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 Author Thread: Real Reason To Why Women Dont Date Very Tall Men?
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 100 (view)
 
Real Reason To Why Women Dont Date Very Tall Men?
Posted: 5/16/2010 4:23:02 PM
If a woman says "you're too tall, I can't meet you," she is politely saying, "I don't fancy you." Simples.

When I initiate contact with a younger man and he replies, "I'm looking for someone closer to my own age," what he's REALLY saying is, "You're a crusty old crone and me mates would take the piss if they saw us out together."

That's life. Take the punches and move on.
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 6 (view)
 
But...I'd give it all up for you!
Posted: 5/14/2010 5:09:44 AM
In 1994, I left behind my family, friends, memories and good career prospects back in California to move to South London with my new British husband. His family were (and still are) hostile towards me, he made a useless husband, and we divorced seven years later. I desperately wanted to move back to California (still do), but the courts won't allow me to bring my children with me without their father's consent, which he refuses. So I've had to continue living here, on my own, with my family and support system 6,000 miles away. My ex and I have been in and out of court since the divorce, things are still acrimonious and I never found love again. BUT....

I got two amazing sons out of that farce of a marriage, and they are worth every second of the aggro.

So on reflection, if I went back in time, I'd do it all over again.... just to get those SAME two children.

Would I do it again for anyone else? Not a chance. Never again.
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 4 (view)
 
Cheap hotels in Central London??
Posted: 4/18/2010 2:36:43 AM
Hiya, try the Premier Inn County Hall (used to be the Travel Inn) at:

http://www.london-se1.co.uk/places/premier-inn-county-hall

If memory serves, they've got a few hotels in central London. They're clean and tidy and well located.
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 11 (view)
 
Missing the kids
Posted: 4/7/2010 4:49:50 PM
My ex and I "share" the kids. They stay with him half the week, and stay with me half the week. Sometimes I feel empty when they go back to their dad's, but mostly I feel elated that I can get my flat back into some kind of a habitable state and that I don't have to fight for the PC or remote control again for a few days.
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 17 (view)
 
Childrens Parties?
Posted: 3/31/2010 5:59:23 PM
Something kids enjoy back home (in California) is smashing a pinata. I don't know how popular they are here in the UK, but Asda's selling them now (in the party stuff aisle). You fill them up with candy and sweets and let them beat it with sticks until it breaks open and candy spills out onto the floor and the kids scrabble around picking it all up.

Come to think of it, they should have pinatas at the POF events - filled up with miniature vodka bottles.
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 5 (view)
 
How far would you go?
Posted: 3/17/2010 12:31:06 PM
The topic I feel most strongly about is child abuse. I've marched, protested and signed petitions, etc. Violence? Well... I've fantasized about beating ten bells out of Tracey Connelly and Stephen Barker, especially after seeing their smug faces in court when we sat in the public gallery during their sentencing arguments. But not sure whether I could do it in reality (unless they attacked me). I'd probably just give them a good ol' Yankee-style ear-bashing instead.
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 11 (view)
 
Feeders
Posted: 3/15/2010 6:55:59 AM

She's only big to us.... In the US she's nothing more than average


Oh well done, Strider. I was wondering how long it'd take before one of you got the boot in. Just behave, will ya? Yank on board. Anyway, in terms of obesity, you lot are catching up with us at an alarming pace, so enjoy your fry-up!


To the OP, I suspect it's a fetish borne of her husband's insecurity. Obese women (should say 'people') are less likely to go out and draw unwanted competition from admirers. If we accept that over-eating is usually a symptom of low self-esteem, then it stands to reason that they're easily controlled psychologically and physically, as they become shut-ins. If her husband truly loved her, he'd want her to get healthy enough to grow old with him. In essence, her husband's insecurity is driving her into an early death.
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 43 (view)
 
Mothering Sunday 2010
Posted: 3/15/2010 6:24:13 AM
We didn't do a whole lot, just stayed at home. But my boys (nearly 9 and 13) gave me loads of hugs and made me a homemade, coloured-in card that reads:

"Dear Mother Dear,
You are the prettiest brown-haired lady I have ever seen in my life.
Happy Mother's Day (you deserve it).
From Finlay and Liam
xxxxxxxxxxxxxx"

Best Mother's Day gift a mom can get.
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 3 (view)
 
Ethnic groups may disappear completely
Posted: 3/14/2010 1:35:03 PM
Really enjoyed your post, Faithfey. Some interesting points in there that I hadn't thought of before. I just did a quick Google search on the book you mentioned, "An Island Story", and not sure which link is the right one... Who's the author? Is it a children's book? If so, I'd be interested in reading it to my two boys. A bit off topic, but I'm finding you really have to follow what schools are teaching (and NOT teaching) our kids so we, as parents, can fill in the gaps! Again, great post - really informative.
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 18 (view)
 
How many times do you see someone before you know if you fancy them?
Posted: 3/13/2010 11:14:08 AM
OP, listen to your instincts - they're trying to get your attention. In the past, I've given in and agreed to second dates with guys who appeared to like me more than I liked them, because my mom says I make hasty judgments about men. But those second dates always confirmed my gut feeling was spot-on. I can't be fussed with second chances now. If we don't click the first time round, it isn't meant to be. Next!
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 2 (view)
 
Was committee right to cancel Cheese Rolling event over safety issues?
Posted: 3/12/2010 11:59:01 AM
Have health and safety concerns ever stopped the event in centuries past? No, so why cancel it now? I've never seen this event, but had hoped to take my kids to see it someday... just for its sheer joyful wackiness. And my friends back home in California would have gotten a huge kick out of the pictures. It's yet another tragic example of a meddling nanny state stripping Britain of all its local colour and culture... and I think that's sad.
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 3 (view)
 
chatted up or just being friendly?
Posted: 3/12/2010 10:27:22 AM
I'm no good at spotting the signs either - low self-esteem. He'd have to pick me up and throw me over his shoulder for me to get the clue. They say if a man's pupils are slightly enlarged when he's looking at you, he likes what he sees.

On the other hand, it could mean he's been at the booger sugar...
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 32 (view)
 
When is too soon to stay over...?!
Posted: 3/11/2010 9:29:06 AM

Sheesh - it's only sex - what's the big deal? It's meant to be fun isn't it? Easy?? My current guy would laugh to hear that anyone thought I could be easy. Desperate? Too right - I can't wait to jump his bones every time I see him! And just for the record he's also a gentleman and treats me with love and respect.


I got the impression we were discussing first and second dates here. Of course sex is fun... and if you have a boyfriend, anything goes. If I had a partner, we'd be at it like rabbits too!

What my previous post referred to were first or second dates. If jumping into the sack straight away worked for you and your man, then good on you. But it's not a course of action I'd suggest for women - it's rare a relationship ever evolves from it. On those occasions when I've slept with someone too soon (in my wayward youth, of course), I never heard from him again. And that seems to happen to a lot of other women as well. It's just not a sensible move for women who are hoping to cultivate something more substantial than a one-night stand.

Edit:
vvvv It's worked for a few couples here and there, perhaps, but you're right -- it certainly hasn't been my experience. What on earth was I doing wrong before? LOL
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 31 (view)
 
When is too soon to stay over...?!
Posted: 3/11/2010 8:27:38 AM
There's no official rulebook, but if you're gonna sleep with a guy straight off, he's gonna think you do it with everyone. Don't expect to hear from him afterwards. That's just how it is. It puts me off when men invite themselves into my home at the date's end. A gentleman doesn't ask! He waits for the woman to feel safe enough to extend the invitation into her personal space. Even so, men almost immediately view these invitations into your home as an invitation to sex. Guys have come to expect sex on the first meet because easy, desperate women on these dating sites are giving it to them. They're spoiling men, and it's the more discerning women who are paying the price because even the normally "good guys" are refusing to wait.
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 3 (view)
 
buggies on buses facing crackdown.
Posted: 3/10/2010 3:12:12 PM
I've been on both sides of the issue. When my boys were little and we relied on public transport, it was indeed very difficult to travel with buggies and carrier bags whilst paying the fare and organizing where the kids will sit, all at the same time. Luckily, we live in an area with a lot of families, so most people were helpful and understanding. Very rarely heard anyone tut.

Now my kids are older and my son is a wheelchair user. Again, we've rarely had any problems. People are usually good about making space, especially parents with buggies, because they know how it feels. And I have no beef with buggies parked in disabled spaces if there are no wheelchair users onboard. One thing I have noticed, though, is that when my son is using his collapsible walking frame, I have on occasion needed to tell an able-bodied person to move out of the "special" seats (those designed for pregnant, elderly or disabled people). Now, that does pee me off.

I believe we're all equally entitled to use the buses and we should all try our best to accommodate each other. I shouldn't have to tell someone to get up so that my disabled son can sit down. They should do it automatically, without being asked. If they don't, I will quite happily publicly embarrass them... and no mistake.
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 20 (view)
 
Describe your favourite time of day!
Posted: 3/9/2010 7:05:17 AM
If I had a man, my favorite time of day would be first thing in the morning, enjoying a sexy snuggle-up before the day's chaos begins.

At the moment, the best bit of my day is last thing at night, burrowing under my duvet watching one of my crime drama DVDs like Silent Witness or Trial & Retribution.
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 44 (view)
 
Rod Stewart waives fee
Posted: 3/9/2010 5:47:46 AM
Rod Stewart and Elton John and their kind lend their names only to high-end, high-profile, black-tie, £1,000-a-plate fundraising orgies of back-slapping, glad-handing and picture-posing for glossy mags -- with very little of the funds raised actually reaching the needy.

When was the last time one of these overindulged luvvies paid for new incubators in a local hospital's neonatal unit, sponsored a youth activity centre in an impoverished community, provided college grants to poor kids, paid to keep a struggling local library or petting zoo/farm open another year?

For seven years, my son attended a horse riding school for disabled riders. It's run entirely on donations, by big-hearted, civic-minded volunteers, and the good this centre does for these people is incalculable. Yet every year, they struggle to meet their annual costs. Where's Elton? Where's Rod? How much money to those big-heads need to survive comfortably in this world before they'll deign to share their good fortune with the needy in their midst?

As long as there is need in this world, there will be such thing as earning too much money. Countless worthy grassroots charities are going cap in hand because they're not high-profile enough for the attention-seeking Eltons, Hiltons, Stewarts and Beckhams of this world.
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 42 (view)
 
Rod Stewart waives fee
Posted: 3/9/2010 4:30:51 AM

So Rod Stewart, the Scottish lad turned pop star with a gravel voice and a face to match, has waived his ONE MILLION pound fee to play in front of Prince Charles as a treat for his birthday bash. With all the money he makes why does he need to charge such a fee anyway? Has he not got enough money now? at 63, you think he would have enough to retire quite happily on, (or maybe he has to pay all his ex wives 20% each!!)
What do you think of him charging such an astronomical fee for a performance? and anyone else for that matter....


Wow. I have so many issues with this story.

First of all, for Rod to "waive his fee as a birthday treat" for one of the world's richest men kinda defeats the object. Prince Charles wouldn't even miss the £1 million. If Rod wants to "treat" someone by waiving his performance fee, why not a worthy small local charity, perhaps?

Second, I have issues with any singer earning - or charging - those obscene fees, no matter how good they are. They're only singers, for Christ's sake. It's not like they do anything important, like deliver babies or perform life-saving operations, or rescue children from abusive homes.

I feel the same about footballers and other celebrity performers. That the least useful people in our society reap the greatest rewards proves how askew our priorities are.
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 2 (view)
 
Things that make you go ewwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww
Posted: 3/8/2010 4:50:54 PM

are there some practises or past-times that really shouldn't be allowed?


I've twice seen grown men on the train and Tube pick their nose... then eat it off their fingers. Oh. My. God. These were grown men!!! Makes me retch just remembering...

Other things...
*anything to do with poo (human or animal), especially when my boys leave a mudslide down the back of the pan
*men with hair sprouting out of their noses and ears
*women with beards (how can they not notice???)
*blowing your nose into a tissue and looking at it
*sleepy-seeds
*finding bits of God-knows-what floating round in my bottled water after my kids have backwashed in it...
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 16 (view)
 
American threads vs British
Posted: 3/7/2010 7:14:15 AM

A popular English sport, Football pre-existed it and pre existed the Football Association (there's a clue in the name) from which the word 'Soccer' was derived.


Hmm, not really sure what point you're scraping for here, Cornucopia. The origins of the two games is of no relevance here, nor is it of any interest to me, since I can't stand either one. They are two completely different sports altogether. They just happen to share a common name to some people. I'd be quite surprised to learn "American football" (as you know it) was invented by anyone other than North Americans, though. And if the British invented football (or "soccer" as I refer to it), well... yippety-skippety-doo-dah. Bovvered.

Doesn't change my previous point that it's pedantic to get all het up over which is the "right" term for the two sports, and who invented the games, etc. I mean, who really gives a rip? Both terms are technically correct to those who say them.
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 7 (view)
 
Buzzing Bedroom Buddies (and other things ...)
Posted: 3/7/2010 4:51:46 AM
Having read what other forumites say they get up to, I feel embarrassingly "vanilla" by comparison. My mates kept banging on about how great sex toys are, so I tried it once, but it frightened the bejesus outta me. Reminded me of a Black & Decker power drill. It felt cold, mechanical and uncomfortable, so I binned the godawful thing.

These days my DIY sessions require only my rich, fertile imagination and some gay male porn. Seeing big, butch, muscular, tattooed men go at it never fails to rev me up.

On those increasingly rare occasions when I'm lucky enough to have a partner in bed, he only needs to be passionate, gentle and respectful to satisfy me.
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 15 (view)
 
American threads vs British
Posted: 3/6/2010 5:43:39 PM

what is it with Americans calling football soccer-gggrrrrr a pet hate of mine.


Um... probably because soccer is what we Americans happen to call the game. It would make sense for us to refer to the game as something other than "football", given that a popular U.S. sport called football already exists. Not too difficult to work out, really. Why be so bloody-minded and pedantic about it?
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 6 (view)
 
American threads vs British
Posted: 3/2/2010 1:08:42 PM
I stick chiefly to the UK forums. I'm American but I've lived in England for 16 years, so aside from POF's road-tripping issue, the news-related threads here have more relevance to me. I can see why a lot of Brits view Americans as being preachy religious zealots and I agree that, compared with the British, we Yanks tend to get over-excited about things. On the other hand, as another poster stated, English people (forgive the sweeping generalisation) do seem to enjoy slagging off other cultures. They don't see how judgmental, contemptuous and imperious they can appear to the rest of us. It's the better travelled individuals who are more likely to be tolerant and accepting - and see the beauty of all cultures.
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 4 (view)
 
Lifers, should they be given chance to get parole?
Posted: 3/1/2010 4:23:26 PM

the rest, well just the usual ranting ravings of dimwits and “hang em and birch em” rabid Daily Mail readers and kiloney’s who think Jail is meant to be punishment, convinced that harshness and cruelty to prisoners is a fine way to prevent crime.....so let’s hear the loonies guide to a better society...we stopped murdering our prisoners around fifty years ago, we won’t be going back to it (ever)...now take that on board, if it’s within your comprehension...


If you think Sutcliffe is such a helluva-nice-misunderstood-guy, then why don't you put him up while he's out on parole. I'm sure he'll be most grateful, even if your neighbors won't.

I think you'll find that this "touchy-feely" approach is lost on murdering sociopaths. Even reasonable, right-minded people believe retribution has its rightful place in crime control policies.


And while we are at it WTF is him changing his name all about?


Word has it he stalks dating site forums under an assumed name, spewing out over-loquacious, verbose, attention-seeking, rambling, long-winded, unreadable epics that his long-suffering fellow forumites skip over in favor of a post with merit.
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 5 (view)
 
Gif image (not a smilie) posted in forums…
Posted: 2/27/2010 2:44:20 PM
:www.plentyoffish.com/smiles/icon_232.gif:

Nope, didn't work.

It seems you can just "click" on the smilies... but this gif has me stumped.

Also, are there are any other gifs like the one above?
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 1 (view)
 
Gif image (not a smilie) posted in forums…
Posted: 2/27/2010 12:27:28 PM
Hi there, someone used a gif image (not a smilie) in the forums recently. When I clicked on its "properties", it had the link: www.plentyoffish.com/smiles/icon_232.gif

Which suggested it was generated by the site. How can I find it/use it myself? I've seen POF's official list of emoticons, but no official gif images like the one above. Where are they?

Thanks

Deborah
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 6 (view)
 
Increasing expense of children
Posted: 2/26/2010 7:10:23 AM

I agree totally on the xmas thing....I set a budget of £50-100 on each of my kids, not a penny more.... My children are also taught the value of money my oldest who's 12 gets a monthly pocket money into her bank account she has to manage that money for school dinners, cinema trips, clothes and any treats she wants.


I hear ya, SearchSpark. My two boys are nearly 9 and 13, and they're really good at managing their "allowance" and "birthday" money. They also earn cash by doing extra little chores round the house.

My eldest is mad for WWE DVDs. He buys every match ever recorded, watches them, sells them on eBay, then spends what he earns on new ones. My youngest is the math wiz of the family. He's also good at saving for the extras that he wants.

One year the boys asked for a Wii. I told them I couldn't afford it, so they saved their pennies and, within six months, they had enough to buy it themselves! I was sooooo proud of them.

Not ONCE did they whine or stamp their feet or "demand" I buy it for them. They just accepted the facts. It's given them a strong work ethic, even at their tender ages. They're always looking for ways to "earn" money for extras.

[stops here at risk of becoming 'proud mommy bore' LOL]

Parents, your kids will STILL love you, even if you don't buy them everything they want
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 4 (view)
 
Does this virtual environment phase you?
Posted: 2/26/2010 5:41:41 AM
Generally speaking, no, the occasional jibe doesn't phase me, but we've all gotten mildly annoyed at spite and pettiness from time to time (for instance, trollish, attention-seeking graphics posted by mean-spirited souls with a "mod" complex). Like SearchSpark, I can be a sensitive soul, as I try to be nice to my fellow forumites. But to be fair, as soon as you log off, your mind turns to the "real-life" matters at hand - the phone rings, the cat demands feeding, Eastenders starts... 'lifely' sorta things.
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 15 (view)
 
Natural wonders of the World
Posted: 2/25/2010 6:24:43 PM

What is your favourite natural wonder of our planet and why?


The beautifully toned, sinewy, nude body of a muscular young man (say, 25ish) - in his prime, his physical peak. That's gotta rank among the world's greatest, most awe-inspiring sights to behold. Like Michelangelo's David.

No, truly... I'm not joking.

It's just... glorious (sigh...)
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 75 (view)
 
Should A Parent Be Financially Punished For Denying The (Ex) Access To Their Child(ren)?
Posted: 2/25/2010 6:14:52 PM

kids are the only REAL reason we are here, the other stuff (holidays/cars/nights out ect) is just to pass the time whilst we wait for our kids to grow up and have kids of there own


What a beautiful sentiment, Deliverence1. I couldn't agree more.
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 29 (view)
 
Ideal 1st Date??
Posted: 2/25/2010 3:15:53 PM
Tell ya what, Minnx... although I usually go to concerts with friends or a date, there were two live bands I really wanted to see and I ended up having to go on my own ... and had a blast! Made new friends and had a rockin' time!
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 23 (view)
 
Superiority Complex
Posted: 2/25/2010 8:52:26 AM
Aunty, you clever little thing ;-) Thanks for the tip-off!

Indeed, as AuntyBulgaria discovered and pointed out, the original post was written by a Hindu blogger named Meghana Pathak. It's at:

http://meghanaunleashed.blogspot.com/2009/07/superiority-complex-personality.html

Ms Pathak wrote:
"In our day to day life as we meet people suffering from Inferiority complex, same there are some of our friends, relatives, colleagues who suffer from superiority complex ‘having a very high opinion of oneself ‘.This is another type of subconscious personality disorder. These poor uplifted souls cannot control their own boasting, tendency to discredit others opinions, intentionally drawing attention of others. You should not mix superiority complex with confidence; some people have developed feelings of confidence in a certain field due to their real strength in it. You may feel very confident about public speaking, for example, if you’ve been practicing it for years; it doesn’t mean you feel superior on account of inner inferiority, it just means that you know and are confident that you’re good at it. Studies have suggested that almost every species having at least one case of Superiority Complex.

"The problem with superiority complex is that it’s usually a direct result of an underlying inferiority complex; the subject is suffering from feelings of inferiority and thus compensates those feelings by acting superior. The problem with superiority complex is that although the person is one hundred percent sure he is inferior in some way, he still acts arrogantly. He may refuse to see a doctor for example as he feels superior to the doctor and will thus never get a proper treatment.

"Many Presidents, priests, celebrities and distinguished scientists sometimes suffer from Superiority Complex."


OP lifted it, virtually verbatim. There's no harm at all in using someone else's work on the forums... so long as they are rightfully attributed.
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 11 (view)
 
Superiority Complex
Posted: 2/24/2010 11:03:30 AM
^^^ Well said, Cetanu!




I'd rather people just come out with it and share their inferiority issues rather than act all "confident" or even arrogant


These are the ones we not-so-affectionately refer to as "last-word freaks". You know what I mean
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 21 (view)
 
Ideal 1st Date??
Posted: 2/24/2010 9:00:16 AM
Don't know why anyone voted to delete your thread, OP. Yes, this topic has been done before, but it was a loooooooong time ago and it deserves to be resurrected now and again as newbies join the forums.

Anyway, like most other posters, my policy for a 'first meet' off the site is to keep it simple - coffee or a drink - and then play it by ear. If you agree to meet him/her again, then in my opinion, it's your first "date" and merits more imagination.

If you're meeting in London, I recommend the two-hour guided walking tours (like Jack The Ripper or Charles D ickens's London, for example). It's only £7 each and usually includes a pub stop.

Some girlfriends and I once hooked up at Namco Station at County Hall (London) to play on all the big kids' games - and loved it! It was a bit pricey, but they had a giant Guitar Hero, turbo bumper cars, American pool tables and techno-bowling and a bar, all in one space. We were in our element lol. I can see a place like that making an unusual date venue.

Comedy clubs also make good first dates. Laughter boosts the feel-good endorphins and gives you a chance to see if your date has a sense of humor.
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 9 (view)
 
Schools and methods of learning
Posted: 2/23/2010 2:28:40 PM
It's always great to hear a parent express concern for their child's education, OP. You'd be surprised how many parents don't give a rip.


My question is do you think that all children have different ways of learning, i.e. memory, sound etc?


Absolutely, yes. My understanding is that every child has one (or a combination of) three key recognised learning "styles":

Kinesthetic/tactile learner - learns best by handling and exploring objects to grasp a concept. For instance, give them actual "blocks of ten" detachable units (you can buy these at teacher's resource stores) to teach adding/subtracting. They can push the "blocks of ten" together to form, say, 20 or 30; or they can detach each unit (little block) if you want to show them what 10-2 "looks like" in practice.

Visual learner - self-explanatory, but they learn best by seeing a concept or equation written out; or by an action being modelled for them.

Auditory learner - again, self-explanatory. They learn remember best by listening and repetition.

Many kids are a combination of these styles. My 8yo son is an auditory learner, but my 12yo, like me, is a kinesthetic/visual learner.


Have you had any experience of the 'new' reading system? How were you taught at school - was there more emphasis on memory based learning?


When I started school, back in the early 1970s in California, they had just started introducing the phonetic system, which was hugely successful for most of us. I excelled at English and literacy, which may be as much down to natural aptitude as teaching methods. Every child will have a natural aptitude for some subject(s). I don't have any experience of the "new" reading system. I taught my children how to read (phonetically) before they started school.


Do you think that there should be a mix of teaching methods as children learn in different ways?


Absolutely. A good teacher will have a variety of teaching methods in her arsenal, so that if one method doesn't work, another one will. It's up to parents and teachers to find out how our children learn best and then present the material accordingly.

Kids always amaze me with how clever they are. I never learned how to impart the concept that in some words a "gh" makes the "f" sound (as in "enough"), and in others the "gh" is silent ("borough"). Yet, they always seem to pick up the subtle differences with practice.
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 39 (view)
 
Should A Parent Be Financially Punished For Denying The (Ex) Access To Their Child(ren)?
Posted: 2/23/2010 10:55:10 AM

Why would you want to take away money from the main carer of the child? You will mostly be taking it away from the child as the main casrer will still have to pay everything the same on the necesities, there will just be less for the good stuff. I think any parent wanting to impose such a thing has less interest in the child than in revenge. And yes, I'd stop someone seeing my child too if they were such a mean hearted person. And it would probably be in the childs best interest.


So essentially, you think mothers ought to be able to play with everybody's emotions (including their children's) with absolute impunity? Wow. That nearly left me speechless.

Nearly.

I take the polar opposite view, which is: Any mother willing to emotionally abuse and manipule her child just to spite the father isn't a fit parent and should have said child taken from her and handed straight over to Dad!

Naturally, if Mom's denying access on proven grounds of paternal abuse or neglect, then fair play to her. But to do it out of spite? Balls to that! We don't have a right to do that to our children. What are you thinking, lady?

For you to blame fathers for being justifiably angry at such appalling treatment defies all comprehension. Men have every right to be angry at being demonized and manipulated at someone else's selfish whim. If the tables were turned, you'd be angry at such treatment, too. Children are not pawns or bargaining tools. We don't "own" them. We have only a responsibility to raise them to the best of our ability, then set them free.

My ex-husband and I can't stand the sight of one another. But our sons stay with him four nights a week and they stay with me three nights a week. We share the boys damn near equally... and as a result, our boys have good, strong, healthy bonds with each of us. One of the few things my ex and I ever agreed on was that our boys were entitled to both of us.
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 26 (view)
 
lonely holidays
Posted: 2/23/2010 10:17:41 AM
I really felt your words, Cheeky. I've spent a few Christmases alone with my kids, too, and it takes every fibre of courage you have to stay cheerful for the kids' sake, when all you want to do is cry. Take some consolation in the fact that ours is the truest expression of love... to make Christmas special for our kids even when we're feeling alone and down.

@amandagud - Really feel for you, too. My 12yo son is a walking frame/wheelchair user, while my 8yo son is able-bodied. My 12yo is pretty sociable (sometimes TOO much so - won't stop talking!), but finding places that are easily accessible and accommodating for him, and still fun for his little brother, can be daunting. Not that I can afford to take them on holidays anyway....
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 5 (view)
 
An Ideal Curriculum
Posted: 2/22/2010 2:42:01 PM
Good question, OP. As a mother of two, I've thought about this subject, too. There are a few subjects that really ought to be taught as a matter of course to all secondary students.

I'd suggest a class on Life Skills - ie, just general living skills like money management, fixing things round the house, what to do in emergencies, etc. In theory, parents will pass on such tips, but tragically, it doesn't always happen.

I'd also introduce Parenting Classes and/or Basic Child Psychology, as having babies is something most of us do sooner or later.

Basic Computer Skills and Basic Economics are two other subjects of which every teenager should have at least a working knowledge.

Perhaps these courses are already mandatory in secondary schools? I'm not sure...
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 82 (view)
 
The rise of the cougar...
Posted: 2/21/2010 9:18:04 AM

Sounds like you need the equivalent of a Russian submarine......Long, hard, and full of seamen that can keep banging away for days!



As for the supermarket comment, the younger guys I have been involved with would often come with me to help as I find it a bit difficult negotiating the aisles in my Zimmer frame these days



they probably do pull a lot of younger blokes but how many of the captured prey could pass a breathaliser test?



Luvvin' these comments! Y'all are hilarious! I'm laughing my big ol', toyboy-luvvin', yankee-doodle, cougar a*se off over here! It's all good MWAH!!!
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 74 (view)
 
The rise of the cougar...
Posted: 2/21/2010 7:44:48 AM

the fact remains whether we like or lot, the vast majority of relationships do not last where there is a large age gap.


You're presuming we want them to last. In any case,...


the fact remains whether we like or lot, the vast majority of relationships do not last


...would have been a more accurate statement.


Walk down any high street and you will not see hundreds of older women with a young stud on their arms. Just doesn't happen.


Oooh, but that doesn't mean it ain't happening behind closed doors!
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 54 (view)
 
The rise of the cougar...
Posted: 2/21/2010 3:50:56 AM

I'd say that 80% of messages I get now are from them...


@Cetanu: Just wondering how you feel about being contacted by so many older women? Is it irritating, flattering, don't-care-either-way?


And I don't see why a younger guy would go for an older woman unless it was for sex or money. It might boost your confidence in the short term, but when you really look into it, it's just sex.


@Susie: That's a very closed view of the world. You're also making a lot of assumptions about people's motivations and who's getting his or her ego massaged in this scenario. A younger man once told me it's a huge ego boost to please an older woman - sexually and otherwise. They also say they are attracted to the older woman's confidence and ability to articulate what we want. Sometimes it is just about sex, just like in any other relationship. Other times, it's simply about two people who happen to like each other's company while being mature enough to accept any boundaries that an age-gap relationship may bring. In recent years, I've known two men in their 20s who wanted a proper relationship with me. It was me who wasn't ready to commit, not them.


That wasn't my experience when I had a relationship with someone ten years younger. We really enjoyed each others company and sex was no different outside the realms of any other relationship I've had and I was also welcomed into his family. We are still friends now after 13 years. A friend of mine who has a 17-year age gap with her partner has been with him 22 years now. It's these myths that need to be broken down. Sure, some will be about sex but isn't that the same in a lot of 'ordinary' relationships?


@Me, Myself And I: Nicely put. Quite agree. It's not as though older men can't be players, is it?
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 59 (view)
 
What do We Like about the Opposite Sex?
Posted: 2/20/2010 10:52:29 AM
I like the men who know women are the superior sex.







messages messages messages messages messages messages messages messages messages messages messages messages messages messages messages messages
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 38 (view)
 
The rise of the cougar...
Posted: 2/20/2010 10:43:57 AM
^^A thread of this nature was bound to make some people feel redundant and insecure.


messages this short and all that....
messages this short and all that....
messages this short and all that....
messages this short and all that....
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 34 (view)
 
The rise of the cougar...
Posted: 2/20/2010 8:44:58 AM
Air New Zealand did a hilarious (and controversial) telly ad about cougars. It kinda sums up the popular notion of a cougar (although in my experience, it's the young guys chasing us!): www.youtube.com/watch?v=-zG7LejcRm4


Does there come a point when all the endless "cougaring" becomes tiresome?


I'm sure we're intelligent enough to recognise that time when (and if) it comes.


Will it always be short lived?


It is for some, isn't for others. Demi and Ashton seem to be doing okay.


What does it say about the women who seeks out the far younger chap?


It says she's life-loving, vital, sexually confident and young-spirited. The haters are jealous.


Is he more virile, attractive and fun than his older counterpart?


Some are, some aren't.


How does the older chap feel about being overlooked for a guy half his age?


Probably the same as mature women feel when they get left in the dust for some nubile temptress.
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 90 (view)
 
Why is it that apparently any type of music is deemed as acceptable apart from metal
Posted: 2/19/2010 1:47:07 PM
I go to those gigs just to ogle the dead-tasty metal boys! Love seein' guys with long grungy hair, tats, goatees and rock tees leapin' aboot on stage, rippin' the frets, getting all sweaty, screamy and testosterone-y. It's a visual orgasm. Drives me wild!
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 12 (view)
 
The rise of the cougar...
Posted: 2/19/2010 1:35:43 PM

Would anyone admit to being a cougar or is it generally a guilty pleasure?


Guilty as charged. And I don't care a hoot who knows I like my men younger. Even my Mama knows! She doesn't understand it, mind you, but she knows.

I just can't see the advantage of dating some sad, bitter, bloated, flabby, used-up, flaccid old pub crawler when attractive women my age (and older) can pull his slim, muscular, tight-tummied son instead. If a mature man has the means to bag silly-headed young dollybirds, he'll do it. So why shouldn't women do the same?

That's not to say I'd rule out a mature suitor. I still see loads of men around my age who'd I'd happily date, especially if he's taken care of himself, is young in spirit and can burn the frets on a six-string. The great love of my life was two years older than me... and I'd have stayed with him until the end of time.
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 7 (view)
 
Do women forgive cheating men too easily in this country?
Posted: 2/19/2010 1:10:37 PM

your only hope is to really scrape the bottom of the barrel and start dating us gingers...



A ginger dating another ginger?!? Now that WOULD be unforgiveable. In fact, I think it's forbidden in the Magna Carta or sumfink
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 66 (view)
 
Dating for disabled people
Posted: 2/18/2010 3:12:41 PM

why assume only disabled people would want to date disabled people???


Bang on, Pants. My 12yo son uses a walking frame, and sometimes a wheelchair. He's girl-mad and all his "girlfriends" at school have been able-bodied. He doesn't even see himself as disabled. He gets mad if I even use the phrase "differently abled". He said, "I am what I am, the way God intended. Don't give me any labels." He's the dog's b*llocks, my boy!
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 6 (view)
 
Do you consider yourself tolerant?
Posted: 2/18/2010 2:05:23 PM

Do you consider yourself to be tolerant? Can you honestly put hand on heart and say that you believe everyone deserves an equal chance. Dependant of age, colour, religion, size, ability ... ?


I'm only tolerant of things over which none of us have any control, such as physical (dis)ability, race, age, colour, gender, etc.

I'm proudly INtolerant of anything over which someone has control: ie, their actions, stupidity, diet, religion, beliefs, attitudes and musical choice. For instance, there's no excuse for listening to Status Quo. None.
 electric-gypsy
Joined: 10/23/2007
Msg: 6 (view)
 
Do women forgive cheating men too easily in this country?
Posted: 2/18/2010 10:43:48 AM
Yer... the problem with "the good guy, the loving guy, the one-woman guy, the caring guy, the family guy" is they're always munters. I can't be doing with it. Why can't really fit, hot-lookin' 20-summat lads with tight tummies, toned pecs and fat wallets be "loving, loyal and caring"? That's what women really want, dammit.
 
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