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 Author Thread: I am suicidal
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 2 (view)
 
I am suicidal
Posted: 5/18/2018 6:59:11 PM
Is it because you can't face the prospect of enduring watching the Royal Wedding on TV?
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 26 (view)
 
why do we try so hard to survive?
Posted: 3/15/2015 3:23:21 PM
Animals have a a basic instinct to survive because natural selection tends to preserve animals with such a genetically determined trait at a differentially greater rate than animals lacking the trait. For instance, if an animal bore a gene that inclined it to approach predators instead of striving to escape, then the chances are that, like its hosts, the gene would not survive.

Why people carry on the race by having children is similarly explained. Genes for horniness are favoured by natural selection, because horny individuals will tend to leave more offspring than the non-hornily inclined, and the offspring will most likely possess and transmit the horniness gene to future generations.
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 120 (view)
 
An Atheism Thread For the Rest of US
Posted: 5/9/2013 2:14:17 PM
The new most ignorant video on YouTube. Religious folks being able to get away with being religious by claiming they aren't.


Watched the video. The guy's approach seemed consistent with the popular I'm not religious. I have a personal relationship with Jesus Christ line used by conservative Christians. It's some kind of' exclusivity of truth claiming religion=bad, Jesus=good faith proclamation type thing in a rap poetry style with sympathetic musical accompaniment.
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 27 (view)
 
Another star arrested
Posted: 5/7/2013 9:36:35 AM
This succession of popular TV celebrity arrests on suspected sexual offence charges is causing me to wonder where it will all end and who will be next. It's bad enough that pillar of the establishment household names like Ken Barlow, Stuart Hall, Rolf Harris and Jimmy Tarbuck have fallen under the baleful eye of police scrutiny, but is this the thin end of the wedge? Who will be next, and how will it affect the future perception of clean, wholesome family entertainment in the public mind? God forbid, but is it feasible that Sooty and Sweep's reputations may be next on the chopping block, or even Basil Brush's? I know they're just puppets but they do have human hands up them, so I've been told. I always had my doubts about Itsy and Bitsy, those two puppet spiders who arguably used to "grope" Susan Stranks on ITV's Magpie children's magazine programme.
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 43 (view)
 
gloryhole
Posted: 1/20/2013 1:33:04 PM
What if there was someone with a pair of industrial grade bolt cutters on the other side (eyes smarting emoticon).
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 16 (view)
 
R.E.M. Split..
Posted: 9/22/2011 7:34:52 AM
I liked "Automatic For The People," and "Out of Time," with the Kate Pierson vocally assisted "Shiny Happy People." Their first album "Murmur" was also dead good. Other works are okay but haven't tickled my musical fancy to the same degree. It seems that most pop groups have their period of maximum creativity before settling into a long slow heat death, a bit like the universe itself. Maybe announcing a definite cut-off point makes the process seem less dragged out. Also, it may boost sales of nostaligic retrospective material, or pave the way for a lucrative reunion tour and album when they're all approaching 103 years of age, like the Police did---well the tour anyway.

That's made me think of bands least likely to ever reform in this way, prime examples being The Smiths and The Jam.. (emoticon denoting peaceful retirement to rock heaven)
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 4 (view)
 
What's your favorite Amy Winehouse song?
Posted: 8/8/2011 6:28:34 PM
"Love Is A Losing Game" is my fave and sounds like something Stevie Wonder might have written in his best quality 1970's period. What a talented young lady and a terrible waste.
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 2 (view)
 
Why is there something instead of nothing?
Posted: 10/5/2010 6:46:30 PM
Is the impenetrable mystery of why stuff exists even sure to be the right question? Would it not be equally pertinent to ask why stuff shouldn't exist?

..after all we're in no position to judge these things and anyway, it's impossible to imagine a state of complete nothingness without time or space or existence itself.
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 65 (view)
 
Is there Life on other Planets?
Posted: 2/28/2010 7:12:46 AM
My intuitive feeling based on the sheer mind boggling abundance of stars in the universe and the knowledge that some of them have planetary systems, is that alien life will exist somewhere, but with a sample size for evidence of life's existence of but one example so far, namely the earth, we are reduced to tantalising speculation.

If life could be found in at least one other place apart from the earth, this would revolutionise ideas about how common or rare life is in the universe. One hopes that Nasa will continue to explore Mars for signs of existing or extinct life, and also aim to explore the depths of Jupiter's moon, Europa, and Saturn's moon Enceladus, both of which are thought to have large, subterranean oceans warmed by the geothermal heat generated by their interiors flexing under the gravitational stresses induced by their parent planets.

Studies of hydrothermal vents on earth have revealed that organisms can thrive in this kind of environment without access to sunlight.

Quote from the OP:


Well what do you think?
As a christian i don't believe there is life on other planets for the simple reason that Jesus came to EARTH and died for us on THIS planet, not on Mars. If there was to be other life "out there" then there would have to be another Jesus but the bible says "God so loved the world that he gave his ONLY Son that who so believeth shall not perish but have everlasting life" so it would be imposible!!!!
What do you think?
Come on chalenge my theory (or Gods truth?) xxxxxxx


As an atheist, I think the story of Jesus coming to earth and dying for our sins is rooted in an anthropomorphised view of reality where concerns about the conduct of human moral behaviour as manifested through in group prosociality has been magnified into an unhealthy fetish.

I therefore think that religious mythology is more about human psychology than God/s existing as an external reality, and has no bearing on questions about the existence of alien life.
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 13 (view)
 
Nidal Hasan Shoots & Kills 12 US Soldiers
Posted: 11/6/2009 5:53:11 AM
It would be interesting to know the motives behind Major Hasan's behaviour if he survives his injuries. Was this a terrorist attack by a man who sympathised with radical Islam, or was he just therapeutically letting off steam in traditional American fashion by using his right to bear arms as a means of self expression?

The latter instance happens often in the US, with schools and healthcare centres the favourite target, and the protagonists are never Muslim, so I hope this man's actions don't spark a wave of anti-Muslim hysteria with attacks been made by hysterical fear crazed rednecks on law abiding Muslim citizens.
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 14 (view)
 
favorite beatles song
Posted: 10/27/2009 6:01:58 PM
Almost everything by the Beatles is top notch, but the Rubber Soul/Revolver period has to be my favourite, for how their music became more sophisticated and varied, taking things far beyond the usual range of generic Boy/Girl relationship themes. These albums are indispensable to the enthusiast, but the two non-album singles from this era, Paperback Writer/ Rain and Day Tripper/ We Can Work It Out demonstrate the expanded creative horizons to startling perfection in two minute, radio friendly form. Day Tripper must have one of the most organic and perfectly formed riffs ever, and lyrics that hint at the perils of substance abuse. (at least that's how I read 'em) ...while Paperback Writer features a multitracked chorus that sounds amazing played loud, an unusual, clever and contemporary lyrical theme, plus another pungent hard rock riff. As if this isn't enough, the B side of this single happens to be one of the best flipsides ever-- Lennon's Rain, a droning paean to the popular British pastime of moaning about the weather, and an early foray into psychedelia with massed guitars, sinuous bass, majestic drumming and backwards playing vocals on the outro.

If compelled to narrow it down to one song, I would go for Paperback Writer.
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 51 (view)
 
What would the world be like if there were no religion?
Posted: 8/15/2009 7:08:48 AM
In order for there to have been no religion throughout humanity's evolution, perhaps we would need to have been different creatures with more primitive, less imaginative brains. This might not have been such a good thing, 'cause besides not inventing religion we wouldn't have had the capacity to perform lots of other imaginative feats. Maybe there'd be no written or spoken language and no art. That means no Supper at Emmaus by Caravaggio, or Ceiling of the Sistine Chapel by Michelangelo and no The Last Supper by Da Vinci, but also maybe no works by Van Gogh, Jackson Pollock or Mark Rothko either.

The English landscape obviously wouldn't be punctuated with beautiful churches with their spires pointing rocket-like towards the sky, foreshadowing the Space Age. One thinks of a local church at Laughton en le Morthern that was built in the 15th century and appears in its shape and skyward pointing stance to foreshadow Thunderbird 3 on the launchpad, a full five hundred years before Gerry Anderson would be born. Hmm..maybe there'd be no Thunderbirds, no NASA, no Moon Landings, no robotic exploration of the Saturn and Jupiter and their moon systems, or the surface of Mars. Boring..

Back on terra firma, There'd obviously be no Carry On Vicar, Father Ted or Vicar of Dibley but maybe if humans had been deprived of that all important religion producing creative gene complex, there'd be no telly at all. Imagine that! No BBC News 24, Star Trek, televised Wimbledon Tennis Championships or Tour de France every year, or wildlife documentaries presented by David Attenbrough, including that good one about evolution he made this year as part of the beebs Darwin Season to mark the 200th anniversary of the great Englishman's birth.

Yeah, in fact without the imaginative genes that produced religion, maybe humans wouldn't have had the capacity to form ever more accurate ideas about the way that things really work in the universe, and there would be no theories from Newton, Darwin and Einstein.

I've seen it before on Doctor Who where the Doc, suitably accompanied by a glamorous assistant goes back and alters a fact of history and it resultantly has dire consequences for the "Space Time Continuum", whatever that is. Don't ask me what, but suffice to say that it is heavy shit that causes things to go wrong if messed with, and I think that if the gene complex in humans that gave 'em the propensity to develop religious beliefs was magically excised or altered at the outset, we might be living in a very different world - in a bad way.

Leave well alone I say..
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 2 (view)
 
The Destiny of Judas Iscariot
Posted: 8/14/2009 11:04:59 AM
I think its a good topic and raises questions of did Judas possess freewill or was he a programmed automaton working to fulfil the purported Messiah's predetermined plan. There are places in the Bible where the text suggests that God is manipulating people and denying them freewill, as in the story of Pharoah's heart being hardened against Moses' requests for him to release the Israelites from bondage. In this instance, God appears to repeatedly interfere with the Pharoah's freewill in order that he can show off by staging a series of ever more impressive stunts that culminate in his killing all the first born in Egypt.

It all seems a bit cruel and unnecessary to me, but then I'm of an Atheistic and Humanistic persuasion.


"The one who has dipped his hand into the bowl with me will betray me. 24The Son of Man will go just as it is written about him. But woe to that man who betrays the Son of Man! It would be better for him if he had not been born."


This bit is also slightly suspect. One would expect that if Jesus planned on being sacrificed from the outset, that he would appreciate the part that Judas played, or at least follow his own teachings and be forgiving about it.
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 3 (view)
 
Sympathy for the Devil ?
Posted: 6/15/2009 7:07:15 PM
In my opinion, the devil could never walk into a church and get baptised, as anyone who has seen a decent vampire film could tell you. Vampires must be a lot less evil than Satan, yet in those films, holy water burns them and makes 'em bubble up like toasted cheese..

I imagine something similar happening to Satan, only worse. Maybe it would even be like mixing matter and anti matter.

>>Poof<< !!!

Jus' sayin...
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 4 (view)
 
The Last Question
Posted: 5/24/2009 3:28:18 PM
The word, "Multivac" reminds me of a cylinder vacuum cleaner I bought in 1988. It has had a couple of replacement motors in its time, but the most recent one has lasted for yonks.

Mind you, I only use it to vacuum the garage these days..
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 2 (view)
 
The Last Question
Posted: 5/22/2009 3:07:47 PM
I read the story, but in the initial scroll down to see how long it was, caught the striking closing sentence, which slightly marred the effect.

The concept of humans representing a germ of self awareness in the universe that will eventually reach godlike status is an appealing one, and the idea of humans colonising the universe was good, but after an earlier reading of a thread on the Science/ Philosophy forum about the human body adapting to living on planets with reduced gravity and the problems of their then returning to Earth with weakened musculature and reduced bone mass, I wonder if long distance manned space travel will ever be viable.

A more likely scenario, which I'm sure must have been covered in the world of sci-fi literature (thinks The Terminator), is that humans will create sentient machines that lack our physical weaknesses and can boldly go where we cannot. This is already happening, minus the sentience, in a tentative way with the robot Mars landers.

Will it one day be possible for us to create such spacefaring machines, maybe in our own image, and download our human consciousness into them? This feat alone would be slightly Godlike, although not as impressive as reversing the heat death of the universe..
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 7 (view)
 
The Ethics of Necrophilia.
Posted: 5/12/2009 7:41:40 PM
Yes.. I feel led down a rather dark and dreary trail.. where does it all lead Clarence?

And have you thought of a career as a writer? Good stuff....


Thanks Sass, (head swells appreciably) but not everyone agrees, apparently.

I received a standard impersonal "Final Warning" message yesterday from the POF High Command, presenting a multiple choice menu outlining various offences that each constitute an infringement of posting rules. I decided, perhaps self deludingly to select a violation that read..

5. Age - if we have reasons to believe you are under 18 years of age, your account will be deleted.

I'm assuming someone has taken a long hard look at my profile picture and decided that I'm possibly nowhere near 51 years of age, but are unusually allowing the accused a bit of extra time in which to grow older..

This could be seen as a compliment really, but late last night I was feeling a bit like Kafka's persecuted Josef K, and musing sadly on the obliquely specified charge, as I wandered down to the local "Rhythm and Booze" in order to replenish my dwindling stocks of Hobgoblin Ale. (in bottles, not cans)

Taking a shortcut down a ginnel to avoid some aggressive looking teenagers, I emerged onto Chestnut Grove where Horace lives, and was immediately confronted by a large commotion going on in the distance, seemingly in the vicinity of Horace's house, with several police cars in attendance, displaying more flashing lights than a Christmas Tree.

As I approached the disturbance, it became evident that there was lots of that blue and white, policey looking tickertape material cordoning off the area to pedestrians. Awkward really, 'cause it would mean a long walk back up the road to access "Rhythm and Booze" via Oak Road, Sycamore Road and Hawthorne Crescent, and possibly failing to make it before the shop closing time of 10pm.

I reluctantly turned to press on with my re-directed journey, but not before noticing the big tent that the cops had erected in Horace's front garden. Very odd, that. It made me wonder if someone had found an unexploded bomb or something..
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 4 (view)
 
The Ethics of Necrophilia.
Posted: 5/11/2009 2:16:13 PM
The Wikipedia articles are disturbing but grimly fascinating. I didn't know about the connection between necrophilia and serial killers. I must say, Horace has never given any indication of being one of those. His first wife did die in questionable circumstances, but the police investigation put it down to her foolishly trying to balance an electric fire on the edge of the bath. As far as I have gathered from his recollections, his other four wives left him and emigrated after divorces due to "irreconcilable differences".

Horace is actually a good friend and a very helpful guy. When my dog died, he insisted on saving me the distress of disposing of the corpse by doing the job himself. He even took Rover back to his place and buried him in his own garden. That was really thoughtful of him.

He's also very good if I want any chickens for the freezer. His brother works at a chicken processing plant, and I have only to say the word and Horace will procure several freshly prepared ones at a reduced price from his brother. He always seems very enthusiastic to help with this favour.

So I would say that on balance, he is very unlikely to be a serial killer, although I may broach the subject with him, when next we meet.



By doing in a job were he is required to respect the body and the family members wishes he is doing several things wrong. Well he would be if this were a true story. I for one don't think it is. Not that this does not happen, but putting out info on a forum about a friend of yours could end him up in the big house, so more likely just a troll post, at least I hope.


That's a cynical smear. Trollery indeed! ..and I wouldn't dream of exposing Brian to the possible attention of the boys in blue by publishing his real name..
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 1 (view)
 
The Ethics of Necrophilia.
Posted: 5/10/2009 5:31:27 PM
My friend Horace works for an undertakers, (known as a funeral home on the other side of the pond). He often regales me with tales of how he sometimes works late into the night on overtime sessions, and uses these quiet times to take advantage of the occasional availability of young, attractive deceased ladies. According to Horace, if his libidinous desires are aroused by a particularly attractive female corpse, and there's no-one around to witness his activities, he satisfies himself by re-heating it on a radiator and having his wicked way.

I've argued with Horace long and hard that his behaviour is unethical, and would probably attract criminal prosecution if the authorities were ever to catch up with him, to say nothing of the possible implications for his immortal soul if certain religious tomes turn out to be correct and there is a time of eternal punishment in the afterlife.

Where do the forumites think Horace's nocturnal activities rank on a scale of wrongdoing; are there scriptural verses from any belief system that specifically proscribe necrophilia, and in your opinion, is it as ethically questionable as the violation of a living person?
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 3 (view)
 
Wicca
Posted: 4/26/2009 7:02:14 PM
I dunno anything about Wicca but I've seen a few Harry Potter films and there's a spell that he uses where he waves his wand and goes, "Wingardium Leviosa!"

I think it's used to levitate objects.
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 15 (view)
 
Your case for/against God.
Posted: 4/15/2009 12:58:42 PM
^^^^^ I find the whole idea of God making man "in his own image" illogical. Does this mean that God is an entity that shares our advanced big brained upright ape bodyplan, but with puzzlingly extreme creative powers? If so, did he also share our history of evolution from more primitive forms?

More questions than answers. I would be totally okay with God turning out to actually exist, especially if he does have a friendly and benign nature, but I think scepticism is advisable, in the absence of all the relevant data. God's true nature may differ disastrously from how he is envisaged by the various Earthly religions - he could be something entirely different. He might even be totally evil, and us relatively decent humans have evolved accidentally in a far flung corner of the universe that has so far escaped his baleful eye. It could be that when his Angelic minions perform their regular 300,000 yearly census of the universe, we'll be discovered and quietly euthanised to make space for another of the Mainman's absorbing experiments with giant reptiles.

Maybe we should seek to advance militarily to the extent that we are able to put up a fight..
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 7 (view)
 
Your case for/against God.
Posted: 4/13/2009 9:35:45 PM
Is God any more likely to exist than the Loch Ness Monster, Bigfoot or the Yeti? I don't know, but wouldn't go down the road of belief in any of them without some very compelling evidence.. and no - footprints or dung would not suffice.

In the case of God, I would be very interested to know what he looks like, cause I think it would most prob'ly be unlike any of our preconceptions that are based on religious books and suchlike. My wild guess is that he might be just a big eye with all veins surrounding it like in the film "The Trollenberg Terror" that I remember watching on telly in the early sixties with my brother.

The film probably looks very tame by modern standards but it fired our youthful imaginations...
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 81 (view)
 
worst films
Posted: 4/8/2009 10:59:11 AM
I hated the remake of "The Day The Earth Stood Still". It woulda been merciful if time had stood still throughout the movie to make it more bearable..
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 13 (view)
 
Who's got crystal balls ?
Posted: 4/8/2009 9:13:18 AM
Electric cars are a lousy concept - the electricity still comes from a fuel burning or nuclear powerstation.

That is true at the moment, but if the electricity came from renewable sources, it would no longer be the case.
Hydrogen cells are the way forward...cars along the principle of the (still shockingly expensive) Honda FCX Clarity.

Electrical power is required to separate hydrogen from oxygen in order to supply hydrogen fuel cells, so this would have to come from a renewable source in order to make the technology truly eco-neutral.
I think, anyway. Haven't done a huge amount of research on the FCX and for all I know the production of hydrogen is as harmful as electricity production...but a car that only farts water vapour and has the range of a conventional car (unlike all those 100-200mile electric wastes of space) has to be a step in the right direction, surely.

I think the Tesla has something like a 220 mile range, which would be enough to transport me to work and the local Asda for a coupla weeks between refills.

..and if quick recharge batteries or replacement stations become available in future..
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 11 (view)
 
Who's got crystal balls ?
Posted: 4/8/2009 6:47:23 AM
Quote from Barry:

5 years. Professor Stephen Chu discovers the secret to harnessing the energy of the sun and gives us an new unlimited energy source called Starlight that will come to replace electricity. Cost to the user will be pennies per year if anything at all.


There's an article in the latest issue of New Scientist mag arguing that most forms of power generation, even nuclear, have the unwanted effect of adding heat to the environment, and that the real way forward is to develop renewable sources like solar and wind power to make use of the thousands of terrawats of free energy that rains down on the Earth daily. Sounds sensible to me, given that fossil fuels are really concentrated supplies of solar energy that have been accumulated over time.

So maybe the future of power generation will be something like vast solar farms situated equatorially and wired around the planet, cutting out the middleman and harnessing the sun directly for all our needs.

Electric cars look like a viable future prospect and already exists in the too expensive form of the high performance Tesla roadster...and didn't I read somewhere about a new battery design that will reduce recharging time to minutes instead of hours?
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 15 (view)
 
Define Middle age
Posted: 4/6/2009 1:01:29 PM
I think you're middle aged when you can remember Denis Norden reciting a different humorous definition of when you're middle aged every week on that old TV programme, whatever it was..
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 20 (view)
 
pollocks!!!
Posted: 4/6/2009 12:57:14 PM
I have no problem with asking for Pollocks but would suggest the name "Jacksons" as a better substitute than "Colin", sounding as it does like****ey rhyming slang for the famous American abstract artist.
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 17 (view)
 
Mecca mosques 'wrongly aligned'
Posted: 4/6/2009 12:52:43 PM
I'm sure the builders of British mosques will have obviated any misalignment problem through the use of compasses and GPS.

Perhaps the Saudis could build large dished reflectors outside their misaligned home built mosques to gather together the prayers and accurately refocus them on Mecca?
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 10 (view)
 
Did Eastenders handle the Danielle story well or get in wrong killing her off?
Posted: 4/6/2009 12:37:53 PM
Oh dear. I was just half listening to the latest episode whilst plonking away at the puter and heard Peggy Mitchell making this request of her potato headed son:

"There's just one thing I'd like you to do for me Phil"..

"What's that then?"

"Kill "im".

BISH BISH BISH BOSH BOSH BUGGA BUGGA!!!!! (approximation of thunderous synthesised drumbeat outro)

Now I don't agree with that. You can't just kill people, fer flipsake!
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 3 (view)
 
favourite fleetwood mac record?
Posted: 4/5/2009 9:29:27 AM
I appreciate nearly every incarnation of Fleetwood Mac, starting at the Peter Green driven blues band with the pristine pop sensibility that produced masterworks like the album Then Play On and pristine pop songs like Albatross, Black Magic Woman, Man of the World and the exquisite, Dragonfly. (this track written by youthful second guitarist Danny Kirwan, whose flame burned bright but briefly)

The Kirwan/ Spencer driven period produced the album, Kiln House with its mixture of Jeremy Spencer's rock "n" roll pastiches and Kirwan's multi layered guitar workouts. Standouts are Kirwan's "Tell Me All the Things You Do" and the instrumental "Earl Grey"

After this, the album, Future Games saw the addition of Bob Welch and Christine McVie, both of whom contribute fine songs, whilst Danny Kirwan gives us the languid, haunting "Woman of a Thousand Years" and "Sands of Time".

Bare Trees follows, and features more Kirwan magic in Child of Mine, Sunny Side of Heaven and the title track.

I think it was after this album that Kirwan's drunken behaviour became unmanageable and he was sacked after fighting with another band member.

Shame. The band went on to experience a new wave of stellar success with the addition of the brilliant and talented Stevie Nicks and Lindsay Buckingham, but I have a special soft spot for the original line-up and particularly the period following this when Danny Kirwan was still in the band.
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 8 (view)
 
Did Eastenders handle the Danielle story well or get in wrong killing her off?
Posted: 4/5/2009 7:53:15 AM
I've just watched the Danielle death story again on the Omnibus edition and it was even more upsetting than the first occasion. I'm now wondering if the Eastenders writers could be pressured by public opinion to make all of the recent storyline into a dream of one of the other characters, from which he/ she will wake up in a future episode to find none of it really took place. I believe this once happened in Dallas. As an alternative scenario, perhaps the dead Danielle could turn out to be one of a pair of identical twins, or maybe a clone of the original, created by a deranged scientist at the time of birth. Perhaps at Danielle's funeral, the original Danielle (played by the same actress but a bit less drippy) could turn up among the mourners, seeking her mum and also looking to avenge the clone that stole her identity and left her chained to a radiator in a bedsit 9 months ago.

Just a coupla random ideas..whaddja think?

Would it be worth calling the BBC's Action Line for viewers affected by issues in the story and making suggestions?
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 6 (view)
 
Did Eastenders handle the Danielle story well or get in wrong killing her off?
Posted: 4/2/2009 6:06:39 PM
That's fair enough, but the writers have a responsibility of attracting viewers, not driving them away as we see happening from the various comments by posters on this thread saying they will give the show a miss in future. The long drawn out tedium of the "when will she reveal her true identity" storyline could have been mitigated by a positive conclusion.
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 5 (view)
 
Did Eastenders handle the Danielle story well or get in wrong killing her off?
Posted: 4/2/2009 5:49:08 PM
The tragic ending compounded the misery of a tedious long running storyline that demanded and deserved a positive resolution, and denied the viewer from enjoying further drama as Ronnie and Danielle developed their relationship. I think the writers seriously failed to deliver in this instance, and should pay the price.

Let the cruelty meted out on the characters and the viewer be extended to the writing team.
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 4 (view)
 
Did Eastenders handle the Danielle story well or get in wrong killing her off?
Posted: 4/2/2009 4:37:49 PM
I agree with you Hams. The writers totally squandered the opportunity of producing something positive in preference to the gloomiest possible option. I know it's only an ongoing soap and storyline quality is variable, but I would put this one down as a total duffer, and deserving of some redundancies among the writers.
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 56 (view)
 
BBC is it worth the money? Would you like to see it go to save on license fees?
Posted: 4/2/2009 4:22:47 PM
I would be sorry to see the licence fee go. The BBC is renowed around the world for the quality of it's news service, it's investigative documentaries and for the quality of all it's products. It is the envy of the world. It's independance and it's word counts for something.


I'm inclined to agree with Mr Obama here. The BBC's news service is a beacon of impartiality and reason that is the envy of the whole world, and should be encouraged in the interests of persuading other institutions to strive for similar high standards.


I just had the misfortune to walk past the living room and have my eyes and ears assailed by 15sec of the abysmal tripe that is EastEnders, and it only reinforced my opinion.


Hmm. I watched "Eastenders" earlier to see how the writers had decided to conclude a storyline that has dragged on for months, in which drippy adopted child, Danielle finally reveals her true identity to her real mother, Ronnie.

What a total anti-climax. No sooner had the troubled teen been accepted as the long lost sprog that she ended her life as roadkill beneath the wheels of scheming toe-rag, Janine Butcher.

I think the writers concerned should be lashed until they drop, before being introduced to the sobering situation of life in the dole queue, but I would still support the BBC for the quality of its other stuff. The recent "Darwin Season" comes to mind as a quality example.
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 12 (view)
 
Can God be challenged conversationally?
Posted: 3/31/2009 3:28:07 PM
It was once written in graffiti on walls across Britain in the 1960's that "Clapton is God".

I s'pose you could have a stimulating conversation with Eric Clapton about his influences and ask him why the "Blind Faith" album sleeve bears a picture of a naked eleven year old holding a model jet plane..
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 6 (view)
 
Keeping Kosher
Posted: 3/31/2009 7:14:54 AM
It must be great to be in a faith that has lots of complicated rules about what you can and can't eat. I imagine it makes the religion and its practitioners feel very authentic, special and exclusive.

Ive just had a beef sandwich that, according to the pack contained beef, salt, stabilisers (Tri and Polyphosphates) and was made with 102g of beef per 100g finished product.

Oh, and it was "packaged in a protective atmosphere".

That lot sounds quite complex really. I won't even go into what the spread contained but it was "Bertolli" and is 21% olive oil apparently.
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 7 (view)
 
annie lennox
Posted: 3/28/2009 5:39:40 PM
Her voice is holding up very well, but I preferred her poppy singles with the Eurythmics rather than the protracted gospel grind type stuff that she does now. It just comes over as sweaty and unrewarding somehow.

I'd rather listen to Duffy..
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 33 (view)
 
Rod Stewart Waives fee
Posted: 3/23/2009 4:26:07 PM

I find the people who are a lover of Mr. Stewarts Music , also find the songs of Mick Jagger somewhat enjoyable too. ..


When he sang with the Faces, the sound had a wonderful loose, but really very well played Stonesy groove to it. I remember Maggie May being at No 1 on TOTP for weeks. In my opinion, his best records came from this era.

As for the waiving of the fee story, I'm not bothered really. Last years news..
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 144 (view)
 
If you could interview God what would you ask him?
Posted: 3/20/2009 3:52:02 PM
After further cosideration I might ask him if us earthlings could tap some of his power and use it as a source of clean energy. I think given the current concerns over global warming, this possible solution would be a good idea if God is ever found to actually exist.
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 143 (view)
 
If you could interview God what would you ask him?
Posted: 3/20/2009 2:23:22 PM
I'd ask him what he had for tea..
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 5 (view)
 
ABC special debate on whether Satan exists
Posted: 3/15/2009 6:39:24 AM
I was reading something on the BBC News website yesterday about traditional healers in Tanzania who murder albino citizens in order to chop up their bodies and make lucky potions to sell to the credulous populace. The country has about 40,000 albino's, and some of them disappear every year to furnish this trade.

A belief in Satan deserves the same disdain as this kind of magical thinking in my book.
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 6 (view)
 
Prejudice against Atheism?
Posted: 3/3/2009 4:48:13 PM
^^^^^Your solution of settling arguments about the existence of God with demonstrations of aggression that lead to one of the parties backing down sounds good, and makes me wonder how such a confrontation would go if two heavyweight contenders were selected to scrap for a once and for all judgement on the age-old question. Lets say for instance that the Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams and Richard Dawkins were made to face each other in unarmed combat. Who do you think would win?
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 2 (view)
 
Who's prayer did you like better?
Posted: 1/20/2009 7:30:09 PM
I watched on BBC News 24 and hated the prayers but liked it when Mr Obama referenced Christians, Muslims, Hindus, Jews and the non-religious. What a guy! Enjoyed Aretha Franklin's performance, although she seemed to be ducking the high notes. What was that song anyway? Sounded like God Save the Queen with the wrong words.

Emoticon intended to evoke soulful vocal effort >>
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 4 (view)
 
Master Plan
Posted: 1/15/2009 10:41:10 PM
Where did I read that the most amazing thing God could do to prove his power, would be to have created the universe, even though he does not exist? The reasoning being that such a feat would be greater and more impressive for a nonexistent being than it would for an existing one, and God has to be capable of the greatest and most impressive thing ever to be worthy of the title.

I s'pose for God to have a Master Plan even though he does not exist would be even more impressive..
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 66 (view)
 
Self-Taught Evolution
Posted: 12/29/2008 5:41:24 AM

Absolutely everyone should read the special evolution issue of Scientific American that is currently on the shelf.


Readable online for those who are too lazy to leave the house and visit a newsagent.

http://www.sciam.com/sciammag/
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 2 (view)
 
The real meaning of Christmas.
Posted: 12/27/2008 7:07:52 PM
The man who massacred his ex-wife's family was dressed as Santa Claus. Bad form. Sends out the wrong message.

I'm a bit lost with the reference to Jesus recovering the One Ring. Wasn't it Sauron who tried to recover it but was thwarted by those meddling Hobbits?

Look: A bouncy thing>
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 30 (view)
 
What is Spirituality?
Posted: 12/27/2008 3:39:50 AM
^^^^^My view of ghosts has probably been jaded by watching too much Scooby Doo in my youth. The ghosts in that cartoon series are always debunked and found to be fraudulent apparitions contrived to scare people away and financially benefit someone who would have succeeded, "if it wasn't for you meddling kids!"

Seriously though, the fact that you had a previously sceptical attitude and your experience was corroborated by others makes yours a compelling anecdote, although it tells us nothing about what ghosts are. Do they have an objective existence outside of our minds or are they caused by recordings of past events, somehow impregnated into the fabric of certain locations and able to interfere with the brain, or something else entirely?
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 147 (view)
 
God Delusion
Posted: 12/27/2008 1:48:04 AM
black wolf said:
If i may say that yes iam a atheist and yes atheist do exsist if that's what you ment.But in any case i just dont understand if there where a god out there where is he or her has god ever once shown any physicaly proof to exsist?

To which gottalight replied:
I have all of the physical proof I will ever need. I can't prove it to you because it is a genetic characteristic like color blindness that some people don't have. Can you prove that "red" exists to a color blind man? I don't particualarly care whether you believe or not. I am just asking if you have faith in your disbelief?

To reiterate a bit, you do imply in the above extract that your insight into the "physical proof" of God's existence is the result of a genetic characteristic like colour blindness that some people don't have. To me this looks like a claim that would put your "ability" into the realm of the testably real, except for the fact that there is no known gene that causes some people to perceive levels of reality that are inaccessable to the rest of us. Also this raises the question of if there is such a gene, and it has some kind of survival value, why hasn't it proliferated more freely in the gene pool?

The concept reminds me a bit of 1970's UK TV series, The Tomorrow people. These were a group of young people who were each discovering that they had been genetically endowed with super-human powers like telepathy and teleportation. They were in effect, the next stage in human evolution, known as Homo Superior. The drama of the series was provided by the dastardly machinations of the Homo Sapien authorities (referred to derisorily as Saps) to capture the Tomorrow People and put them to military use.

Maybe you are a Homo Superior, (please don't sue me for calling you a homo) but I doubt it. More likely you are possessed of a disposition that causes you to confuse your inner imaginative world with observable reality. In another age or culture, perhaps you would have found employment as a shaman, or provided stake burning fodder as a visionary heretic, Joan of Arc style.

Anyway, hope I haven't caused further affront here. As I said, no insult or offence intended.
 clarence clutterbuck
Joined: 4/13/2008
Msg: 144 (view)
 
God Delusion
Posted: 12/26/2008 6:56:09 PM
No offence or insult intended gottalight, and I did say that you should only consult a psychiatrist if the visions become problematic. For instance, if you are Divinely ordered to raid your kitchen kniferack and go out to clean the streets, shrinkular advice would be recommended.

I think a lot of us are less than a full shilling mentally, but this probably never comes to light unless it interferes with our mundane everyday functioning, and in some cases may even be helpful, as in the case of artists and creative people.
 
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