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 Author Thread: Is chiropractic treatment quackery?
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 33 (view)
 
Is chiropractic treatment quackery?
Posted: 10/18/2016 10:43:40 PM

Could the name "Chiroquackter" be properly applied to a quack chiropractor?


It can be properly applied to ALL chiropractors.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 25 (view)
 
Is chiropractic treatment quackery?
Posted: 5/14/2016 10:32:32 PM

So the fact that you can view a subluxation is not enough proof?


A subluxation is an anatomical displacement, not to be confused with the imaginary 'subluxation' that chiropracters diagnose all their patients with.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 23 (view)
 
Is chiropractic treatment quackery?
Posted: 5/14/2016 3:50:14 PM

Thank you DrSnore, Chiropractic has only been in existence for 120 years. Medicine has been around for 1000's. There are several factors that cause negative remarks, but it's mostly the uneducated public that doesn't understand Chiropractic that makes comments not based on fact. Who's to blame for that? Chiropractors!! I've heard the same comments for 15 years, and it makes me angry at the Chiro for not explaining/educating his patients on how the body works from the CNS to PNS, reasons for multiple treatments sometimes, etc. Unfortunately, several of these patients are correct. There are crooked Chiros just like in any other profession. People please do your research. Please ask the Dr. questions. It's not only your right, but your responsibility, especially when it comes to your children's health. Good to all and feel free to ask me any questions you like.


Chiropractors are not trained in 'how the body works' at all. There is no anatomical basis to their back 'adjustments' and make believe 'subluxations'.

This is a good example that has been doing the rounds on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2IU9emzBDRA

Talk about woo!
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 230 (view)
 
High Cholesterol ? Suggestions? Remedies?
Posted: 12/12/2015 2:20:31 PM

I did not read through this whole thread. It's very possible this was mentioned already.

What about organic Apple Cider Vinegar to help lower cholesteral and blood pressure??


Makes a good salad dressing, but not a blood pressure or cholesterol medication. Try plugging it in medline...you get rat and mouse studies.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 173 (view)
 
Instant Old Age
Posted: 12/5/2015 3:10:47 AM
Not all side effects bother patients, but until you progress beyond Piagets 3rd stage, you are limited to binary thinking.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 171 (view)
 
Instant Old Age
Posted: 12/1/2015 8:14:22 PM
The old shill gambit again- I thought I explained that reasoning flaw.

Drugs all have side effects...like anything these are weighed up against therapeutic benefit.

eg: "long-term use of statins has been associated with adverse effects including myopathy, neurological side effects and an increased risk of diabetes."

Tells you absolutely nothing about relative risk and whether it is clinically significant.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 169 (view)
 
Instant Old Age
Posted: 12/1/2015 12:13:41 AM


It's good to have your beliefs vindicated.

http://www.naturalnews.com/051636_statins_drug_scam_premature_aging.html


Not really.

It simply demonstrates how easy it is to spread misinformation to uneducated laypersons by using quotes out of context.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 9 (view)
 
Bio-identical Hormones?
Posted: 11/11/2015 11:59:20 PM

Skyr, I'm a nurse, I know about the endocrine system, but I'm not into getting a pissing match here. Bottom line is: I've used bioidentical progesterone creams and they have improved my life tremendously. MOst conventional docs dismiss it because they are indoctrinated in the "pharmaceutical grade" stuff that has been proven to do more harm than good.


No, it is dismissed for the reasons I explained. Many products are essentially the same, but of unknown quality or quantity. If it is bioidentical it acts on the same receptors, so can be expected to have the same adverse effects and contraindications.

In terms of endocrinology, adrenal fatigue is a quack diagnosis, not a medical one.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 7 (view)
 
Bio-identical Hormones?
Posted: 11/11/2015 12:39:16 AM

HRT hormones, such as progestins, do not have the same chemical structure as bioidentical hormones.


It depends whether you are after 'bioidentical', or simply 'natural'.

There are natural hormones derived from non-human sources (plant/animal) which are bio-identical to human oestrogens and progestogens. Many of these are also commercial preparations of HRT. There are also HRT products which are not bioidentical.

If it is a 'natural' product you are after, then there is nothing particularly natural about synthesizing bioidentical progestogen in a lab, even if the substrate is derived from wild yam.

The advantage of a pharmaceutical is:
1) you know the dose you are taking,
and
2) you have a pharmaceutical grade product

Bioidentical does not mean it is safe. If it has the same chemical structure as human oestrogen or progestogen, it will work the same way, and the same contraindications and adverse effects will apply. Would you use want oestrogen in someone with previous ER+ breast cancer? History of DVT/PE?


There is a definite connection:

http://www.dramybrenner.com/bhrt_cortisol.htm


What you have is a hypothetical claim extrapolated from a metabolic pathway, and referenced to a link about Adrenal Fatigue (a condition invented by alternative medicine practitioners to diagnose the worried well).

The primary feedback loop which controls cortisol is the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Adrenal insufficiency is treated with glucocorticoids, not progestogen.

Some useful links from the Australasian menopause society:
https://www.menopause.org.au/for-women/information-sheets/812-bioidentical-hormone-preparations
https://www.menopause.org.au/for-women/videos/complementary-therapies






 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 3 (view)
 
Bio-identical Hormones?
Posted: 11/8/2015 9:39:59 PM
Quite the opposite. Bioidentical hormones are often purified from the same sources as HRT, without any of the safeguards of the pharmaceutical grade product. You have no idea of the dose.


Progesterone keeps the Cortisol in check (excess Cortisol is bad, among other things makes you pack on and hold on to pounds).


It is generally not used for that purpose, because it is not part of the same hypothalamic - pituitary axis.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 11 (view)
 
Bacon, ham and sausages 'as big a cancer threat as smoking'
Posted: 11/7/2015 11:47:06 AM

Bacon, ham and sausages 'as big a cancer threat as smoking', WHO to warn

What are your thoughts on this?
Does that mean you're going to give up bacon or that you're just going to smoking while eating your bacon?


My thoughts are that it incredibly poor reporting by the Telegraph.

Processed meat is classified in the same category as tobacco smoking, but that has nothing to do with relative risk. It is about the strength of scientific evidence that a substance causes cancer.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 10 (view)
 
Bacon, ham and sausages 'as big a cancer threat as smoking'
Posted: 11/7/2015 11:36:42 AM

Industrial food-like substances are crap, denatured, lifeless, lacking in vitality and nutritive value, and as this report is saying, pathogenic.

The goal of BigFood is above all profit, NOT consumers' health, which is the least of their concerns.

That's why @ssholes who promote GMO "food" as harmless never talk about why Monsanto/Syngenta/etc created GMO "food", never talk about the air/land/water/animal/human toxicity of the chemicals SOLD to produce GMO food.


There is no evidence that GMO food causes cancer. On the other hand, millions of people would die within a few weeks without recombinant technology.

You're confused....this thread is about processed meat.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 3 (view)
 
Take your date to a Salt Room lately?
Posted: 11/6/2015 10:19:15 PM
Is this the latest and greatest from the quack industry?

I'll keep my ions charged and ready for oxidative phosphorylation :)
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 161 (view)
 
Instant Old Age
Posted: 9/12/2015 2:48:15 PM
This is getting rather puerile. You cannot articulate a single coherent argument to support your proposition, so resort to name calling. I can only educate those who wish to learn.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 159 (view)
 
Instant Old Age
Posted: 9/11/2015 10:05:43 PM
Of course I am. It's in my title, as originally intended, in Latin :)
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 157 (view)
 
Instant Old Age
Posted: 9/11/2015 3:05:38 AM
*irony*

This is procrastination when I should be coding. Nevertheless, I'm happy to educate others in my spare time.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 155 (view)
 
Instant Old Age
Posted: 9/10/2015 5:42:27 PM
Because I feel compelled to point out misinformation, and it is a public Messageboard.

Everything is a poison at the right dose :)
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 226 (view)
 
High Cholesterol ? Suggestions? Remedies?
Posted: 9/10/2015 12:45:49 AM


Thats exactly what I have said a dozen times, yet you have argued that point.


Well actually no, I haven't. I've pointed out that this is incorrect:



Evidence of a very low to almost non existent percentage in studies show less risk in some ,but do not come close to being a positive thing to do verses the side effects they cause in MOST people


The NNT for primary prevention in high risk patients (>20% 5 yr risk) is pretty good, male and female. Most statin side effects are mild or insignificant. For the patients who do not tolerate statins, physicians have a tool at their disposal, known as common sense, which allow them to lower the dose, or cease the medication, if necessary.


IF you have had a heart attack/some heart disease and not just a high cholesterol they *could* be beneficial in preventing heart attacks in some


I would think a 25% risk reduction in secondary prevention should be worded a little more positively than "could be beneficial". Perhaps I'm an optimist.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 153 (view)
 
Instant Old Age
Posted: 9/10/2015 12:33:55 AM
You what the medical council has to say about that ;)

Keep spreading the tinfoil hat theories, it's self fulfilling darwinism
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 151 (view)
 
Instant Old Age
Posted: 9/9/2015 3:12:35 AM

I can't think of a single instance when you would be qualified to help me. Physician heal thyself.


Perhaps you're right. I'm not a psychiatrist. I was referring to your toes.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 149 (view)
 
Instant Old Age
Posted: 9/8/2015 6:43:55 PM

And I feel compelled to stamp out stupidity, one ***hole at a time.


You must have very sore toes. I can help you, but I'm not registered in your country.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 147 (view)
 
Instant Old Age
Posted: 9/8/2015 3:18:07 PM

That depends, are you going to persist in recommending poison as a cure? Your arrogance may cost someone their health, or their life. I'd like to prevent that.


Statins are for cardiovascular risk reduction. It is not a cure for anything.

But I do feel compelled to correct misinformation when I see it :)
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 145 (view)
 
Instant Old Age
Posted: 9/8/2015 5:02:29 AM

Statins are poison.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZomZEPBdbM

Do you want to listen to Skyr?


Are you going to keep parroting the same thing on every thread?
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 223 (view)
 
High Cholesterol ? Suggestions? Remedies?
Posted: 9/8/2015 4:35:47 AM

skyr, do you recommend statins simply as a preventative measure for guys who have little risk otherwise, other than being male and being older?


That depends how low the risk and how much you want to prevent heart disease. The lower the risk, the lower the benefit, for obvious reason.

There is a good case for secondary prevention (someone who has had a heart attack or stroke)- we know it reduces the risk of another cardiovascular event by about a quarter or a third.

For primary prevention, the risk calculators are only as good as the information that go into them, but most guidelines recommend statins if the likelihood of a heart attack is >20% in the next 5yrs. For people in the 10-20% range, it's still reasonable, depending on the patient. The benefits are limited for those <10% risk.

You can play around with one of these yourself, they're mostly based on Framingham data: http://www.qrisk.org/

And no, I can't make a recommendation, that's for you to discuss with someone who knows your medical history (ie your doctor), and what you are trying to achieve.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 222 (view)
 
High Cholesterol ? Suggestions? Remedies?
Posted: 9/8/2015 3:55:56 AM

Statins are poison.


If you recall first year toxicology at medical school, everything is poison given the right dose. Drink enough water and it will kill you :)
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 212 (view)
 
High Cholesterol ? Suggestions? Remedies?
Posted: 9/3/2015 4:55:10 AM


I have high cholesterol as well - both bad and good are atrocious but at least they are basically the same level. It is heiretary and there is nothing I can do. My doctor does not suggest statins at all for me and I know for sure if I had a different doctor I have no doubt they would (even though my BP etc is really good).


That's because they are prescribed on overall cardiovascular risk. The cholesterol ratio is an input into the risk calculation, but is not the primary goal of treatment. For instance, if you had an adverse lipid profile, but low cardiovascular risk, there is little benefit from statins. Conversely, if you've had a heart attack (the highest risk category), then the cholesterol is irrelevant...Statins will make a substantial difference to cardiovascular events and mortality even with a good lipid profile.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 208 (view)
 
High Cholesterol ? Suggestions? Remedies?
Posted: 8/21/2015 5:31:34 AM

You (as many of us have done) will reflect upon opinions you have had over the years in the future about many things and think what a "dumb azz" you were in some regards in the past or at least issues you have been closed-minded about you will be open to changing your opinions.


Using the best evidence of the day has little to do with closed mindedness.

Otherwise, you can justify anything and everything on the basis that new evidence ''may" emerge to render previous truths to be untruths. False dichotomy.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 143 (view)
 
Instant Old Age
Posted: 8/20/2015 9:38:21 PM

Your posts speak to the emptiness of your head, your heart, and your life. I truly feel sorry for you.


Scrolling through your posts....it is a series of argumentum ad hominem, shill gambit, conspiracy theory and reasoning flaw. The echoes are in your head, not mine :)
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 206 (view)
 
High Cholesterol ? Suggestions? Remedies?
Posted: 8/20/2015 8:41:10 PM

HFX-RGB2 and Skyr make a cute couple. LOL.


Puerile quips like these are the domain of 5 yr olds, not the elderly if their faculties are intact.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 141 (view)
 
Instant Old Age
Posted: 8/20/2015 5:21:17 AM

I really could not care less about impressing you.


Then you shouldn't try so hard, because claiming to have a higher education, and actually having one, are two different things.

For instance, why pretend to have:
"received a degree in physics and engineering years before you were born"
when you do not believe in the scientific method?



You're a fool, and only another fool would seek your favor. When you have lived on this planet a few more years, maybe you will have something of value to contribute


If people ever pay for medical advice based on advancement in years, oh wise one, perhaps you can consider yourself of value to society.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 202 (view)
 
High Cholesterol ? Suggestions? Remedies?
Posted: 8/20/2015 4:20:28 AM

You cannot possibly know that as fact and you are more likely wrong than right
We overcome most ills by lifestyle, genetic predisposition or not.


That would depend on the 'ill', and the penetrance of the gene/s involved wouldn't it?

The ultimate genetic predisposition with complete penetrance is aging. Lifestyle may affect this to a small degree, but you're not going to get out it alive.


YOU name 3 people that knows HIS medical/family history that can state that as fact( that doesnt just parrot some old disproved statements/studies financed by big pharma..


What is being 'disproved' here? Being 75 in itself means nothing.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 139 (view)
 
Instant Old Age
Posted: 8/18/2015 3:02:52 PM

As a person who received a degree in physics and engineering years before you were born, I think I know a little bit about science.


I am not impressed with your education, perhaps it's time to relearn basic principles. Your primary argument is based on personal anecdote or conspiracy theory, and when it is pointed out to be rather weak, you counter with ad hominem fallacy.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 195 (view)
 
High Cholesterol ? Suggestions? Remedies?
Posted: 8/18/2015 2:24:47 PM

Skyr isn't a shill, he just believes that authorities know better than what common sense and experience would dictate.


And where does personal anecdote sit on the scale of evidence?

You claim to be a man of science....so tell us ;)
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 137 (view)
 
Instant Old Age
Posted: 8/16/2015 3:36:19 AM

It is obvious that Skyr and I come from two very different generations.


As demonstrated by the Flynn effect



Scientists and their studies can produce whatever result is most beneficial to their corporate sponsors.


If scientists can produce whatever result they like, presumably there is no such thing as science. Modern society is a figment of your imagination. Back to witchcraft



When you throw around statistics, and proclamations, quoting so called experts, it just shows me how empty your arguments are.



Now, being an 'educated' person, we'll make the assumption you understand what a quote is. So tell us- which expert I quoted and where. Go on...



Keep in mind that the overall agenda for the ruling elite, is population reduction (by any means necessary).


It's nice that you consider me part of the ruling elite, but your proposition is illogical. Statins are generally initiated in people at the end of their child bearing years, and has no clinically significant effect on human fertility.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 134 (view)
 
Instant Old Age
Posted: 8/15/2015 4:37:07 AM

No evidence statins will stop a heart attack (esp in women).


That is incorrect, particularly when applied to secondary prevention. Statins reduce both cardiovascular events and mortality, as demonstrated by multiple RCT's


The right diet reduces inflammation more than any drug.


That would depend on the drug and which part of the inflammatory cascade you are referring to. Biologics, for instance, are incredibly powerful suppressors of the inflammatory response. Far more than the wildest claims from pop diet promoters.

The hs-CRP is a non-specific cardiovascular risk marker, with limited practical use.


I see person after person gain weight esp in the belly and get" sloppy memories" taking statins all the time.
Some are now diabetic or pre diabetic.


Statins are associated with small increase in diabetes incidence at high doses, but the benefits generally outweigh the risk for secondary prevention and in high risk primary prevention.

For weight gain, that is an effect measured at a population level. If you can tell that someone put on the equivalent weight of a cup of water, you're either imagining things, or subject to confirmation bias.



Was surprised slightly myself at some of the info since I thought Alzheimer's was somewhat More genetic than it really is. About 3 % for women and 2 % for men in most studies.Some research less than 1% is found to be genetic


Not a useful guesstimate except for conditions with monogenetic influence and high penetrance. There are multiple gene markers associated with alzheimers. Most have yet to be identified, nor are they likely to have complete penetrance.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 132 (view)
 
Instant Old Age
Posted: 8/14/2015 5:45:15 PM

Actually Skyr, you're full of s##t. My primary argument was my personal experience with statins, before I began to research their deleterious effects. They are poisons, end of discussion, and no matter how brilliant you think you are, you're still stupid.


Everything is a "poison" in the right dose. Drink enough water and it will kill you :)

You experienced myalgia, which is expected in about 10% of patients. It's not a contraindication in itself, nor does it negate the benefit, particularly for secondary prevention.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 9 (view)
 
Rabies shots.
Posted: 8/7/2015 3:02:40 AM

Tetanus shot? Did Rover have a rusty grill?


A tetanus booster is standard treatment for any animal bite.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 48 (view)
 
HPV vaccine - a must-know for everyone
Posted: 7/28/2015 5:07:51 PM


Herpes simplex 1 is the virus that causes cold sores. You can get it from kissing, but it is incorrect to refer to it as "sexually transmitted", you can get the virus in childhood and it can lay dormant and you won't know you have it until it is "activated". Again, there is a lot of information on the subject.
Herpes simplex 2 is a sexually transited disease.
As far as the "moral" dilemma, that's just silly.


There is a big crossover- many cases of genital herpes are from HSV1, and likewise HSV 2 can also cause cold sores.

I direct people to this site if they Q's about herpes: http://herpes.org.nz/
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 47 (view)
 
HPV vaccine - a must-know for everyone
Posted: 7/28/2015 5:02:58 PM

I was doing some research today because I'm still undecided about having my 15 year old get the vaccination. It's surprising how much information here (from 6 or so years ago) is now proven incorrect (like one person thinking they were vaccinated for life) ...


I suggest it's not so much information, as misinformation.

Especially this:



So far, it looks like the vaccination lasts 5 years at best, and IF you get the vaccination after you've contracted even ONE strand of HPV your risk of getting cervical cancer actually INCREASES 44%.

Also, IF you've contracted even one strand before getting the vaccination the Gardasil vaccination is ineffective ... it does nothing.

That was my understanding of the information, but it was just one report I read


Try this instead:
http://www.immune.org.nz/sites/default/files/resources/DiseaseHpvImac20150508V01Final_0.pdf
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 67 (view)
 
what would the world be like today if only one race existed
Posted: 7/14/2015 5:02:43 PM

I don't think that's entirely accurate. So far, we think that our origins were in Africa, generally speaking. But I haven't understood that to mean "black". Back then, "black", or even "African", didn't mean the same as we mean it today.


Race is a social concept, not a biological one. Certain polymorphisms are more common in different human populations, but they don't in themselves identify a 'race'.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 28 (view)
 
That Evil Gluten
Posted: 7/14/2015 4:38:49 AM



1) Wheat germ agglutinin can enter the bloodstream and hitch a ride to other organs to places like your knees, hips, skin, thyroid gland, eyes, airways and sinuses, resulting in inflammation in those organs: arthritis, rashes, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, uveitis, asthma and sinus congestion.


The equivalent of cutting and pasting a selection of random diseases and blaming it on pink flamingoes.



2) Gliadin likewise enters the bloodstream and triggers immune phenomena via its “molecular mimicry” effect, its capacity to closely mimic the structure of many human proteins, triggering autoimmune responses: rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, polymyositis, neuropathies, etc.


Molecular mimicry merely describes autoimmune phenomena, it does not mean that we will have antibody cross reactivity between epitopes.



3) Because the disrupted intestinal lining now acts as a two-way path, water can leak into the intestinal tract, resulting in diarrhea and bowel urgency. In fact, this effect of the gliadin protein has been likened to the effect of cholera toxin that results in intractable watery diarrhea.


That only applies to someone with coeliac disease.



Multi-organ inflammation, autoimmunity, and watery bowels: You can see why I often call modern wheat “a perfect chronic poison.” It is as if this thing was specifically designed for maximum damage, an intestinal jihad perpetrated on us by agribusiness mujahideen.


A good dose of hyperbole and conjecture to sell pop-diets to the worried well. Multi organ inflammation? Really?
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 19 (view)
 
That Evil Gluten
Posted: 7/10/2015 3:01:47 PM

I don't know anything about water and insulin sensitivity, but I know water isn't a high energy food. Though I suppose if you never consume any water, you won't have problems with weight, insulin or anything else., so in that way you are right


Perhaps I should have said- it doesn't follow that water has anything to do with insulin sensitivity, any more than gluten, as far as we know.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 17 (view)
 
That Evil Gluten
Posted: 7/10/2015 4:00:56 AM

Abstract
RESULTS:
It has been demonstrated that patients suffering from NCGS are a heterogeneous group, composed of several subgroups, each characterized by different pathogenesis, clinical history, and, probably, clinical course. NCGS diagnosis can be reached only by excluding CD and WA.
.


It's a literature review with a pretty loose inclusion criteria. The only way to identify NCGS as an entity is with a double blind placebo controlled food challenge, not working backwards from the clinical history.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 16 (view)
 
That Evil Gluten
Posted: 7/10/2015 3:20:59 AM

Gluten is a source of high energy foods, reducing one's calorie count nearly always increases insulin sensitivity, as does exercise.


So is water. It doesn't follow that reducing water intake will necessarily do anything for insulin sensitivity.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 8 (view)
 
That Evil Gluten
Posted: 7/9/2015 6:09:26 AM

Gluten, insulin spiking processed foods and sugar contribute to disease.
Dementia is one.

May want to think about type 3 diabetes which is a term DRs are using now, not just "quacks'


This is what I was referring to in regard to the hypothetical claims made by quacktitioners. Take a little bit of science, extrapolate to a pre-determined outcome, and use it to sell the latest pop-diet book.

What on earth does gluten have to do with the insulin physiology of the brain and dementia? Evidence please, not conjecture.


A recent large study in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that people with diagnosed, undiagnosed, and “latent” celiac disease or gluten sensitivity had a higher risk of death, mostly from heart disease and cancer. (i)

This study looked at almost 30,000 patients from 1969 to 2008 and examined deaths in three groups: Those with full-blown celiac disease, those with inflammation of their intestine but not full-blown celiac disease, and those with latent celiac disease or gluten sensitivity (elevated gluten antibodies but negative intestinal biopsy).

Findings were dramatic. There was a 39 percent increased risk of death in those with celiac disease, not as common as inflammation/sensitivity, 72 percent increased risk in those with JUST gut inflammation related to gluten, and 35 percent increased risk in those with gluten sensitivity but no celiac disease.

Research backs you don’t have to have full-blown celiac disease with a positive intestinal biopsy (which is what conventional thinking tells us) to have serious health problems and complications–even death–from eating gluten.

Yet an estimated 99 percent of people who have a problem with eating gluten don’t even know it. They think their health or symptoms is caused by something else, blaming age or hormonal issues else–not gluten sensitivity, which is 100 percent curable.


Presumably you are referring to the Swedish cohort study. Allowing for the fact there are limitations with case-controls (*only as good as the ability to match confounding variables), the results for the antibody positive, but biopsy negative group, shows an increase hazard ratio only in the first 5yrs post follow-up period. There is no statistical significance in mortality in this group at > 5yr post-follow up.

If you think about it...who would get bloods done for coeliac serology and a SB biopsy? People who have abdominal symptoms (eg pain/weight loss/bloating/altered bowel habit), because it's not the sort of thing you do for fun. These are the same symptoms as a range of serious diseases, including bowel and other malignancy. What are the chances they had positive antibodies, but died of something completely unrelated to coeliac disease? Pretty good I would say, especially in the first year post-follow up (hazard ratio 1.81; 95%CI 1.18-2.76)

Even IF having positive coeliac (anti-TTG/EMA/gliadin) antibodies, was a CAUSE of increased mortality, the only recommendation that can be made is to avoid gluten if you have these antibodies. It does not apply to the general population (which presumably include the controls used in the study).
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 17 (view)
 
Is a Calorie Really a Calorie?
Posted: 7/9/2015 4:52:24 AM

The ave man/woman selling you insurance behind a desk in the USA will get fat, esp in the belly , will have higher inflammation in the body, more cancer risks and more cravings for ALL carbs/sugars/grains if they eat wheat, esp whole wheat. Your insulin stays up longer with whole wheat bread than white processed bread.
The longer the blood sugar stays up the worse it is for us.


Plenty of conjecture, short on evidence.

The hs-CRP is a non specific secondary biomarker. You're extrapolating, presumably, what a particular food may or may not do to the hs-CRP, to determine cancer risk. Who cares what the hs-CRP is? What is the evidence that wheat ACTUALLY causes cancer?

As for insulin, you are suggesting that whole wheat results in prolonged insulin elevation, which leads to prolonged hyperglycemia? That makes no sense.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 16 (view)
 
Is a Calorie Really a Calorie?
Posted: 7/9/2015 4:03:15 AM

As I understand it, multi-grain bread is the healthy bread. But looking at the ingredients of whole wheat vs. White, I'm not sure there is much of a difference between the breads on the glycemic scale other than wheat bread has significantly more fiber, and that is a good thing


The glycaemic index was never developed as a healthy/ unhealthy food index. It has some utility in diabetics, but exercise and weight loss are more effective lifestyle measures for improving glycaemic control. Cereal fibre is inversely associated with diabetes risk in cohort studies.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 10 (view)
 
Is a Calorie Really a Calorie?
Posted: 7/7/2015 9:17:50 PM

Which is where most people fail to understand that the human body is not a closed system, thus you can not apply The first law of thermodynamics.


The first law of thermodynamics still applies, it's just not very precise because the closed system is not the human being, it's the environment with the human being.

Short of combusting someone with their food and urine/faeces/gases in a bomb calorimeter, we rely on the atwater calculations to give us an idea of metabolisable energy.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 9 (view)
 
Is a Calorie Really a Calorie?
Posted: 7/7/2015 8:54:46 PM

Peppermint has put a heck of a lot more effort into reading the science than I have. . . but she essentially recommends low carbohydrate diets and none to little wheat based products. Everything I read indicates wheat is good for us, not to mention the fiber that helps regulate our digestive systems.


By which you mean low level evidence and a good dose of conjecture, as is common with quacktitioners?

Any 'diet', (as in controlled food intake), will lead to weight loss. Low carb often results in more rapid weight loss in the short term (6m), but in the longer term is no more or less effective than low fat and other calorie restricted diets. As for ketogenic diets- about the only clinical indication currently is paediatric epilepsy, although it is can be an adjunct in the treatment of diabetes.

Most of the so called wheat or gluten intolerant people, who do not have coeliac disease, are self diagnosed, or use non-specific antibody tests which are meaningless in isolation. We don't know if a disease such as Non-coeliac gluten sensitivity exists as a discrete entity, because there is a limited number of double blind placebo controlled food challanges, and much of it was looking at irritable bowel syndrome.
 skyr
Joined: 3/30/2008
Msg: 38 (view)
 
Set point
Posted: 6/23/2015 5:02:42 PM

If you run a caloric deficit, under consume, you MUST lose weight.

Set point is a rallying point for overweight, obese defeatists.


The first law of thermodynamics still applies, but it doesn't explain what drives our energy consumption and expenditure. If it was all under concious (frontal lobe) control, no one would be fat. But you're fighting your mid-brain, which is where the idea of set points come in.



Certainly the set point theory about losing no more than 10% of your body weight in a 6 month period, then waiting few months would explain why so many more rigid / crash diets all eventually fail.


I think it's presumptive to assume that is why crash diet fail. If there is a biological 'set point', it doesn't automatically follow that rapidity of deviation is going to cause failure or success. What would be important is whether this phyisological set point can be altered by what we do. For instance,if you look at people when they first develop anorexia nervosa, they go from slightly overweight, to rapidly underweight, and then maintain this. I wonder if rapid starvation itself alters the physiological set point.
 
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