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 Author Thread: Duck anyone?
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 15 (view)
 
Duck anyone?
Posted: 12/21/2008 8:06:46 AM
Since it is already sliced, and there is probably no skin or fat, you'll need to be careful with wild duck to make sure it does not get tough and stringy.

I'm making duck for our Christmas potluck. Here's what I'll do:

Cut the meat into bit sized chunks. Season with salt, pepper, paprika, and dried rosemary (grind it into a powder first).

Brown in bacon fat (but do not cook through). Drain on paper towels.

In a sauce pan I make a glaze from apple cider, butter, and bourbon (maybe a little brown sugar and some spices - taste as you go). I'd share the proportions, but I make it up as I go along. . .

Then the meat and glaze go into a crock pot for a few hours to finish. This will make the meat tender and tasty - even people who do not usually like game will enjoy this dish.

Cheers!
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 2 (view)
 
Pavlova
Posted: 8/4/2008 3:40:54 PM
When I make Pavlova (or any baked meringue) I find that a low temp (like 250 F) for a long time yields the best result.

My recipe calls for a preheated oven at 250 for 1 hour - then turn off the oven and let it come to room temp (I leave mine overnight). It is important not to open the oven at all until it has cooled.

Hope this helps!
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 19 (view)
 
Light Desserts for Spring and Summer
Posted: 4/16/2008 1:10:07 PM
Zabaglione - perfect light dessert for summer

Ingredients

4 egg yolks
3 tbsp honey
Grated zest of one lemon
Scant pinch of salt
1/2 cup sweet wine - I like a good tawny Port, though marsala is more traditional, any sweet wine will work. . .

Place a large, round bottom, heatproof bowl over a pot of gently simmering water - the bottom of the bowl should not touch the water.

Place egg yolks, zest, salt, and honey in the bowl and mix until pale and thick.

Add the wine a few drops at a time while whisking vigorously

Continue whisking until the mixture increases dramatically in volume and becomes thick and foamy.

This will take at least ten minutes, but it can easily take up to half an hour to get it perfect.

(practice makes perfect)

Chill in the fridge for at least 30 minutes then spoon over fresh berries (I like to sprinkle Grand Marnier over the berries first). Garnish with fresh mint.
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 60 (view)
 
Rhubarb, love it or hate it?
Posted: 2/28/2008 9:37:38 AM
Rhubarb Barm Brack served with Gran Marnier whipped cream - a summer favorite at my place:

3/4 cup light brown sugar
2 cups currants
zest of 1 lemon
2 1/2 cups strong brewed tea, cooled, strained

Macerate above together for at least 6 hours (I start this in the morning before I leave for the day so it is ready when I came home for dinner)

Then preheat oven to 350.

1 egg
4 tablespoons softened butter
2 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
1 tsp baking soda

Add one beaten egg and 4 tablespoons softened butter. Combine well.

Add 2 1/2 cups whole wheat flour and 1 tsp baking soda. Combine well.

Pour into greased and floured loaf pan. Bake until done 30-60 minutes (golden on top, firm).

Sauce:

2 lbs rhubarb
2 tablespoons sugar
dusting of cinnamon
dusting of nutmeg
zest of one lemon
juice of 1/2 lemon
3/4 cup water

Cut 2 lbs rhubarb into 1 inch pieces. Add 2 tablespoons sugar, dusting of cinnamon, dusting of nutmeg, zest of one lemon, juice of 1/2 lemon, 3/4 cup water. Simmer until thick sauce forms (don't cook too long - you want there to be some chunks).

Spoon rhubarb sauce over sliced barm brack. Serve with whipped cream.

Yummy warm - it is good chilled too.

Add a little Gran Marnier to the whipped cream for flavor. . . I pour a bit of rum over the hot barm brack when it comes out of the oven. And dust the entire dessert with powdered sugar and cinnamon. And nutmeg. And add a mint sprig. . . It will be beautiful.
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 7 (view)
 
gals that don't cook,guys that do
Posted: 12/2/2007 8:54:52 AM
I love to cook. A girl I was seeing was a decent cook, but she didn't enjoy it in the same way I do - she cooks to eat - I actually enjoy the process.

So I cooked part of the time - she cooked when she had a taste for something specific - but mostly we tried to spend time in the kitchen together - and let's face it, with busy schedules, that's sometimes the only time we had together. . .

Cooking is like any other household chore - I don't see any reason to assign a gender to it. I can sew and do my own laundry too. . . :)
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 6 (view)
 
Turnip vs. Parsnip??
Posted: 10/24/2007 12:43:51 PM
My favorite way to do parsnips:

Use a vegetable peeler to clean your parsnips just like a carrot.

Slice them longways into "fries". Raw they are very hard - I use a good, sharp chef's knife on a wooden cutting board.

Sauté them gently in a little melted butter with a sprinkling of sugar until they are soft and start to caramelize. The key is to cook them very slowly, giving them time to cook through and soften up before the outside browns.

These are a perfect side dish - and a nice change from the "usual" veggies. . .
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 1 (view)
 
Irving Berlin?
Posted: 8/28/2007 9:07:35 PM
I don't know why - I haven't heard it in ages - but on my way home from the theatre tonight, I had Irving Berlin's "What'll I Do?" stuck in my head.

It won't go away.

Listen to Barbara Cook sing it on that tube site; nobody alive does it better.

What'll I do when you
Are far away,
And I am blue,
What'll I do?

What'll I do when I
Am wondering who
Is kissing you,
What'll I do?

What'll I do with just
A photograph,
To tell my troubles to?

When I'm alone
With all the dreams of you,
That won't come true,
What'll I do?

Anybody else get these old songs in their head for no obvious reason? Before this, it was "Blue Skies". . .
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 7 (view)
 
Chocolate Cake Recipes?
Posted: 7/26/2007 1:07:50 PM
I get many requests for this cake, and it can be tailored to suit any pallet. I can't imagine an easier recipe - this is in just about every cookbook I own, but it is just so darn good - I make only a few very small changes, but it makes a world of difference!

2 cups sugar
1-3/4 cups all-purpose flour
3/4 cup good, dutch cocoa
1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1-1/2 teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
2 eggs
1 cup whole milk
1/2 cup vegetable oil
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
3/4 cup boiling water
1/2 cup liqueur of your choice


Heat oven to 350�F. Grease and flour two 9-inch round baking pans. Put the kettle on to boil - you'll need hot water in a few minutes.

Stir together sugar, flour, cocoa, baking powder, baking soda and salt in large bowl. Add eggs, milk, oil and vanilla; beat by hand with whisk until combined. Add booze.

Before you add the boiling water, make sure your pans are ready and the oven is hot - as soon as you add the water and get it stirred in (the batter will be very thin - it will be OK, I promise) - pour batter into prepared pans and get them into the oven. The hot water kicks starts the reactions that cause the cake to rise - mess around here and you will end up with flat (but tasty) cakes!

Bake 30 to 35 minutes until done. Cool completely before frosting.

Right before you frost the cake, sprinkle both layers with more of your favorite liqueur. I suppose you could use a pastry brush and paint it on, but I am not that dainty - I stick my thumb over the mouth of the bottle and sprinkle away. . .


Frost with Uber-Special Truffle Booze Frosting:

(Here again, another old standard, but with a twist)

1-1/4 cups whipping cream
1/4 cup light-colored corn syrup
1 12-ounce package (2 cups) chocolate chips
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup liqueur of your choice

Put your chocolate chips in a heat resistant mixing bowl and place on the stove where it will be slowly warmed while you are mixing up the cake.

In a medium heavy saucepan bring whipping cream, booze, vanilla, salt and corn syrup to a simmer

Pour over chocolate chips; let stand for 2 minutes.

Whisk mixture until smooth and melted.

Cover and chill about 1-1/2 hours.

Beat with an electric mixer until fluffy.

Frost the cake.


I have had really good luck with Chambord (raspberry-chocolate is my favorite combination), Kahlua, coffee liqueur, creme de menthe, chocolate liqueur. . . even bourbon isn't bad.

For dark chocolate people, you can use a dark cocoa in the cake and a chocolate liqueur with dark, bitter chocolate chips - it's wonderful!

You can use milk chocolate chips too, just reduce the amount of cream or the frosting never really stiffens up (but it's still tasty - you can just sort of pour it over the cake. . .).
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 29 (view)
 
Eggs, Any special recipe's ?
Posted: 7/23/2007 3:08:52 PM
^^^^^^^^
Sweetntarty - basically, yep. Around Ranchero-keith, "garbage" frittatas are a weekend breakfast staple - just about anything can (and does) go in. . .
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 17 (view)
 
Eggs, Any special recipe's ?
Posted: 7/16/2007 7:15:57 PM
Has anyone suggested a frittata yet?

This is a great way to clean out the fridge on a Sunday morning. . .

I use a small cast iron skillet for this (so it can go right from the stove top into the oven).

Sweat some onion and garlic (and anything else you like - diced asparagus is one of my favorites).

You can do meat, or leave it out - just brown small bits of ham or bacon - prosciutto is good (and doesn't need to be browned, just chopped fine and warmed through).

Break enough eggs to fill the pan you are using into a mixing bowl and whisk together with seasoning (I use salt, pepper, and paprika) and a few drops of milk. I usually add some fresh herbs and cheese to this as well - a chiffenade of basil and mint and some goat cheese works well.

When the meat/veggies are nearly done, pour the eggs into the pan and put the whole thing in the oven on 350 until it has puffed up and is starting to brown.

Throw some shredded cheese on top and put in the broiler until bubbly. Good stuff.

My spell check doesn't like chiffinade, frittata, or prociutto. How sad if we had to go through life with just chopped ham omelettes. . .
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 14 (view)
 
I need a good pork tenderloin recipe/dish
Posted: 7/10/2007 8:13:24 PM
One of my favorite ways to do a pork loin roast:

Pork Loin Pinwheels stuffed with fresh herbs.

Preheat oven to 400.

Butterfly one large pork loin roast and pound to a square with even thickness (about 1/4 inch). Season both sides with salt, pepper, and paprika to taste.

In a mortar and pestle, smash several cloves of garlic. Add to this the zest of one lemon, a few mint leaves and a handful of rosemary leaves. Pound. Add a cup of flat-leaf parsley. Pound to a nice paste. Spread this mixture evenly across the pork loin. Roll the loin to form a log and tie with butcher's twine. Roast in the oven until the internal temp is 160 degrees (a cast iron pan works best).

This will take 30-60 minutes depending on the size of your roast.

Remove from oven and allow to rest under foil for 10-15 minutes before "carving".

Optional: You can add goat cheese to the herb mixture. It is yummy that way too.

Serve with red potatoes roasted in olive oil and herbs du Provence.

I enjoy a Sangiovese with the pork, like Banfi's CollePino (a merlot/sangiovese blend). Great and inexpensive!

Save an end-piece for me. . .
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 19 (view)
 
Cakes and other odities on the grill
Posted: 6/20/2007 8:51:48 PM
Eddie: Everything in moderation (including moderation?). . .

Roxannne: I would shoot for an unglazed industrial tile or natural stone tile. . .
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 15 (view)
 
Cakes and other odities on the grill
Posted: 6/20/2007 9:36:37 AM
I suppose you could keep a seperate one for the grill, but after a while (and I use mine all the time - it helps even out the hot spots in my ancient oven) it sort of turns dark anyway, so I just have one that I use for everything. . .
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 9 (view)
 
Cakes and other odities on the grill
Posted: 6/19/2007 9:25:10 PM
Baking stone:
http://www.cooking.com/products/shprodde.asp?SKU=102521

Mine is round and fits on my charcoal grill. It helps to even out the heat so there are no hot spots. Just "preheat" it on the grill with the lid closed before you add your cake.

You should be able to find them anywhere. I got mine at Meijer.
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 5 (view)
 
Cakes and other odities on the grill
Posted: 6/19/2007 2:14:02 PM
I have a baking stone that fits on my grill with plenty room all around the edge - it makes a great platform for baking a cake (and helps to keep the bottom from scorching).

I also have an electronic thermometer that I use to help adjust the temp on my charcoal grill.

It's important to get the temp right before you put your cake on and then leave the lid on as much as possible (not much different than an oven, really).

I have done cakes, pizza, bicuits, all kinds of things this way.
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 9 (view)
 
French Onion Soup
Posted: 6/19/2007 10:11:10 AM
Lots of good suggestions. . .

Here's mine:

I use a bottle of good, dark beer in the soup (in addition to good beef stock).

Melt a little stilton cheese into the soup while it is simmering away, and make sure to use plenty of thyme in a bouquet garnier.

Simmer a LONG time to concentrate the flavor.

For the crouton, make good garlic bread. My favorite cheese for the top is a good smokey provelone.

I think I need to make soup tonight. . .
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 2 (view)
 
Rhubarb Barm Brack
Posted: 5/13/2007 3:05:46 PM
The eggs, butter, flour, and soda are added to the currant mixture.

Cheers!
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 1 (view)
 
Rhubarb Barm Brack
Posted: 5/13/2007 8:54:37 AM
My rhubarb is up! I have a friend that LOVES anything with rhubarb in it. She is part of a group that is coming next weekend for a dinner party. So, in preparation for guests next weekend (and because I have not made it in a long time) I made rhubarb barm brack tonight. It's pretty good.

And because it is not humanly possible for me follow a recipe without making my own "improvements", here's my version:

3/4 cup light brown sugar
2 cups currants
zest of 1 lemon
2 1/2 cups strong brewed tea, cooled, strained

Macerate above together for at least 6 hours (I started this in the morning before I left for the day so it was ready when I came home for dinner)

Then preheat oven to 350.

1 egg
4 tablespoons softened butter
2 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
1 tsp baking soda

Add one beaten egg and 4 tablespoons softened butter. Combine well.

Add 2 1/2 cups whole wheat flour and 1 tsp baking soda. Combine well.

Pour into greased and floured loaf pan. Bake until done 30-60 minutes (golden on top, firm).

Sauce:

2 lbs rhubarb
2 tablespoons sugar
dusting of cinnamon
dusting of nutmeg
zest of one lemon
juice of 1/2 lemon
3/4 cup water

Cut 2 lbs rhubarb into 1 inch pieces. Add 2 tablespoons sugar, dusting of cinnamon, dusting of nutmeg, zest of one lemon, juice of 1/2 lemon, 3/4 cup water. Simmer until thick sauce forms (don't cook too long - you want there to be some chunks).

Spoon rhubarb sauce over sliced barm brack. Serve with whipped cream.

Yummy warm - it is good chilled too.
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 6 (view)
 
Dealing with wine snobs...Help.
Posted: 4/18/2007 8:41:35 PM
I agree with #5 - you need to find out what food will be served - it will help guide your wine selection.

If your local store is not helpful, you may want to see if there is another wine shop within a reasonable distance. A good wine-guy (or gal) can make all the difference in the world when you are in unfamilier territory. My favorite shop is more than 30 minutes away, but the selection, prices, and helpful staff make it worth the trip.

If you have contact with the people you will be buying for, find out what they like. Every "wine snob" is different. (Buying to please me would be different from buying to please my sister-in-law. . .)

Cheers!
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 3 (view)
 
Whining about wine
Posted: 4/17/2007 6:00:11 PM
I am indeed a wine snob - but not French in particular!

I am all about some West coast Zins, but I have not found a West coast Gewurtz that I like as much as an Alsatian. Give me a Trimbach or GRAND CRU ALTENBERG (I only have two bottles of the '97 left!).

Chateau Ste. Michelle has a great late harvest riesling that I would put up against anything German. Nobody does Moscato like the Italians. . .

Different regions for different grapes!
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 1 (view)
 
Whining about wine
Posted: 4/17/2007 8:11:25 AM
All day long yesterday I was anxiously awaiting the opening of a bottle of South African Gewurtztraminer - recommended by someone with taste similar to mine. I love gewurtz, but so far I only love Alsatian Gewurtz - I was looking forward to trying the South African version.

I hurried home after my meeting, pulled the bottle from the chiller and lovingly popped the cork.

My Gewurztraminer smelled like wet cardboard - TCA taint! It was undrinkable - I was despondent; I shed a tear as I poured it down the sink. My anticipation for this particular bottle was so great that I couldn't bring myself to open anything else, so I went without.

It is the second time recently that I cried over spilled wine - I dropped a bottle of decent pinot noir in the driveway on Saturday while carrying groceries. It smelled heavenly. . .

My question is this: How often do you get a tainted or "corked" bottle? This is only my second that I can easily recall - some others may have been boarderline - this was totaly undrinkable. . .
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 1 (view)
 
The new catalog is here!
Posted: 4/13/2007 3:08:06 PM
Do sites like this provide us with too many dating options?

Read here:
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/10/science/10tier.html

To sum up: Studies suggest that giving people too many options allows them to be far more discerning - always looking for that perfect match, and always refining what "perfect" means to them. Presented with few options, they are more apt to "settle".

Do we treat dating sites like a Sears catalog? Searching for the perfect item with all the right features - nothing less will do?

"She's ok - good education, compatible morals, nice teeth - but I really wanted red hair. . ."

Are more options a bad thing? Does having more people choose from automatically make us harder to please?

Reactions, please.
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 5 (view)
 
More uses for culinary lavender
Posted: 4/13/2007 1:22:23 PM
Any lavender that has not been sprayed with pesticides is "culinary". Some varieties are stronger then others. A little goes a long way. . .
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 2 (view)
 
From friends too more...
Posted: 4/13/2007 12:20:21 PM
B,

Be careful not to read too much into what she is saying - she may have feelings for you, but she may just need the safty of an old friendship. Go slow, be there for her, and see what happens. . .
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 4 (view)
 
More uses for culinary lavender
Posted: 4/13/2007 12:01:41 PM
There is definity some truth to that - I think Americans think of lavender as a smell and not a taste, unlike in France where it is nearly ubiquitous. For me, the key to using lavender is to use it sparingly and include vanilla - the first few things I made tasted like hand soap, but the addition of vanilla makes all the difference in the world. . .
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 39 (view)
 
Self confidence and dating sites
Posted: 4/12/2007 7:51:30 PM
Merf,

I think the same "unhuman" qualities that allow people to post flaming responses on-line (which they would never say to a person's face) allow them to project an un-natural self confidence. It is easy to create the person you would like to be on-line, rather than be the boring old person you actually are. . .
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 35 (view)
 
Self confidence and dating sites
Posted: 4/12/2007 3:58:22 PM
The people here who state that their self esteem is unaffected by the responses they get here are either consistently getting positive responses or are made of sterner stuff than I.

No matter how well-adjusted a person may be, the old ego certainly takes a hit when facing rejection (or silence - a very loud rejection indeed).

A healthy person simply recovers and moves on to the next prospect - but there is always that moment of feeling disheartened. . .
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 1 (view)
 
More uses for culinary lavender
Posted: 4/10/2007 11:23:10 AM
When I ordered my lavender from Provence in January, the smallest amount I could get them to ship me was seven ounces. Seven ounces is an awful lot of dried flowers! I am now constantly on the lookout for new ways to enjoy my lavender stockpile.

Allow me to share. . .

Lavender tea:

This makes a whole pot of good tea.

2 tablespoons loose black tea (I prefer Darjeeling)
1 heaping teaspoon dried lavender flowers
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
3 tablespoons sugar

Steep in boiling water for at least 5 minutes. Add milk to taste.


Lavender Icing:

I made this to take to my Easter brunch. I used it to frost a plain old white cake - I thought it was wonderful.

3 cups powdered sugar
1 heaping teaspoon dried lavender flowers

2 tablespoons Chambord (raspberry liqueur)
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 tablespoon milk

Stir together wet ingredients.

Grind the lavender to a powder in a mortar and pestle and put it through a screen to get out any pieces of stem. Stir into liquid and allow to steep for 15 minutes.

Add liquid to powdered sugar and stir to combine. The amounts are rough and will need to be adjusted. Add more liqueur if too dry - more sugar if too wet. Keep this from setting by placing in a heat-proof bowl in a hot water bath.

Pour over a chilled cake for a pretty cascade effect (I poured it over each layer separately, then stacked them), or use to frost cookies.

The Chambord gives the finished icing a nice, lavender hue.
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 8 (view)
 
Baking with Kahlua
Posted: 4/3/2007 1:47:33 PM
I just posted a cake recipe that is very tasty when made with kalua:

http://forums.plentyoffish.com/datingPosts6993510.aspx
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 1 (view)
 
Drunken Chocolate Cake
Posted: 4/3/2007 1:46:27 PM
My dad calls me "The Drunken Chef". He is convinced that I cannot make anything without alcohol as an ingredient. With this post, I make no effort to disprove his theory.

A post I saw today asking for kahlua recipes, and the fact that I have guests coming Friday who have requested one of my (apparently famous) chocolate cakes, prompted this post.

I get many requests for this cake, and it can be tailored to suit any pallet. I can't imagine an easier recipe - this is in just about every cookbook I own, but it is just so darn good - I make only a few very small changes, but it makes a world of difference!

2 cups sugar
1-3/4 cups all-purpose flour
3/4 cup good, dutch cocoa
1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1-1/2 teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
2 eggs
1 cup whole milk
1/2 cup vegetable oil
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
3/4 cup boiling water
1/2 cup liqueur of your choice


Heat oven to 350°F. Grease and flour two 9-inch round baking pans. Put the kettle on to boil - you'll need hot water in a few minutes.

Stir together sugar, flour, cocoa, baking powder, baking soda and salt in large bowl. Add eggs, milk, oil and vanilla; beat by hand with whisk until combined. Add booze.

Before you add the boiling water, make sure your pans are ready and the oven is hot - as soon as you add the water and get it stirred in (the batter will be very thin - it will be OK, I promise) - pour batter into prepared pans and get them into the oven. The hot water kicks starts the reactions that cause the cake to rise - mess around here and you will end up with flat (but tasty) cakes!

Bake 30 to 35 minutes until done. Cool completely before frosting.

Right before you frost the cake, sprinkle both layers with more of your favorite liqueur. I suppose you could use a pastry brush and paint it on, but I am not that dainty - I stick my thumb over the mouth of the bottle and sprinkle away. . .


Frost with Uber-Special Truffle Booze Frosting:

(Here again, another old standard, but with a twist)

1-1/4 cups whipping cream
1/4 cup light-colored corn syrup
1 12-ounce package (2 cups) chocolate chips
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup liqueur of your choice

Put your chocolate chips in a heat resistant mixing bowl and place on the stove where it will be slowly warmed while you are mixing up the cake.

In a medium heavy saucepan bring whipping cream, booze, vanilla, salt and corn syrup to a simmer

Pour over chocolate chips; let stand for 2 minutes.

Whisk mixture until smooth and melted.

Cover and chill about 1-1/2 hours.

Beat with an electric mixer until fluffy.

Frost the cake.


I have had really good luck with Chambord (raspberry-chocolate is my favorite combination), Kahlua, coffee liqueur, creme de menthe, chocolate liqueur. . . even bourbon isn't bad.

For dark chocolate people, you can use a dark cocoa in the cake and a chocolate liqueur with dark, bitter chocolate chips - it's wonderful!

You can use milk chocolate chips too, just reduce the amount of cream or the frosting never really stiffens up (but it's still tasty - you can just sort of pour it over the cake. . .).
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 3 (view)
 
Lavender Cookies
Posted: 4/3/2007 8:08:51 AM
These are an interesting treat - certainly not something I would like every day, but they are good for something different.

More about culinary lavender here:
http://gourmetsleuth.com/culinarylavender.htm
 76keith
Joined: 3/29/2007
Msg: 1 (view)
 
Lavender Cookies
Posted: 4/3/2007 12:09:30 AM
A conversation with a friend tonight reminded me of a culinary adventure I had in January.

I ordered culinary lavender to make cookies as a gift for an old friend with unusual tastes. I spent a week playing with the recipe until I was satisfied that they were perfect. Along the way there were some pretty big misses. My first batch tasted like hand soap. One particularly bad version left me with a lingering threat for my oldest nephew - "You behave or I'll give you a cookie".

They are supposed to be an afrodisiac - I don't know about that, but the final version was exactly what I wanted: light and delicate - a hint of lavender. Perfect with good black tea.

Use it well:

1/2 cup butter
1/4 sugar
1 1/2 cups flour
1 heaping tablespoon dried lavender flowers
1 1/2 tsp vanilla
2 tablespoons sugar (for sprinkling)

Bash the lavender a bit with a mortar and pestle.

Stir together the lavender and vanilla and leave for an hour or so - this makes all the difference in the world.

Then:

Cream together butter and sugar. Stir in flour and lavender. Form a ball and refrigerate for one hour.

Preheat oven to 400

Roll out thin and cut (I prefer hearts). Bake about ten minutes until just starting to turn golden. Sprinkle with sugar while still hot.

Makes about a dozen.
 
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