complementary. What is nice about the "impact" experiments, is that they may provide us with information which makes the passive experiment easier to understand.

In order to get dating information, you need to excite nuclear levels (energy levels in the nucleus). It is not likely that the impact will be exciting nuclear energy levels.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 4 (view)
 
NASA to bomb the moon-why?
Posted: 6/28/2009 4:26:07 PM
It depends on how you define "bomb". What has been happening, is that satellites or fractions of satellites are being allowed (or directed) to impact the Moon. Or other bodies (an impactor was designed to run into another body).

These collisions are all about kinetic energy, there is no explosive on board. That is why I question the definition of bomb.

If an inbound projectile impacts with sufficient kinetic energy, some "parent" material is kicked up. The energy of the collision often means that a significant fraction of the kicked up parent material is at high temperature, and as it cools it may give rise to radiation (colours of light usually) which we can detect. In essence, we are doing chemistry on the remote body. In a sense, this is similar to a technology called PIXE (Proton Induced X-ray Emission).

As far as we know, all small bodies in the solar system lack low atomic number elements (Carbon, Hydrogen, Oxygen, ...). If a fluke of geography of the Moon has allowed it to accumulate some low atomic number elements near the south lunar pole, that is useful.

(I am ignoring the fact that some meteorites and asteroids contain low atomic number materials. The problem is that they are never around when you need them.)
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 16 (view)
 
Moon Landings - Question.
Posted: 6/25/2009 8:22:55 PM
Actually the "dust" problem is worse. It seems that with "daylight" comes a lot of static charging. The dust can stay suspended for significantly longer than 6 minutes. That all of the dust particles have sharp edges (never weathered) aggravates problems with the dust.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 9 (view)
 
Moon Landings - Question.
Posted: 6/25/2009 4:31:03 PM
As I remember things, all of the Moon landings were more or less near dawn. That was to avoid the very cold lunar night and the very hot lunar day. A "day" on the Moon is nominally the same as a month on Earth (the same face of the Moon is seen on Earth all the time). While "dawn" is an hour or two on Earth, on the Moon it is considerably longer (10-30 hours).
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 5 (view)
 
Moon Landings - Question.
Posted: 6/25/2009 2:53:15 PM
How hot? Someone else mentioned about 100C (which is the temperature water boils at on Earth), the number I've seen is a bit higher. It is hot enough that some aluminium alloys would be questionable due to "coarsening" reactions. Lunar night is cryogenic (similar to temperatures needed for liquified gases such as oxygen and nitrogen). Regions of permanent shadow near the poles are considerably colder.

The buggy is still there.

Define valuable? There are thought to be considerable reserves of a rare isotope of helium (He-3) in the regolith (soil) of the Moon. Fusion reactions involving He-3 have many advantages over fusion reactions considered from reactants easily available on Earth. A few people have developed strawman business plans to bring He-3 to Earth.

In general, the number of processes which can concentrate minerals are much fewer on the Moon than on Earth. Which makes it less likely that valuable ores will be found. If we develop a presence on the Moon (Mars, asteroid belt, ...), what is more likely to happen is that we will need to process to the end, any suitable material. There will be uses for the minor and trace elements of any resource, which will probably preclude the resource being used directly. For example, typical of cryogenic "steels", we need 9% or more nickel. There is a component of the regolith (soil) which is actually nickel-iron meteorite "dust". Some of these nickel-iron meteorites are only about 9% nickel. Others are considerably higher in nickel. But they also have a lot of other metals which are useful for other purposes. To try and make an iron structure (probably not a steel, as carbon is hard to find too) from this nickel-iron meteorite fraction is probably not too difficult. The problem is that we then lose all the other non-necessary elements (cobalt and others) which are really not needed in terms of what we know on Earth for building structures.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 5 (view)
 
World first for strange molecule
Posted: 4/25/2009 9:05:51 AM
This forum thread title relates to the BBC article referenced, and all of your text is nominally related to the wikipedia article. But the wikipedia article has nothing to do with the BBC article.

The strange molecule is a peculiar molecule whereby a single electron of one atoms happens to be in an orbit much larger than usual, and another atom slips "inside" the orbit. It is called a Rydberg molecule. An atom that has one of its electrons in this "huge" orbit, is called a Rydberg atom. Temperatures for all of this to happen have to be very close to absolute zero.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 1 (view)
 
EOL/Mayan/2012/...: Filters for Science/Philosophy please! [CLOSED Thread]
Posted: 3/8/2009 3:45:17 PM
It is not that there isn't enough conspiracy theorists and what not in the world, but we occasionally have "opportunities" for the nuts to come out of the wood work. Hey, if you want them in the Fitness/Health thread, that is fine. However, in the Science/Philosophy thread, we really don't need any more posting about the world ending in 2012 for this, that or the other reason. None of these people originating threads have any scientific knowledge, they don't present peer-reviewed references to support their arguments, most of the arguments are of the circular "if you believe ... and so you should believe" type.

If there was a way to convince the various conspiracy theorists of the world that they were wrong, I don't think the few scientists, mathematicians and engineers on POF would mind. But it is a never ending series of irrational arguments, rumour, unsupported arguments, and so on.

It is only 2009. Come late 2012, we could be swimming in this nonsense. Can we add 2012 as a reason to delete threads in Science/Philosophy? I suppose another option is to split Science/Philosophy into a Science and Philosophy threads, and then please disallow 2012 threads on the Science side. If the Philosophers want to argue 2012, by all means let them.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 22 (view)
 
South Pole Infra Red Telescope, what is it tracking ?
Posted: 3/8/2009 8:58:52 AM
The searching I did yesterday vis a vis this mythical dwarf had it being outside the outer Oort Cloud, about 25% of the distance to Proxima Centuri. This infra-red telescopy mission going up in November should be able to see a brown dwarf that close. If it is in a stable orbit out there, I can't see it suddenly changing in the next 3 years to do something nasty. Besides, it would probably still take a while to get here.

WRT the trivia comment about where my nickname comes from.
In terms of computer languages, FORTRAN will always be the best language for number crunching. It won't be FORTRAN-IV, but it will be FORTRAN of some kind. However, it is not a machine language, or at least not any more so than C.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 15 (view)
 
South Pole Infra Red Telescope, what is it tracking ?
Posted: 3/7/2009 2:13:30 PM
November of this year, a satellite is being launched which will be able to see this supposed dwarf, if it exists. The reason to put infra-red telescopes in cold places, is that infra-red is basically heat. Putting an optical telescope somewhere sunny is not a good idea either, which is why they do most of their work at night. The permanent shadows at the south Pole of the Moon will be quite nice for infra-red telescopy.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 7 (view)
 
Symmetric molecules
Posted: 3/2/2009 6:49:29 AM
I would have thought such symmetry principles might be developed through statistical mechanics, but I ran across too much noise in trying to get a reference to something. But I could easily see a physicist using symmetry transformations in working with the partition function.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 13 (view)
 
Einstein vs. Newton
Posted: 3/2/2009 6:45:33 AM

..., i just want you guys to answer Whose contribution affected the world in more positive ways?


Simply the fact that Newton's work has been around longer, would produce this result. It has nothing to do with who was the better scientist. It takes time for knowledge to filter down from mathematics to science to engineering.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 17 (view)
 
The physics of color
Posted: 2/23/2009 4:31:24 PM
People (such as the group known as CIE (sorry, I haven't memorized the definition, I believe it is French) have an interest in the colour response of people. Most of the models that people know of, are "triangular" models, and so we talk about mixing the 3 apexes of the response curve. This model works reasonable well, but there are colours which we can see, that are not within the realm of the the triangular model. This isn't something I spend a lot of time on, but I believe a lot of what we perceive as "brown" lies outside of the triangle of RYB.

What colour we see, is a function of three things: the spectrum illuminating the object, the absorption curve of the surface, and the response curve of the human eye (which is different for different people). There are a few people which have 4 kinds of chromophores (wavelength sensitive receptors), I believe they are all women, but they can see far more colours than the average person can.

The incoming light is not a combination of three delta functions (some particular red, some particular blue and some particular yellow). But we can arrange experiments where 3 laser sources of the correct wavelength are used, and people perceive the light as white (at least in theory).

All surfaces which we view as coloured, have absorption curves that are unique functions of wavelength. If we look at all of the surfaces which most people reagard as being red, their absorption curves are not the same, unless the atoms sampled within the extinction distance of the surface are the same. The extinction distance is typically small, microns would be a typical estimate.

All humans have different response curves (even disregarding the few female humans which have 4 sets of chromphores) in their sight.

That people can agree about colours amongst different people is a function of the illumination source, the surface being observed, and the individuals response to the spectrum coming into the eyes. And for most people to recognize that under natural sunlight (constant spectrum), that some particular surface is almost uniformly described (constant absorption function) is the same, is testament to how we train ourselves to assign "labels" to colours.

The people interested in photography probably have the best practical theory about how all of this is related. Older material may not recognize that some females have 4 chromophores.

For me as a materials engineer/scientist, the thing I want to know most, is what is the whitest substance? And I believe the current best material is a specific kind of titanium dioxide.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 12 (view)
 
GMO issue.
Posted: 2/18/2009 5:04:03 PM
I go along with the others. All of evolution (remember Darwin) is about modifying the gene. And we continue to find weird and wonderful ways that nature has modified the genes before we even started to play these games. If one wants a demonstration of what nature can do, just look at the history of the influenza virus. We have human hosts (that we hope to save), bird hosts, and pig hosts. It is possible it is more complicated that this, but it seems that pigs are the bridge to bring avian influenza into human influenza.

Extinctions are Heaviside (square wave) functions on a geological timescale. That society can do in 1 year which nature can do in 100 or 1000 years still shows up as a square wave in the geologic record.

Mankind has messed with the global warming gases, mass balances tremendously in the last few decades (more so now than long ago). To expect nature to take geological time to fix this problem is the same as to commit suicide. Yes, 1 million years from now, the problems of global warming will not exist. It is entirely possible that mankind does not exist as well. We now that invasive species (and genome) problems can exist. If we come up with a good way to alter the greenhouse gas mass balance problem, especially one which has a trigger which we can pull, is this not a good thing?

However, in the near term, if we put our heads in the sand, we get warmer temperatures and better suntans. And who cares if life doesn't exist in a couple of generations? Just as long as we can lie on the beach, get a tan, a good refreshment, and something good to eat at the end of the day.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 8 (view)
 
doctor fixed results about danger of vaccine
Posted: 2/11/2009 6:57:50 AM
Ars Technica has an article that involves this topic in part, and the comments thread is reasonable.

http://arstechnica.com/science/news/2009/02/when-bad-science-meets-the-law.ars

I only took up Ars Technica recently, I used to follow slashdot, but it got to be far too noisy. I was actually quite impressed by this comment thread. It may be that Ars is statistically the same as /. but a sample of 1 or 2 isn't significant. :-)

To try and combine a few different stories, if (some aspects of) Autism are tied to inflammation of the brain, I wonder if putting those infrared headbands (mindreading) on children about to be immunized might not be a reasonable thing to do? Certainly these children are not able to vocalize all of their concerns before and after immunizing, and maybe this "mind reading" technology might allow one to identify situations of concern at a very early stage?
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 5 (view)
 
doctor fixed results about danger of vaccine
Posted: 2/9/2009 3:00:33 PM
My feeling is that this vaccine idea has always been tenuous at best. I was born in 1960, had all the shots I was supposed to have, when scheduled and I have a "slight" case of Autism (AS). If it wasn't for the fact I can't sell myself to save my life, I may never had learned that I had Autism. In any event, I feel obligated to at least consider every hair-brained idea that someone comes up with for Autism. Not that I think anything is going to cure me, but because I think I should do something for others that have Autism, and are effected far worse than I am. But it is about time that some of these screwy ideas got shot down, not that I think it is going to stop the people with the tin foil hats screwed on too tight from inventing more.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 31 (view)
 
Revolutionary auto technology
Posted: 2/9/2009 11:02:12 AM
Sure we can run cars on solar, how long do you want to take to get there? If the destination is higher in elevation than the beginning, we need to make up that change in potential energy. If we travel with any speed, air resistance typically scales as the square of the (wind) speed. We have rolling resistance of the tires and friction of the various moving parts. All of that energy is coming from your solar power. Are you in less of a hurry when it is cloudy or raining? What about at night?
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 30 (view)
 
Revolutionary auto technology
Posted: 2/9/2009 9:10:04 AM
I think there is probably lots of room for improvement in electrical usage, for automobiles or other purposes.

Inertia (social inertia, not physics) slows a lot of change. Is there a reason why we use 60 Hz AC in some places and 50 Hz AC in others? I am not talking about the economic need, since the grid requires that all generators pumping energy in be at the same frequency and in phase. Is 60 Hz noticeably better 47 Hz or 73.1286 Hz, or any other arbitrarily chosen frequency? Would we as consumers be better off running at some other frequency? Perhaps households run more efficiently at twice the line frequency?

If we look at DC, we have 40 VDC systems, 12 VDC, 5 VDC, and others. Twelve volt is a convenient multiple of 1.5 V cells that nominally are lead-acid. But, if we are going to use fuel cells, or lithium batteries, or whatever; is there a reason to stick to 12 V?

In terms of energy storage, chemical batteries are convenient in a lot of situations. But energy can be stored in lots of other ways: flywheels, capacitors, pumping water uphill, superconducting storage rings, pressurizing a volume with a gas. Of that collection, I really don't like compressed gas storage, to me it seems like a loose cannon waiting to inflict damage on the unsuspecting.

As far as going back to horse and buggy goes, if some of you like that lifestyle, you really should move somewhere where technology isn't around. Too many people find technology too convenient.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 33 (view)
 
Autism Treatments GF/CF Diet
Posted: 2/2/2009 2:55:25 PM
What is validating something? I say something, you try it, it works for you. Is that validation? Look, I have autism, I am not trying to stop things which work. I am trying to minimize how much is done over and over and over again which at best has no effect. If ti works once for you, and doesn't work 99 times for other people, does it work? The answer is no. Sorry, I was trained as an engineer and scientist. You know that autistic people will study something to death. If you have data a person can work with, I can deal with that. But testimonials are more or less useless.

I'll put any person's experiments with gluten free (or gluten free, casein free) against what has been done in the Celiac community. Research has found the specific peptide which cause the problem. It doesn't matter whether it is the gluten from any kind of wheat, from barley, from rye, or from anything else. If that peptide is present, the Celiac patient is going to have problems.

You do not see anything like this in people talking about GF or GF-CF diets for people with autism. It is entirely possible that there is some small benefit from either GF or GF-CF diets for people with autism. There is no data to support that either gluten or casein has anything to do with how autism develops, or how to treat it. And I will not entertain suggestions that this diet has anything to do with curing it. Our brains are different, and changing our diet is not going to make our brains different.

Look, when I do statistics, I want to have at least 10^5 (100,000) items in the sample that are all valid. Preferably, I want much more than that. Most of the problems with autism in any respect, are a few hundred or thousand. It is really easy to lose what is actually happening in the statistical noise of small samples.

On the other side, I cannot fault parents for trying to find what works for their children. I know my Mom had me into the doctor for years, and the doctor never clued into autism. I was almost 41 years old before I learned I had autism. Yes, I was "lucky" to be high functioning, but my adult life has been entirely as screwed up as any child with autism. I don't know if my input could have solved the world's problems due to bankster excess, but I do know that had any employer decided to give me a chance I could have made a lot of money from there decision. And so, I continue to languish doing things I am poorly equipped to do, in the hopes that some day a person can recognize me for being among the best in the world at materials science and engineering.,

Even though I think both the GF or GF-CF diets are red herrings, I cannot let it alone. If something, regardless of how strange it is to me, works, I will do what I can to help people. There is no reason for people to suffer.

In the case of Celiac people, they can move to using a number of things to make up for gluten. From what I have read, the most important compound is Xanthan. Xanthan is a byproduct of using glucose/sucrose to make other things. Guar gum, arrowroot, locust bean and agar-agar are among the things I have found to help in removing gluten from a diet. Gluten is not a compound you can measure in something, it is a result. In wheat, gluten is a combination of two proteins (sorry, Internet is escaping me now). In terms of Celiac disease, I am not sure where the bad peptide is (which or both or the two proteins in question). I would be really surprised if the single peptide which causes problems for Celiacs is the same peptide which causes problems for autistics.

There are ways to work around what gluten provides in terms of the use of flour. The alternatives all seem to be agents which adjust viscosity, which is part (not all) of what gluten does. It is not surprising to me, that none of them singly ( on their own) acts as a replacement for gluten. I think that the better replacements are going to use one or more of: xanthan, guar, arrowroot, locust bean,
agar-agar, or others. It seems likely, that any baked product which normally requires gluten, is going to use xanthan (and others) in a mix of flours which is much higher in protein than we would see "normally". And unless you happen to be lucky and find a recipe, you are going to be experimenting.

Most bread recipes talk about rising, punching it down, and re-rising. As near as I can tell, it doesn't matter what non-gluten version you talk about, you cannot punch it down. You mix the ingredients, you put them in pans (if that is required). If the dough doesn't rise high enough, you probably should throw it out, or maybe do something else with it. There are things about gluten which doesn't equate with other recipes.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 21 (view)
 
Revolutionary auto technology
Posted: 2/2/2009 2:03:08 PM
It might be an interesting side-light on your wireless roadways. There are a few places in the world (typically involving a mountain) where trucks expend a lot of energy to get to the top, and then on the way down, they waste it all as heat (often brakes glowing red-hot). So, what happens if we put "linear generators" on the slopes? We give the vehicles who decide to equip themselves, with a means of trading the increasing kinetic energy they don't want to have, for electrical energy. As far as I know, this means placing magnets close to the road, but maybe we can soften this in the future.

Such a system allows vehicles to expend as much energy as they want to climbing the slope, but allows them to "donate" electricity to the local area instead of them wasting all of that energy in braking. At the present time, this kind of idea probably doesn't pay on every downhill section of road. But it probably does pay for routes which involve going over a mountain pass.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 20 (view)
 
Revolutionary auto technology
Posted: 2/2/2009 1:51:29 PM
Plastics, or carbon fibre, aren't bad. Neither is wood. There are still places where wood is an entirely useful material to consider in building something. I wouldn't blame number crunchers for things that are published: there are lots of really smart engineers and scientists crunching all kinds of numbers, and then some "idiot" like the head of accounting or GWB comes along, and says you can't publish those numbers.

Batteries are not as good as they could be, it would be nice to see better batteries. Avoiding moving parts is often a good thing. Recycleability of steel is good, the problem more often than not is somebody used steel in the first place. Salt isn't the only cause, it is one of many. Another big cause is training: nobody here knows how to work with XYZ, we'll use steel instead. An even bigger cause is too many engineers who haven't spent their life studying materials, are in the business of specifying materials.

The whole idea of "lowest cost" gets the job in the tender process causes problems, problems which are predictable. Hey, if you are the lowest bid on a bridge meant to carry most of the traffic across a river in a city which has more than 1 bridge, that doesn't mean a thing. Your bid assumes you use the poorest materials you can, and you build it with as little time to manage and access the construction as you can, and so society gets what it asked for, a cheap bridge.

I think that there should be some triggers in all levels of society, which invoke federal involvement, to produce much better than needed infrastructure. For example, let's say we are building a school along the Gulf Coast someplace. Building codes specify some minimum performance for the school. But, if a Category 5 hurricane moves into the region, are you really interested in minimums? Being a school, it is typical that it will be a place to congregate. Why shouldn't the federal government "intercept" such projects, and say that instead of building it to "this" low standard, we build it to this "high" standard? We'll pay for the upgrade. And so, whether it is schools, bridges, or anything else to do with infrastructure, we have a distribution of things that could be needed in an emergency, that are built far better than local needs could ever justify.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 19 (view)
 
Revolutionary auto technology
Posted: 2/2/2009 1:31:51 PM
I've always thought a turbine powered golf cart was the best application.

20k rpm is nothing, I think the first ceramic turbine turbocharger was turning over at 200k rpm. I know there are some micro
turbines over 1M (10^6) rpm.

The 1M microturbines were strange, but I will agree that making use of 20k rpm in a road vehicle is a challenge.

As far so-and-sos automatic transmission eating power goes, you also need to remember that there is typically more than 2:1 torque multiplication through a torque converter. It may be eating horsepower, it is making more torque. The most impressive example to me, are the twin-disc automatics in tractors and highway trucks. Easy to drive, easy to use, tons of torque, and fewer shocks on the drive train. Fewer broken parts.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 18 (view)
 
Revolutionary auto technology
Posted: 2/2/2009 1:24:02 PM
Sorry, been AWOL a while. I'll try to consolidate things as much as I can.

Electrical energy can be stored in many ways. Running a battery charger on a battery changes electrical energy into chemical energy. Using electrical energy to spin a flywheel is another way to store electrical energy (flywheel is typically HUGE, and in a vacuum). Another possibility is injecting charge into a ring superconductor. Low tech? How about pumping water uphill into a reservoir?

High temperature materials: the technical ceramics have it all over any tool steels or superalloys. Silicon nitride and silicon carbide and all their related materials will take temperatures much higher than any metallic system that is practical. The problems back in the 80's related to toughness. Surely 30 years of research into toughness of technical ceramics has got to have them close to values needed for widespread use?

There are ways of generating "free" electricity. Space based power is one. You put up lots of solar cells, and beam the power to Earth as "low density" microwaves. No, you don't try to track producer and collector. You put thin film antenna on buildings, and generate the power from them. It seems a house can't collect enough power under reasonable situations to power itself, but most neighbourhoods have a "large" store which doesn't need much power, it can distribute its excess power to the community to make up the deficit.

The real way to make lots of fusion power work, is with He-3. Which means finding a way to get He-3 trapped in lunar regolith back to Earth. Maybe by the time the transport problem is figured out, the physics of using He-3 will be known well enough to use it as a fuel.

On to the next set of articles.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 31 (view)
 
Autism Treatments GF/CF Diet
Posted: 1/30/2009 5:31:19 PM
I do not approach any question lightly. It would be best if you present facts to argue a position, instead of presenting supposition and ridicule.

From wikipedia:
Gluten is a composite of the proteins gliadin and glutenin. These exist, conjoined with starch, in the endosperms of some grass-related grains, notably wheat, rye, and barley. Gliadin and glutenin comprise about 80% of the protein contained in wheat seed. Being insoluble in water, they can be purified by washing away the associated starch. Worldwide, gluten is an important source of nutritional protein, both in foods prepared directly from sources containing it, and as an additive to foods otherwise low in protein.

The object of working these two proteins together, is for a network from which we can support the development of gas bubbles in a dough. I do not know if both gliadin and glutenin possess the peptide that aggravates celiac disease. If one looks at the definitions of the gums that are being used as replacements for gluten, they are called fibre. In "normal" bread, we are somehow forming a network of support using 2 different materials. It is easy to show that both insufficent "work" of the dough produces a bad product, as does overworking the dough. The use of the term "proper development of gluten" is entirely warranted in the case of conventional breads.

If we move to some other means of developing a network of support for air (actually CO2) bubbles in bread, such as guar or xanthum gum, we probably remove the need for "development", but in any event we change it a lot. In any event, we need an elastic structure throughout the bread, which will contain gas bubbles. If bubbles break prematurely, we end up with large bubbles which should have never happened, and we may end up with smaller than expected bubbles from the fragments. As viewed from this point of view, it doesn't matter whether we are talking about the protein pair normally found in wheat, or some "gum", we want a relatively uniform distribution of some elastic substance in the dough, so that we end up with a reasonably uniform distribution of bubbles.

Xanthum and guar gums happen to be food fibres. There may be other replacements for gluten which have a different structure. No doubt, if they are different, their best use will be different. I have no doubt that using either xanthum or guar in "gluten-free" flours is different that standard practice with flours that do contain gliadin and glutenin.

In terms of the baking of the dough, some of the baking conditions will involve the development of the disulfide bridges in the gluten network. With replacements for the gluten in flour, it is entirely possible that baking conditions will need to be adjusted. Since most people don't like to experiment, I would expect that commercial flours that are "gluten-free" will be adjusted so that cooking times and temperatures are as similar to ordinary flour as can be. This does not mean that this is the best set of time, temperature, humidity, etc. to produce the best product. The object in commerce is to produce the most convenience, which means the fewest changes in this regard.

This is getting entirely too academic for most people to follow Captain Girly Girl. If you wish to argue this further, I suggest you contact me directly and we can have an academic argument about this, complete with references. Upon conclusion, we can post a consensus statement.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 29 (view)
 
Autism Treatments GF/CF Diet
Posted: 1/30/2009 2:14:28 PM
Mankind is not homogeneous: we are not all the same. Which is great, life would be boring if we were all the same.

Things like gluten free diets come up in different contexts. For those with Celiac disease, the science to understand the connection between gluten and their problem seems to be there. They seem to have narrowed it down to a specific peptide (component of a protein). Which is wonderful, it gives a person a place to work from. At other times, people grasping at straws decide to try things, and find they work. And they tell other people, and the "diet" takes on a life of its own, without any science to understand what it is doing, and how. From what I have read about any autism/gluten connection, it still seems to fall into the later situation: no science.

That notwithstanding, and you feel a need to experiment with gluten free cooking, maybe this helps. It is oriented towards pizza, since that seemed to be important.

It is my understanding from a cooking point of view, that gluten is a combination of two different proteins, which when brought into intimate contact (the kneeding), produce an elastic structure in the product in which the gluten is "developed". Note: this definition is at odds with the problems that people with Celiac disease have: we are not altering the chemistry of "bread" by kneeding it. The people with Celiac disease have a problem with a particular component that is in one (both?) proteins which can be "developed" into gluten. From what little reading I have done, it seems that a specific kind of disulphide bridge is the problem.

If a person goes to make a loaf of bread, it is possible to make it in such a way that things are completely mixed, but very little "working" of the dough is done. No gluten has been "developed". If you bake the dough, it is my understanding that the crust will be undeveloped (wimpy, easily broken) and probably flat (no well developed air pockets). If air pockets within the baked product are present, they probably are of a much larger range in size (radius) than you would expect: from huge to very tiny. Well made bread develops a crust and has more or less uniform distribution of air pocket sizes. The pockets are formed from yeast evolving CO2 while "digesting" sugar. Which is why bread needs yeast and sugar.

Consequently, if we go to make anything which is vaguely bread-like, we are looking for this somewhat uniform development of air pockets. It may have yeast, or it may rely on chemical means (baking powder or baking soda) of generating CO2. Neither the yeast, baking powder, baking soda, or other gas generators, has anything to do with the gluten. They are just a means of generating CO2 gas inside the dough. The chemical reactions tend to all happen all at one time, which means if you overwork the dough, all the gas escapes. With yeast, it is a living cell which makes the CO2, and it does so as long as it is fed (sugar is available).

Apparently, it seems xanthum gum or guar gum are among the two more well known components which can replace this "elastic membrane" effect in bread that gluten provides. Sorry, I have no idea if xanthaum or guar contain the peptide which causes problems for Celiac disease. I would guess that the various "gluten free" flours that you can buy, are made from "low gluten" flours but have xanthum, guar or some other kind of "gum" added to them. One particular flour I've run across uses guar gum.

Guar gum comes from the guar bean. Xanthum (Xanthan) comes from a bacteria. It would seem that if you are interested in a more natural product, guar is the one to look for. Locust bean produces something similar to the guar bean.

The following is not expected to be extensive or definitive, just to provide ideas:
http://www.jamieoliver.com/bloggers/viewtopic.php?id=33720
http://www.glutenfreecookingschool.com/archives/gluten-free-pizza/
Maybe some ideas from:
https://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/archive/index.php/t-438196.html
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 6 (view)
 
Revolutionary auto technology
Posted: 1/29/2009 9:32:22 AM
As far as removing the dent goes, it depends how fussy you are. If you watch Chip Foose on TV, those guys go to great pains to make the car perfect. Whether that is cheaper than repairing a glass or CF piece, I don't know.

If you are talking exhaust on gasoline/diesel/... type engines, it is really hard to beat titanium. One set of pipes for the life of the vehicle. Corvette brought that out when? And still everyone else is using cheap steel and replacing the exhaust every N years.

I'm still waiting (since 1983) for gas turbines with significant parts of the hot path made out of technical ceramics. The ceramics now are way better than what was around in 1983, and they are getting used in places. The first gas turbine like use commercially, I think was the hot side turbine of a turbocharger. Probably 20 years ago.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 4 (view)
 
Revolutionary auto technology
Posted: 1/29/2009 6:48:13 AM
Sure, you can bring materials costs into things, but you need to set a bunch of other considerations up as well. If you want to run the vehicle until the first problem arises, and then throw away the entire car and not recycle anything, that imposes a cost structure on every part for that car. If you have one well made part which can be recycled indefinitely, its cost can be recovered over the many vehicles it goes into, not just the one. But today's society is entirely too used to going to Fred's Steel Supply and using whatever happens to be the cheapest steel they have. When they find that whatever they build is rusted to pieces after a single winter (with all the salt used on the roads) for those of us who live with snow, or perhaps a single year living next to the ocean, then they will complain about the poor materials used for the vehicles. There are entirely too many situations these days where things that are made to be disposable (wrappers on hamburgers, ...) last longer in a garbage dump than engineered products do. We can make the better materials, and with the right incentive, people will use them. Someone else needs to find the way to have this make sense economically. If that means designing vehicles so that they are easier to recycle, then do that.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 20 (view)
 
Repetitive Food
Posted: 1/28/2009 9:02:49 AM
How's this:

Desperately healthy pancakes
http://recipes.wikia.com/wiki/Desperately_healthy_pancakes

If you wanted to increase the protein, I think you could partially substitute more powdered milk for the plain yogurt. Also, as it has 3 different kinds of flour in it (including whole wheat), you could even do substitutions for other flours. In fact, there are all kinds of substitutions open with that recipe.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 19 (view)
 
Repetitive Food
Posted: 1/28/2009 5:27:41 AM
The one link was about adding TVP (Textured Vegetable Protein) to pancakes. That is probably a generic solution, but is a little "chunky". I think another generic approach is to see how adding skim milk powder works for recipes. You might need to be careful about what skim milk powder you use, according to Wikipedia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powdered_milk
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 2 (view)
 
The epidemic continues
Posted: 1/27/2009 6:21:28 PM
Part of the problem of being obese is the attitudes of others.

How do you tell if some is fit? Well you look to see if their stomach is big. It seems unlikely I will ever get away from the stomach being "too big" appearance, I continue to try. I bench more than 20% over my body weight, and do more than 4 times body weight on leg press. You see me on the treadmill? I'm the guy going at maximum slope for an hour or more. Sorry, most people have misguided ideas as to what being fit means.

There are some people who are predisposed to being very efficient at handling Calories. The best example I've seen is a tribe of aboriginals that exist on both sides of the USA/Mexico border. The Mexican side has the people subsisting on diets which would make most people look like concentration camp refugees. They look "normal". On the USA side, they get more food, and everyone looks like the Goodyear blimp.

Eating good food in proper amounts is a good place to start. But there are other reasons for why some people are excessively thin or excessively big. Fixing the availability of junk food is a place to start, but it is not all that is needed.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 15 (view)
 
Repetitive Food
Posted: 1/27/2009 7:16:47 AM
I'm not sure who you were asking about recipes, but ....

If one looks at pancakes abstractly, it is easier to incorporate protein into any recipe. One example is to use some amount of chickpea flour. For those who use chickpea flour, falafel is a food which is made from chick pea flour. Hence, you should be able to experiment by blending falafel recipes with pancake recipes. Another word which may help in locating recipes, is savory. There seems to be an abundance of savory pancake recipes. At some point you may run across latke's, and again savory and latke is a ripe field for finding your higher protein pancakes.

In terms of whole wheat flour, you are probably going to have to use finer grinds of whole wheat flour to get what you want in a wheat pancake. By definition, whole wheat will be higher in protein.

Healthy Pancakes
http://www.mrbreakfast.com/subcategory.asp?categoryid=4&subcategoryid=4

So You Think You Hate Vegetables: Savory Pancakes
http://www.dailyspark.com/blog.asp?post=so_you_think_you_hate_vegetables_savory_pancakes

Indian Savory Pancake Recipe
http://www.worldfamousrecipes.org/2007/05/20/pancake-recipes-indian-savory-pancake-recipe/

Savory Tvp And Greens Latkes (3/4 down page)
http://www.proteinpower.com/forum/showthread.php?t=22

O-konomi-yaki Japanese Veggie Pancake Recipe
http://www.grouprecipes.com/19225/o-konomi-yaki-japanese-veggie-pancake.html
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 8 (view)
 
Electromagnetic fields and adverse affect on health.
Posted: 1/26/2009 7:22:01 AM
Yes, I have a passing familiarity with health physics, having worked at a research nuclear reactor for a while.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 6 (view)
 
Electromagnetic fields and adverse affect on health.
Posted: 1/24/2009 10:05:09 AM
There are lots of people who have a stake in this question, and who have a motive to promote an answer that may be at odds with evidence. In many of the studies about how living things interact with the electromagnetic fields that are so common in society, the effects are about the same size as statistical noise. One place to start any research, is wikipedia. It isn't peer reviewed, it does present some references.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electromagnetic_radiation_and_health#Health_effects_of_electric_power_transmission

Another reference I looked up via
"health physics" high voltage transmission
as a search topic at Google is:
RESIDENTIAL MAGNETIC FIELDS, CONTACT VOLTAGE AND THEIR RELATIONSHIP: THE EFFECTS OF DISTRIBUTION UNBALANCE AND RESIDENTIAL PROXIMITY TO A TRANSMISSION LINE
http://www.health-physics.com/pt/re/healthphys/abstract.00004032-200612000-00011.htm;jsessionid=J7Wc1pkyJhX8DM0C5dfGJ5bGxDQ2JchQvsZ9ys6HQnL1dK9y2Vn4!97158217!181195629!8091!-1

The journal is titled, "Health Physics: The Radiation Safety Journal". If you have a good medical library nearby, especially if their are hospitals practising nuclear medicine, this journal is likely in their library.

But, the field in general for your topic is Health Physics.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 14 (view)
 
Strep throat
Posted: 1/24/2009 9:02:34 AM
If a doctor prescribes antibiotics for any condition, not just strep throat, the size of the prescription is taken into account, and you should take ALL of the medication on schedule until the prescription is finished. People quitting antibiotic schemes early are a big part of the reason we now have so many antibiotic resistant bacteria around. If you reach the end of the prescription and the infection seems to be still around, you want to see a doctor soon, as they might need to give you a different antibiotic or something. If the infection starts to get worse, you need to see a doctor soon. If you start to develop other symptoms not related to what they believe the problem is, if may be a reaction to the antibiotic, and you need to talk to your doctor soon.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 2 (view)
 
Skipping for cardio
Posted: 1/20/2009 10:39:39 AM
Congratulations on what you have done so far.

My initial inclination, is to treat it just the same as any other form of cardio. For people that are anywhere near average in fitness, getting to 20 minutes is something to aim for. You are past that. Unless you have specific endurance goals in mind (like marathons), going beyond 45 minutes tends not to produce that much more benefit. You say you enjoy what you are doing, which is important. You are getting a rest day or two. Everything looks fine. But, perhaps someone involved in boxing will come along and comment?

The only thing which comes to mind that might be negative, is that skipping probably has a larger amount of impact than most other forms of aerobic exercise. Larger, in terms of more "pulses" per unit time. I don't think the magnitude of the impact is as large as a heel strike in running.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 4 (view)
 
Shin Splints Help
Posted: 1/19/2009 6:42:16 AM
There seems to be more than one thing which causes pain in the shins. Hence, you will always get a variety of suggestions.

It can be something like the muscles in your calves need stretching, which requires two stretches. In both instances your foot is on the floor and your knee is pushed forward, producing an angle less than 90 degrees at the ankle. In one stretch, your knee is nearly straight, and in the other stretch your knee is bent. In bending the knee, you are slacking off the gastroc muscle, which allows soleus to stretch more.

Another thing you can do, is to try and strengthen the muscle in the front of the shin. If you have smooth floors, one thing you can do is to lay a towel on the floor, and scrunch the towel up with your toes. If you have access to a seated calf raise machine, you can put your heel on the front edge of the support, and then lift the weight by raising your toes up. Normally you put the ball of your foot on the rear edge, and then raise your heel to lift the weight. You will not be able to lift as much weight with that little muscle in your shin, as the big muscles in your calf can lift. Another approach is through walking. Walk uphill on a treadmill just until the point where you are starting to notice discomfort. Then wait a couple of days before you do the same thing again. Eventually, you will build up the muscle in the shins. Of course, if you still want to get exercise (cardio) beyond what you are doing walking uphill, you need to pick some kind of exercise which doesn't work that muscle in your shins. Bicycling might work, swimming should work. In all of these exercises, it is the act of lifting your toes up that is working that muscle. You just want to get the attention of the muscle, and then let it recover for 48 hours (or so). If you don't see any improvement after a couple or 3 weeks, seek out medical attention. It might be something else causing the pain.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 2 (view)
 
Beginner @ the Gym
Posted: 1/18/2009 5:33:29 PM
Variety is a good thing. Finding things you enjoy doing is at least as important. If someone suggests an exercise which you end up hating, you won't do it.

One thing I read a while ago, suggested women aim for 300 Calorie workouts and 1000 Calories per week. Well, if you are doing five, 200 Calories workouts per week, you are hitting the 1000 Calories per week. If you start to see a slow weight loss, then you know you are doing okay on that count.

Whether you are using a treadmill or an elliptical, you are pretty much using the 3 biggest muscles in your body (gluteus maximus, quadriceps, hamstrings). Yes, some other muscles are involved, but those 3 are probably doing most of the work.

What most women call toning, means an endurance exercise. If the exercise you are doing takes a long time compared to 30 seconds, it is an endurance exercise for the muscle tissue (not necessarily for the heart, lungs and cardiovascular system). So, doing treadmill and elliptical is good for the muscles being used, but neither exercise tries to use all the muscles in the body. If you are wanting to "tone" those other muscles, you might be looking at doing weights. Going fast with weights is what the professional athletes do, for everybody else going slow is better. Something like 4 seconds per repetition isn't too bad. If a set of some exercise takes longer than 30 seconds, you are most likely toning in some respect. A set of 15 repetitions should take about 1 minute. In order to get the most benefit out of it, the weight should be heavy enough that you cannot do appreciably more than 15 repetitions. If you decide you want to work through a 15-18 repetition set, when you get to the point that 18 repetitions becomes doable, you want to move up in weight so that 15 repetitions is a struggle.

Don't worry too much about "bulking up". While some women will bulk up due to genetics, most women doing endurance oriented exercises will not bulk up to any extent.

But it looks like you have made a good start. Best of luck.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 25 (view)
 
Great health solution
Posted: 1/18/2009 1:54:35 PM
I have no problem with people looking for cheaper solutions. After all, if this wasn't necessary, the generic drug industry would not exist. This last year I decided to start investigating what vinegar was good for in the yard. And if I remember correctly, it is surprisingly good at killing dandelion.

I don't think DMSO is a terribly good example of something people should be using. Impure DMSO can cause no end of problems. Or worse yet, DMSO that has been tainted.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 11 (view)
 
Exercising While Nursing An Injury
Posted: 1/17/2009 9:24:22 AM
It sort of sounds like your PT was assuming you would be wearing the splint/brace all the time. And sure, if you immobilize your should all day long, having it freeze in that position is probably possible. I was only suggesting to use it for exercise. The extra support it would give, would stop the bouncing which is the pain would be coming from. But by all means follow their advice, that is what you are paying them for, if nothing else. Good look with your disc problems as well.

As far as old medical problems goes, I once went in for a massage by a guy who teaches massage at a local college. He is used to working on bodybuilders, I am not sure how many soccer players he has seen. He have me a form to fill in, which had about 1/4 page for previous injuries. I filled it, and wrote about as much again on the back of the page. :-) But he just about killed his hands in working on my legs. I suspect our muscles get tied up from getting kicked so much.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 9 (view)
 
Exercising While Nursing An Injury
Posted: 1/16/2009 1:57:40 PM
Here is an example of the sort of brace I was thinking of.
http://www.yortho.com/shoulder_brace.html
At $200, it isn't cheap.
 fortran
Joined: 2/21/2004
Msg: 7 (view)
 
Repetitive Food
Posted: 1/16/2009 1:48:17 PM
Yesterday, day before? Anyway, the Food TV network in Canada, one if Michael Smith's shows, put a bunch of apples and onions and garlic cloves and some apple cider is a pan. Put chicken on top of vegetables, cover and cook. Chicken also goes very well with chocolate. I like to take boneless, skinless chicken thighs, and put about half a Hershey's Kiss of chocolate on the inside, pin it with a toothpick. Then bread or whatever you want the outside, and cook normally. Some chocolate will of course leak out, but there will still be chocolate inside.
 
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