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 Author Thread: Favorite Guilty Pleasure
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 32 (view)
 
Favorite Guilty Pleasure
Posted: 8/11/2012 7:23:12 PM
...Yanno, forgive me if I'm wrong, but I believe there's a little bit of caffeine in dark chocolate too. Just not enough to keep you awake at night!.

....Anywho, lately whenever I have a craving, I grab five slices of pepperoni, some mixed colby/jack cheese, a tortilla, and some Louisiana Hot Sauce. Slice the pepperoni in halves, line them up on one side of the tortilla, put a handfull of cheese on them, a dribble of Hot Sauce...and nuke for 36 seconds. Roll it..and it has the most chewy, gooey type of mouth feel satisfaction with a big piquant flavour.....I'm afraid I'm addicted to it.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 7 (view)
 
Blackberry Mascarpone Tart
Posted: 8/11/2012 6:11:06 PM
Thanks for the suggestion...I think I did use one of those little pyrex cups, but still didn't get the crust quite as thin as I wanted at the bottom corner. I'm wondering more about the ingredients in the crust. The flour/ground almond ratio that I used. Also the amount of butter. Like I said though after a couple days the moisture seeped into the crust making it very nice, so I'm not too far off, just need to experiment..:)
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 6 (view)
 
Quinoa Muffins (Best protein muffins)!
Posted: 7/22/2012 5:52:46 PM
There's a distinct possibility that quinoa raised with commercial fertilizer will have a higher protein content than organically raised quinoa. I recall a neighbor who was trying to get his organic speltz to meet his buyers demand for higher protein ..and he couldn't quite get it high enough without adding some commercial nitrogen to his soil. So possibly, both of you are right on the protein content of your quinoa...one may be commercially fertilized..and the other organically....
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 5 (view)
 
Blackberry Mascarpone Tart
Posted: 7/15/2012 11:35:57 AM
The glaze is what really made this tart special, otherwise you could use any other fruit out there...from peaches to strawberries. I can imagine rasberries being used...and a glaze made the same way (I might use a regular plum rather than the "dark purple") I can also imagine blueberries being used...the same way. As for any other fruits..I am a little leery of how they would come out. A strawberry glaze with just strawberry puree would be fine...It wouldn't have the plums in it at all. And I've processed peaches in much the same way...cooked them down until they were a nice sauce. So yeah...my attempt at a glaze was just an experiment....so you might as well give it a whirl too.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 1 (view)
 
Blackberry Mascarpone Tart
Posted: 7/6/2012 4:14:42 PM
I haven't posted anything in quite a while..but made a Blackberry Mascarpone Tart the other day that was rather incredible and had to share it with you. I was thinking of something to share at a 4th of July potluck...and was rolling Blackberry Cobbler around in my head. I happened to walk into my local market..and there at the entrance they had the most awesome looking blackberries I think I've ever seen. The darn things were as big as your thumb...and very firm, not mushy or green at all. So as I wandered around the store a little mascarpone cheese caught my eye and the mind started to work. I picked up a tub..got home and searched a bit for a recipe on the 'net, and found one that made a filling out of just mascarpone, heavy cream and powdered sugar. The crust wasn't too difficult...but they only wanted to place the blackberries right on top of the mascarpone filling. I wasn't quite satisfied with that...so the wheels started to turn again. What if I took some dark purple plums and cooked them down with some blackberries to make a glaze for under the blackberries? Now I had a plan...and here's how it went.

Took a cup and a half of all purpose flour...and half a cup of almonds (ground fine in a small food processor) , cup of sugar, and a stick of butter (use more or less...just beat together and press into a 9 inch tart pan. I had a springform pan with a removable bottom that worked really well to release the crust after baking. I baked the crust for 20 minutes at 350..and it was just barely showing a bit of brown when I took it out and let it cool overnight.

After getting the crust done, I cleaned each and every blackberry individually, trying very carefully to not break them up...or mash them. I rinsed them under running water, placed them in a stainless steel bowl, spread a bit of sugar on them and added a few splashes of lemon juice. Once they were in the bowl...I took another bowl and poured them bowl to bowl to blend the sugar without breaking them. After sugaring, I put them in the fridge overnight to absorb the sugar.

Then...I took 4 very nice dark purple plums (they were a beautiful purple all the way through) and pitted and sliced them into a saucepan...added some water, 5-6 blackberries...a generous dose of sugar (at least 1/4 cup..but probably not over 1/3) and a splash of lemon juice. Cooked them down till everything was pretty much liquid...and then strained them through a strainer. It was a pretty fine strainer, and I'm sure I spent at least 30 minutes working that pulp till the only thing left was the blackberry seeds. It made it more difficult with the skins from the plums...but I'm sure the color it added was worth it. The smell while cooking it down was simply amazing!
I then refrigerated it until morning when I planned on making the filling.

So...I got up the next morning with a lot of anticipation because the glaze was looking and smelling so excellent...and proceeded to make the filling. 8 oz. of mascarpone cheese and 1 cup of powdered sugar with a half cup of heavy cream was what the recipe called for. I remember thinking..this is too easy, I better watch out or I'm going to turn this cream into butter. Sure enough..I didn't read my recipe close enough...they advised blending the sugar and mascarpone together first..then slowly adding the cream. I ended up with one batch that was little more than a lumpy sweet mess..LOL! After venturing out for another tub of mascarpone...I got it right the second time. The recipe wanted you to blend it with a paddle on your mixer and then whisk it till it formed stiff peaks...I found the stiff peaks formed without even using the whisk attachment. After I got it blended, I then put about a 1/4 inch layer in the tart crust. After smoothing it out nicely, I then added the glaze very carefully to the top...smoothing it out in another 3/16 thick layer. After all the smoothing, all it took was arrainging the blackberries all around the top of the tart...and wow..I think I could have served it to royalty it looked so good. Took it to the potluck..and after the oohs and aahhs...we got busy eating and it soon became apparent how good it really was. I can't tell you how that glaze tasted, you'll just have to make it yourself...but it was one awesome addition to the recipe.

...The only thing I want to do different next time...is figure out the crust a bit better. The crust tasted awesome, but because I made it in a springform pan...the lower corner around the edge was rather thick. When we cut it..it was very hard to cut..and ended up being very "crispy". I don't know if I should bake it a few minutes less...or whether technique pushing it into the pan made it harder than I wanted...but I'm going to experiment with it...and hope maybe one of you can give me a few tidbits of advice.

...Edited note: I just ate a piece of this tart Friday night..3 days after making the crust. By now..enough moisture had worked into the crust..that it was firm but not crispy. It cut beautifully...and for future reference...I might say it could be made at least a day ahead of time and refrigerated until you want to serve it.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 13 (view)
 
Father's Day Menu
Posted: 6/17/2012 9:19:55 PM
..If the sun is that strong..and it's that hot out...you should probably invest in a solar oven, and just bake those potatoes outside....
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 10 (view)
 
Question about yeast
Posted: 5/9/2012 6:40:15 PM
<<< Izzz rather reluctant to say "Hey Idiot"..but I want your attention so...LOL.

.......Is compressed yeast any yuckier than say "Vegemite"? I don't know if you've ever had it...but it's the most godawful tasting thing I've ever been unfortunate to be exposed to..LOL. The Aussies love it though....so, somehow it must be an acquired taste thing...
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 5 (view)
 
the joy of spring
Posted: 5/9/2012 6:29:07 PM
...Strawberries are ripe in NW Ohio. Local major producer says it's the first time they've ever picked berries this early. The early ones leave a little to be desired. Size is great...but flavour is a little weak. Has anyone ever noticed that the darker centered (as opposed to white centered) berries always seem to be much more flavourful?
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 18 (view)
 
My dough won't rise!
Posted: 3/28/2012 7:14:42 PM
..Are you sure it would be mixed well enough to flavor the entire crumb of the bread??? I can see how it would react, and maybe add loft to a loaf, but can't imagine getting it mixed well enough to flavor..
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 27 (view)
 
Vegetarian Roast Elk
Posted: 3/16/2012 6:25:25 PM
BAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAH!!!!!!!! Jim! That's a classic.

I guess I better watch my spelling and punctuation or else I could become a target for anyone with a better knowledge of the Queen's language than I do.

..But seriously...Vegetarian Elk Roast? Do you shape it up out of beans or tofu...and how long do you have to leave it in the woods to get the proper taste of the wild???

...I think I'd just get me someone to share a little red deer venison if I had a hankering for elk meat in the UK.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 13 (view)
 
Is a Kitchenaid mixer worth it?
Posted: 3/15/2012 4:51:52 PM
...I guess the answer is, Oh Hell Yeah!!!...LOL

....One suggestion, if you're going to make bread every week..get one of the higher end models.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 10 (view)
 
pork cooked in duck fat
Posted: 3/4/2012 5:26:11 PM
I have to agree with you on the lamb fat. It takes someone who eats lamb and or mutton quite often to develop a taste for that fat. We raised lamb from the time I was born till I was 15 years old...and I still trim the fat on my leg of lamb when I eat it. I tolerate it better when I barbecue lamb chops, because it has quite a bit of marinade on it....and gets rendered quite a bit.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 12 (view)
 
Do you like nachos?
Posted: 2/15/2012 7:12:15 PM
..Rax..you're not one of those people that thinks squirrel brains are a gourmet treat are you? I read a book that detailed a seemingly "southern" taste for this delicacy...but they couldn't quite decide if it was a good way to end up with Cruetzfeld Jacobs Disease....LOL. I gotta admit, my post has nothing to do with the title of the thread...but then, it didn't seem the OP's did either..LOL
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 9 (view)
 
What's the weirdest thing you ever ate?
Posted: 2/9/2012 8:33:07 PM
For some reason, I like those Hostess Donettes with orange juice. Pop in a donut, sip of juice and chew...sweet and sour...it works for me. Another strange thing is dipping 'Nilla wafers in sour creme..same sweet and sour combination..with the mouth feel of fat from the sour creme.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 3 (view)
 
Pork Loin Chops (no bone) ideas.
Posted: 1/29/2012 3:19:38 PM
...If you have the entire loin..cut some chops off, and split them-without cutting all the way through. Stuff with a stuffing (pinning back together the edges with a couple toothpicks) and then brown in a large oven proof skillet (add some oil or shortening to your pan..these chops are very lean). Remove from skillet, add some onions, stock cubes (even the chicken would richen the sauce) maybe a knob of butter and some flour to thicken it..(Add anything you like to the sauce..even the peppers would be good.) Pop the chops back into the sauce..cover..and bake for 35-45 minutes..at around 350 degrees (don't ask me centigrade...just a medium oven). When you take them out to serve them..spoon the sauce over the chop. Lots of variations you can do to the sauce..the dressing ..but the results will be quite good.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 19 (view)
 
A perfect BBQ steak.
Posted: 1/25/2012 2:56:40 PM
..I'll bet the amount of burning would directly relate to how hot your fire is, and how long you have it on. I only have a steak on the fire for 4 minutes on each side...it comes out medium rare that way with my grill. I'm not sure a sauce would survive the heat I'm subjecting it to....especially if there's some sugar in it.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 7 (view)
 
i have a bone
Posted: 1/25/2012 2:52:50 PM
...bean soup (Navy Whites) or my mother has always used a ham bone (and whatever clings to it) in her vegetable soup. It has a tomato juice base..with all the prerequisite vegetables..including cabbage, canned or even fresh tomatoes, and potatoes.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 83 (view)
 
Do you think childless old men ever regret never having biological kids?
Posted: 1/22/2012 6:23:45 PM
...I regret it everyday. There are women who have contacted me here on POF that I don't make an effort to meet because they have no interest in having children anymore. I doubt I'll ever find one now too....
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 2 (view)
 
preserving whole dishes
Posted: 1/20/2012 2:52:40 AM
...I agree with ^^^, freezing an individual plate..or container of lasagna, spaghetti, soup, etc. is so much easier than canning it. I don't know how long you wish to preserve meals...but a month at a time isn't too long to keep these things in a freezer. I've frozen plates from thanksgiving, with the requisite turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes and vegetables frozen for quite some time...and all they took was defrosting to be almost as good as the first time around.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 30 (view)
 
What can you cook on a stick over a campfire?
Posted: 1/18/2012 8:15:22 PM
...wait a minute...you don't really believe they don't toss anything that will fit into European Weinies too do you? I mean c'mon..these are the people eating that blood sausage from another thread...LOL. They're as much a handful of mystery meat as anything...LOL
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 18 (view)
 
favorite steak seasoning
Posted: 1/18/2012 7:03:50 AM
...Equal parts Worcestershire sauce and Soy sauce...a healthy dose of Garlic powder and Onion powder...and a good dose of Lawry's seasoning salt. Add a little butter or olive oil..and either marinate the steak in it (if it's a little tougher grade) or brush it on before and during cooking. (Watch that arm hair..if ya like a crust on the beef with a rare middle you almost have to be cooking over a blowtorch with these thin steaks these days..LOL)
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 16 (view)
 
My dough won't rise!
Posted: 1/12/2012 5:24:24 PM
Bisquick is a whole 'nuther animal there David. If your Bisquick is old..you can spike it up with some baking powder..or baking soda and some type of acid source like creme of tartar..or even buttermilk, vinegar, or lemon/lime juice. I make pancakes with just plain flour, a tiny bit of baking powder, some baking soda..and lime juice for leavening. When your Bisquick is fresh..you have no need for additional leavening. But if it gets old..it won't rise quite right, but can be saved with one of the aforementioned ingredients.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 14 (view)
 
grass fed beef
Posted: 1/6/2012 5:32:10 AM
Molly...I'm not 100% sure, but I think that's the story behind Santa Gertrudis cattle. They didn't use Angus with the Brahma's...I believe they used Herefords..but the outcome was the same..a breed that can stand heat better and produce better carcasses....
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 7 (view)
 
My dough won't rise!
Posted: 1/5/2012 11:49:04 AM
..after I replied earlier, the cracker idea just seemed to be better and better. Maybe roll it out..poke it full of holes..brush it with some garlic/onion/rosemary butter, cut it with a pizza cutter and bake it. Ya never know..you might enjoy it just as much or more, LOL.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 6 (view)
 
refrigerator cookies
Posted: 1/4/2012 6:06:00 PM
..Well actually, by the definition you seem to be using, a chocolate chip recipe would be described as a "refrigerator cookie". I've seen a few of the oatmeal/bran/chocolate cookies before...and probably some other unbaked cookies that I can't remember.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 13 (view)
 
French Toast Restaurant style
Posted: 1/4/2012 5:35:00 PM
...If you want something a little different...there's a bread called "King's Hawaiian" bread here in the States. It comes in large round loafs or even dinner rolls. It has Pineapple added to it...and when used to make French Toast it's pretty awesome.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 12 (view)
 
grass fed beef
Posted: 1/4/2012 4:14:26 PM
...I think Caddyman has a very good idea. The beef..particularly a grass fed steer...needs hanging a little longer than a grain fed steer. Using it's own enzymes to tenderize the beef is a time tested procedure.
There is simply no way to get the marbling in grass fed beef that you get in grain fed beef. That's why you hear all the stories about Kobe beef, and the extreme measures used to get that marvelous marbling. I've always wanted to get some Wagyu cows..breed them to some good sized Angus bulls, and feed out the offspring to see if I could get prime carcasses by using some roasted soybeans in the final month to 45 days of being on feed. The additional oil from the soybeans should help build the marbling in the muscle...but they need to be roasted, or the proteins in them aren't easily digestible by cattle.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 25 (view)
 
What's cooking for New Year's Day?
Posted: 1/4/2012 3:56:36 PM
..Any mention of adding a bit of caraway seed in that saurkraut? Might make it a bit more "German". And I'm not too sure the amount of salt is super critical...yes you can probably overdo it...but the one time I watched an old fella making saurkraut (and I was probably 8-10 years old at the time) he would just toss a few big handfulls of cabbage in..grab a handful of salt and toss it in..and repeat. No measuring for him...unless it was from the bottle of brown pain killing liquid he always seemed to have close by.. ;)...LOL
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 24 (view)
 
What's cooking for New Year's Day?
Posted: 1/4/2012 3:20:00 PM
..Ya might think I'm crazy...but I love dipping Colby cheese in maple syrup..LOL
..Also, on the salty/sweet issue...If I could name one thing that is almost impossible to quit eating it until it's gone or you founder yourself, it would be chocolate and potato chips...LOL. (Hint: Brownies work the same way..LOL)
..And on the Kosher salt issue...Is it iodized like regular table salt? As far as I know, Sea Salt isn't.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 2 (view)
 
My dough won't rise!
Posted: 1/4/2012 3:13:33 PM
?? Make Crackers? I'm sorry if it sounds flip...but after you get it mixed, if the yeast isn't active you're pretty much screwed.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 12 (view)
 
balsamic
Posted: 12/31/2011 1:51:07 PM
...Yeah, ya kinda hate to screw up with the expensive stuff first..LOL, Enjoy!
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 3 (view)
 
balsamic
Posted: 12/29/2011 3:58:30 PM
Rachael Ray made an appetizer one day with apples, onions, toasted french bread slices cut on a bias...and a light drizzle of reduced store bought balsamic on it one day...It's pretty good, and with the type balsamic you've got, you probably wouldn't dare reduce it. Just toast the small bread slices...and cut up some apples in small chunks...about a half and half ratio to the amount of onion that you have. Start the onions in a small skillet, and after they start to wilt...dump in the apples. Get the onions carmelized, putting a light color to the apples...and then place them (and the onions) by spoonfuls on your bread slices...then drizzle the top of them with the balsamic. It's quite an interesting combination..with the sweet apple, carmelized onion...and the sweet and tart balsamic. ( I might warm your balsamic..but it might not be necessary)
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 39 (view)
 
perfect prime rib
Posted: 12/29/2011 3:50:39 PM
...Just a thought, but wouldn't leaving them set in the Knoor product tend to approximate "brining" them? I mean, MSG is sort of a salt....so wouldn't it make sense it acts the same way?
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 2 (view)
 
Left over prime rib......
Posted: 12/28/2011 2:55:26 PM
...are you saying no to using it on sandwiches because of a certain reason? I'm thinking it would go great on a hoagie roll with some provolone melted over it...
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 15 (view)
 
Good Ham Roast Recipe
Posted: 12/26/2011 6:30:37 AM
...I think there's a lot of people that don't know that a cured ham (Hot cured) usually has been heated to a temp that essentially cooks it. So when roasting it, you're basically reheating it, then glazing it, not really cooking it. Glazes always go on in the last 20-30 minutes of roasting...and there are hundreds of recipes. Anything from mustard glazes to rasberry or pineapple glazes works. I actually prefer not glazing a ham, but it does add a touch of decadence that works in the holiday setting.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 36 (view)
 
perfect prime rib
Posted: 12/25/2011 4:06:08 PM
...I also did a search for Alimet. It appears it is an amino acid feed supplement...which is corrosive. Sort of the way the juice of a lemon or orange is corrosive. The feed supplement is a combination of water, sodium (salt) and methionine, which is an essential amino acid. It was first introduced in 1979..and is one of the most widely used feed supplements in the world. Do some Googling of your own...on both Alimet...and Methionine. I'm not sure you'll be convinced it's harmless, but you will definitely have more information on what your chickens and hogs are being fed.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 35 (view)
 
perfect prime rib
Posted: 12/25/2011 3:35:13 PM
...The longer horseradish sets after you grind it, the mellower it will become. For instance, you probably need to pickle it with vinegar the way you described...but don't try to use it for about 30 days after refrigerating it. It might even take 3 months before it's mellowed to your taste. I like mixing pickled ground horseradish with just some mayonaisse for using on hot beef sandwiches...but I use a recipe similar to Kid's on corned beef for St. Patrick's day. It's pretty awesome on corned beef...
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 34 (view)
 
perfect prime rib
Posted: 12/25/2011 3:09:22 PM
...Did a 5.72 lb. prime rib today...started it at 500 degrees in the convection oven, had it in a great rack that held it up off the roaster pan, and got a terrific sear around the roast. But I definitely needed all the exhaust fans going in the house..the fat dripping in the pan was making it tough to see in the kitchen, LOL. Opened the door at 20 minutes...turned the heat down to 300, and left it for another 2 hours. Got it to 150 degrees (my mother isn't particularly fond of really rare beef) and had an awesome medium well done sides with medium-medium rare center pieces. I was in a food coma most of the afternoon...but it was worth it.. ;)
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 16 (view)
 
perfect prime rib
Posted: 12/23/2011 10:42:46 AM
dsljim...I wish you would ask your friend exactly what the feed supplement was that the HazMat team was cleaning up. See, in all fairness, if you spill a large quantity of milk these days..a HazMat team has to make a determination if it's an issue or not. In the feed industry, they use quite a few "surplus" feeds to make things more palatable or increase the energy content of the feed. A perfect example is a local feed company that uses out of date Archway cookies in their feed, and bread that is returned from stores that hasn't sold before the expiration date. We really do have a fairly clean feed supply....compared to the old days when we fed the hogs whatever happened to be scraped off the dinner plates in your home. If you think about it...we wouldn't be able to cook pork to only 145 degrees these days if the feed supply hasn't been improved enough to negate the chance of hogs developing trichinosis. I don't think feeding chicken blood to a hog is such an issue...they have digestive systems that are very similar to yours and mine...and we both eat rare beef or blood sausage...let alone sushi that hasn't been cooked at all. We criticize the industry for a lot of things...and a lot of times it's necessary, but all in all, I'd rather pick up a pork chop in the US, than any other country in the world.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 2 (view)
 
perfect prime rib
Posted: 12/22/2011 5:27:19 PM
...I just wanted to know where you found a prime rib at 4.99/lb.?

....I'm pretty sure it's going for around 9.00 here. Maybe I should go cruise some meat counters tonight...LOL

...Sounds good though. I'm a big fan of rosemary..so I probably would rub the outside of the roast with some olive oil to make the rosemary stick..and proceed pretty much the same way you did.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 21 (view)
 
pig roast
Posted: 12/8/2011 10:54:27 AM
...by golly, I like peaches....I must be just Peachy... ;)
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 29 (view)
 
My Pizza dough
Posted: 12/5/2011 7:17:25 AM
..I think if I read it right..my self cleaning oven will get up to 900 degrees if you lock the door shut. But I'd be afraid of turning a pizza into ash if I left it in there more than 4 minutes...LOL
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 16 (view)
 
pig roast
Posted: 12/5/2011 7:11:01 AM
I don't even like the idea of stuffing a turkey let alone stuffing a hog. But I do have one of those Oil Barrel roasters...and I like the 120 lb. size hog for roasting. We have always skinned our hogs..because it allows the fat to be trimmed a bit on the back of the hog before roasting. I've had people who borrowed my roaster wish they had followed my advice..because when they didn't trim the fat..they ended up with a huge fire from the grease dripping into the charcoal. If you want to baste the hog that is on a spit...I went to the local farm supply store..and bought a large (50cc) syringe for giving shots to livestock. It's perfectly sanitized..so you don't have to worry...but you can inject your marinade/mop sauce/basting sauce into the hog..and it will slowly ooze out as it rotates on the spit. When I roast one..I like to keep the roaster temp anywheres from 280F to 310F ...and I usually end up opening the roaster once per hour for replenishing the charcoal..and basting. A 120 lb. hog will be at 170F in the shoulder in under 7 hours for me if I keep my fire going right.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 51 (view)
 
Looking for new coffee!
Posted: 11/28/2011 4:28:44 PM
..probably the same people that call something like Balut edible..
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 3 (view)
 
Torch for creme brûlée
Posted: 11/28/2011 3:29:42 PM
You should never really have any fire on top of a creme brulee when using a propane torch. I hope it's one of the self igniting torches...if you have the old style where you have to open a valve and then light it with a match or "striker" tool it will be more dangerous. The new style that light themselves shut themselves off as soon as you let them go, so if you drop it or want to set it down..it will instantly go off. Play around with it..they aren't terribly complicated or dangerous. Wave your hand across the flame quickly to see how hot it is at what distance from the tip. You'll get the hang of it quickly. And no, Splenda will not work for carmelizing...
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 17 (view)
 
How to make easy peach Jam
Posted: 11/24/2011 7:37:46 PM
Oh by the way, my mother will substitute about half the sugar called for on the Certo pectin boxes when making some freezer jam...with Splenda. It's not cooked...so you really don't have any problems with it. If you have a sugar control problem..it might allow you to have some jam without all the carbs.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 16 (view)
 
How to make easy peach Jam
Posted: 11/24/2011 7:32:15 PM
I believe the breadmaker would do the stirring required to dissolve the sugar in your jam. Sounds like a pretty good idea to me...
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 84 (view)
 
Let's talk turkey......and stuff(ing).
Posted: 11/24/2011 6:55:35 PM
I'm a little late commenting. This morning (Thanksgiving Day) I listened to Bobby Flay answer the same question about brining. He's in the "no-brining" camp. He explains it like this....all brining does is make turkey juicier that is overcooked to begin with. I don't think it's necessary...but if you have the time, and have a history of dry birds...by all means give it a go.
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 7 (view)
 
whole lamb on a spit........ advice?
Posted: 11/24/2011 6:28:06 PM
I don't know what happened Texasbaby...but for some reason the forums section of POF disappeared for me a while ago..and all of a sudden I found them again. I thought they had dropped them altogether. Glad to be back. Hope y'all haven't had any major dust ups on the forum...I think we all can disagree, and still learn from each other even if we do have certain prejudices in our cooking. :)
 pupdaddy12003
Joined: 8/9/2007
Msg: 23 (view)
 
My Pizza dough
Posted: 11/24/2011 6:12:30 PM
...I've been having very good luck with a much lower temperature in the home oven than 475F. We will often bring home one of those "take and bake" pizzas from Papa Murphy's chain store...and the dough is very fresh, not cooked at all before they assemble the pizza. I'll do a little primping on them, by brushing the edge of the crust with olive oil, and sprinkling a little Italian Seasoning on it...but if I heat a pizza stone in the oven at 375, and drop the pizza on it's cardboard "pan" on the stone..I get a very crisp crust. I even fooled around and raised the temp to 425F one time..and got the crust too crisp before the cheese took just a little browning, and the pizza was bubbling in the center. It's been working for me very well.
 
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